Apr 032018
 
Share Button
Michael Gallup, Colorado State Rams (August 26, 2017)

Michael Gallup – © USA TODAY Sports

New York Giants 2018 NFL Draft Preview: Wide Receivers

by BigBlueInteractive.com Contributor Sy’56

1 – Michael Gallup – Colorado State – 6’1/205

Grade: 82

Strong Points:

-Smooth and easy approach but plays fast and aggressive
-A weapon after the catch that fights through tackles and displays good vision
-Adjusts to the ball with full balance, control, concentration

Weak Points:

-Effort and energy output can be inconsistent
-Doesn’t track the deep ball well
-Ran a limited route tree and will have an uphill climb mentally

Summary:

Spent two years at Colorado State after a two year stint in junior college. Was originally committed to Georgia out of high school but didn’t have the grades. Gallup isn’t a household name but his game translates to the next level very well. He is physical, explosive, and an excellent hands-catcher. If he can learn the offensive system he is drafted in to, he can be a stud. Everything else is there.

NFL Comparison: DeAndre Hopkins / HOU

2 – Courtland Sutton – SMU – 6’3/218

Grade: 81

Strong Points:

-Overly physical and a borderline bully that wants to beat up defensive backs
-Pure hands catcher, swallows the ball on contact
-Effective and experienced with yards after the catch, can create on his own

Weak Points:

-Struggles to separate down field because of a lack of long speed
-Route running needs a lot of work
-Relied on being more talented rather than doing things right

Summary:

Fourth year junior entry. Enters the league with a massive amount of production, mainly a result of the scheme he played in. Caught a lot of uncontested passes, ran a lot of easy routes. Sutton is a gamble because of how much progression and learning he will need to under go, but the upside is enormous. He already has the ability to come down with the ball in traffic and he has shown the ability to burst, change direction, and jump. He may need more time than the common first round WR, but his potential is elite.

NFL Comparison: Dez Bryant / DAL

3 – Calvin Ridley – Alabama – 6’0/189

Grade: 80

Strong Points

-Lightening quick off the line, in and out of hs breaks, immediate separation
-Attacks the ball with his hands, very goo mechanically
-Competitive, fiery player that will play with an edge

Weak Points:

-Weak presence against the press, can be tossed around
-Too may drops over his entire career, ongoing issue
-Doesn’t win enough of the 1 on 1 battles downfield

Summary:

¬Junior entry. It has been a rough ride for Ridley. He came in with really high expectations and everyone labeled him the next Amari Cooper, but he never quite reached that level. Part of why that was the case was the Alabama offense and inconsistent passing game. I was looking to give this kid a top 10 overall grade but too many things kept popping up. A lack of presence and inconsistent hands stood out to me. Still a 1st round talent that is NFL ready right now, but I don’t see a star.

NFL Comparison: Malcolm Mitchell / NE

4 – Equanimeous St. Brown – Notre Dame – 6’5/214

Grade: 80

Strong Points:

-Long but easy moving limbs, very fluid
-High points the ball, times his leaps and lunges for the ball
-Has the long stride speed to be a factor in the open field

Weak Points:

-Struggles to get off the strong jam at the point of attack, not very physical
-Needs more core strength, his lack of it shows up on tape
-Needs more urgency as a route runner

Summary:

Junior entry. Had a strong 2016 season with Kizer throwing the ball and everyone as excited about him heading in to 2017, but the horrid QB play took away a third of his production. St. Brown is an upside based pick, as he just doesn’t look ready to handle the physical side of the NFL yet. But Gettleman loves big WRs that display ball skills and smoothness to their moving, and those are stand out traits with St. Brown.

NFL Comparison: Tyrell Williams / LAC

5 – DJ Moore – Maryland – 6’0/210

Grade: 80

Strong Points:

-Tough, hard nosed, fiery player that wants it
-Has a running back type mentality and ability after the catch
-Can shoot out of a cannon, excellent burst straight line and laterally

Weak Points:

-Lack of height and length limit him in traffic, especially downfield
-Ran a limited route tree
-Separation as a route runner isn’t near what it should be

Summary:

Junior entry. 2017 Big 10 Offensive Player of the Year. Moore turned in to one of my favorite players to watch towards the end of the year. He wasn’t really on my radar, then I saw 3 straight games and just loved how how competed. He has some of the Steve Smith (CAR/BAL) fire in him. He checked a lot of boxes, then I got some really good information on his intangibles and attitude, and then he crushed the combine. Put him with a real QB and I think you are talking about a big time difference maker over time.

