Nov 022015
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Tom Coughlin addressed the media by conference call on Monday:

Coughlin: I just have a couple thoughts to talk about today. I think, for one thing, it’s very important for everyone to understand we win and we lose as a team. There is none of this pointing the finger, there’s none of that. I don’t believe in that. What we spent last week trying to do, obviously, our goal—well not obviously, but our goal and our objective last week was to raise the level of our execution on all fronts, on all three phases, knowing full well that when you get to this time of the year, you better be playing your best football as you go through these more difficult games versus divisional, non-divisional, conference, non-conference opponents as you go through the meat and potatoes of your schedule here right in the middle of the year. You’ve got to be playing your best football or approaching that. So that was our goal. We did not accomplish that, obviously.

We had some difficulty on the defensive side of the ball, no doubt, and some errors did occur, but we played hard and their passing game was very sharp, they had the ball right on the money, right where they needed to, they did rush the ball when they needed to, as well, but I can tell you that we continued to battle. I really felt when we scored our defensive touchdown that we were going to win.

The end of the game pointed out another lesson for us, and we do come by our lessons in a very difficult and hard manner, we managed not to finish. We’ve always talked about finish, finish, finish and we needed to finish the game. We tried, even with 36 seconds left, we were trying to move the ball down the field to get our chance for a last-second field goal attempt ourselves. We had a couple of opportunities right there in that last three-and-out drive where the ball was very close, it was right on the finger tips twice, one would’ve given us a big play probably to midfield, another one would’ve given us a play to get us out-of-bounds and keep the ball, but that didn’t happen either.

Then the only special teams thing, which I didn’t like in the game—well, there were a couple things—for them to have a 24-yard punt return at that time of the game and then to have a penalty, a face mask penalty adding another 15 yards, that’s a very, very difficult way to lose and a difficult way for us to have gone in there to