NFL Comparison: Sammy Watkins / KC

6 – Anthony Miller – Memphis – 5’11/201

Grade: 80

Strong Points:

-Feisty, tough, and hard nosed with and without the ball, he will compete
-Explosive in short areas, can burst from a standstill both as a runner and jumper
-Hard to hang with as a route runner, consistently separates

Weak Points:

-Lack of size shows up on tape
-Too many drops on easy, catchable balls
-Saw a lot of production come on uncontested catches

Summary:

Fifth year senior. It took me 2-3 games to really convince myself that Miller was more than a gimmicky pass catcher. Once I did come around, I was sold hard. Miller looks small but can play big in certain situations. His movement and toughness stand out, as he is a guy that will succeed in the slot early but could make plays on the outside as well once he learns the NFL game. You may need to be patient with him, but I also don’t bet against talent that plays with passion.

NFL Comparison: Antonio Brown / PIT

7 – Daesean Hamilton – Penn State – 6’1/203

Grade: 80

Strong Points:

-Excellent route runner with explosive, quick feet and powerful re-direction
-Aggressive and brave in traffic
-Hard worker on and off the field that understands the game and his role

Weak Points:

-Too many concentration drops on easy throws
-Lacks the final gear to outrun corners on deep routes
-Isn’t a natural-vision ball carrier after the catch, will leave some yards on the table

Summary:

Fifth year senior that left Penn State as one of the most accomplished receivers in the program’s history. Hamilton is made for the slot initially, but can be a playmaker on the outside as well. His ball skills are very good, but just a bit inconsistent. Hamilton is a first class, mature beyond his years individual that you know will come in and work his butt off. The talent is there, as he will be a kid tat can get open right away and he is tough over the middle. In the right situation, he is the kind of WR that caches 80+ passes in year one.

NFL Comparison: Randall Cobb / GB

8 – Trey Quinn – SMU – 5’11/203

Grade: 78

Strong Points:

-Pro caliber route runner and hands catcher right now
-Light feet and easy change of direction, can explode in small areas
-Crafty and smart, understands how to create space and take advantage of it

Weak Points:

-Might be an underneath threat-only, doesn’t get behind corners downfield
-Lacks range as a pass catcher, not a big one on one guy
-Ran a limited route tree, will have a lot to learn

Summary:

Fourth year junior. Began his career at LSU after setting the national high school record for catches in high school. Had a hard time breaking in to the regular rotation and transferred to SMU, sitting out 2016. In his one year there, he led the nation in catches despite sharing the field with fellow prospect Courtland Sutton Quinn has top-tier slot receiver written all over him. He is one of the more reliable hands catchers, changes direction on a dime, and simply plays smarter than others. He won’t be stat anywhere, but he can be a big difference maker.

9 – Dylan Cantrell – Texas Tech – 6’3/226

Grade: 78

Strong Points:

-Physical pass catcher that wins the majority of his one on one battles
-Top tier athlete, both straight line and short area agility
-Tough matchup in space with the ball in his hands, breaks tackles with ease

Weak Points:

-Coming from a WR-friendly offense, needs time to adjust
-Needs to get out of his breaks better
-Doesn’t have a natural sense of vision and escapability

Summary:

Fifth year senior. Missed 2015 with a back injury but played all but 2 games over 2016 and 2017. Cantrell was on my radar heading in to 2017 as a potential day 3 pick, but he quickly grew on me with his straight line burst at 220+ pounds and physical style. Cantrell toys around with defensive backs like he is a 250 pound tight end. He always wins the physical battle and his athleticism leads me to believe there is a lot of untapped potential as a route runner.

NFL Comparison: Demaryius Thomas – DEN

10 – Christian Kirk – Texas A& M – 5’10/201

Grade: 77

Strong Points:

-Elite straight line burst with the ball
-Good concentration in traffic, plays bigger than he is
-Route running has come a long way, he is very detailed and advanced

Weak Points:

-Too much of a straight line athlete that struggles to adjust on the fly
-Limited range as a pass catcher
-May be a slot-only receiver

Summary:

Junior entry. Burst on to the scene in 2015 as a record setting freshman, looked like the next big thing. After catching 80 passes for 1,009 yards and 8 TDs in addition to 3 punt return TDs, Kirk was labeled a 1st rounder too early. He did have to deal with inconsistent QB play, but he never developed some of the top tier physical traits you want out of a slot WR. Those guys need to have more short area quickness and ability change direction, while think Kirk is more of a straight-line guy. He is a solid day 2 guy that can add value as a returner, but I don’t see enough to put a 1st round grade on him at WR.

NFL Comparison: Kenny Stills / MIA

11 – James Washington – Oklahoma State – 5’11/213

Grade: 77

Strong Points:

-Powerfully built with long arms and big hands, and he plays like it too
-Tracks the deep ball exceptionally well, with balance and accuracy
-Can play at different speeds, good at playing the mental game with DBs

Weak Points:

-Ran a very limited route tree in college
-Doesn’t have the true runaway speed as a deep threat
-Doesn’t explode out of his breaks, separation isn’t always there

Summary:

Ultra-productive 4 year career that made a living on catching the deep ball. Has been the top downfield receiver over the past 2 seasons. Washington benefited from the scheme and conference he played n when considering his production, but there is still plenty of quality tape here. He may even be a guy that is better made for the NFL because of how strong he can play in traffic. Washington isn’t a blazer, but his ball tracking and power presence make him a threat in one on one situations. Interesting prospect here.

NFL Comparison: Mohamed Sanu / ATL

12 – Braxton Berrios – Miami – 5’9/184

Grade: 77

Strong Points:

-Dangerous from the slot with his easy, top notch agility and route running
-Adjust to the poorly thrown ball, always has full control of his body
-Feisty competitor that will find ways to create on his own

Weak Points:

-He is at the bottom tier of size in the NFL
-Doesn’t have the deep speed to put a corner on his heels
-Hips don’t fluidly change direction

Summary:

The kind of guy you want playing the slot is smart, quick, reliable, consistent, and tough. Berrios checks all those boxes with flying colors. He will be a limited contributor in the passing game, but a valuable one. He can also bring value as a punt returner.

NFL Comparison: Trent Taylor / SF

13 – Simmie Cobbs – Indiana – 6’3/220

Grade: 76

Strong Points:

-Physical, plays the role of a bully when the ball is in the air
-Excels with the back shoulder throws, able to control his body while adjusting
-Able to win in traffic often

Weak Points:

-Lacks both the short area burst and long speed to create separation
-Isn’t very explosive way to get in and of breaks laterally
-Lacks the quickness and looseness in his hips after the catch

Summary:

Has been the downfield threat in the IU offense for 3 years in a row. There are holes in his athleticism but he doesn’t have to be open to make the impact. Cobbs makes a lot of catches with defenders draped all over him, he wins more than his fair share of 50/50 balls. He is an interesting outside WR in a class that doesn’t have a lot of them.

NFL Comparison: Mike Evans / TB

14 – Javon Wims – Georgia – 6’3/215

Grade: 75

Strong Points:

-No hesitation in playing the physical game
-Boxes out defenders from the ball, knows how to use his body
-Tracks the ball well, good balance and accuracy

Weak Points:

-Drops too many of the easy passes
-Lacks the over the top speed, may be limited on the route tree
-Seemed to struggle making reads against zone coverage

Summary:

Junior college transfer that really broke out in 2017, leading the Bulldogs in catches, yards, and TDs. The former basketball player is a solid possession receiver prospect that is very body and space aware, something you need to see for someone that lacks deep speed. Backup early on in his career that still comes across raw and therefore a higher ceiling than most.

NFL Comparison: Allen Robinson / CHI

15 – DJ Chark – LSU – 6’3/199

Grade: 75

Strong Points:

-Top tier long speed, immediate deep threat
-Good vision with the ball in his hands
-Has a smoothness to his game that makes things look easy

Weak Points:

-Doesn’t play physical enough, gets tossed around
-Struggles to locate, track, and attack the ball with balance
-Sloppy route runner

Summary:

Suffered through some poor QB play at LSU in an offense that always favored the running game. Chark had his moments of brilliance and then went to the combine and tore it up. There is a lot of excitement surrounding him but I went back and watched all the LSU tape I had and I just don’t see the ball skills. It is hard to be a deep threat without ball skills…maybe he can be like Ted Ginn and evolve as his career goes, but there is too low of a floor here for me to consider him early day 2.

NFL Comparison: Torrey Smith / SF

16 = Antonio Callaway – Florida – 5’11/200 – GRADE: 75
17 – Deon Cain – Clemson – 6’2/202 – GRADE: 75
18 – Dante Pettis – Washington – 6’0/186 – GRADE: 75
19 – Auden Tate – Florida State – 6’5/228 – GRADE: 75
20 – Korey Robertson – Southern Miss – 6’1/212 – GRADE: 73
21 – Justin Watson – Pennsylvania – 6’3/225 – GRADE: 73
22 – Cam Phillips – Virginia Tech – 6’0/195 – GRADE: 73
23 – J’Mon Moore – Missouri – 6’3/207 – GRADE: 73
24 – Jordan Lasley – UCLA – 6’1/203 – GRADE: 72
25 – Byron Pringle – Kansas State – 6’1/205 – GRADE: 71

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

David Syvertsen

David Syvertsen, aka Sy'56, has worked for Ourlads Scouting LLC since 2013, starting off as a college depth chart manager and now a lead scout for one the most-sold NFL draft guides year-in, year-out. He has been scouting for over 10 years and will compile anywhere from 400-600 scouting reports per season, with that number increasing year by year. He watches and studies game films 20-25 hours per week throughout the entire year with his main focus being NFL Draft prospects.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.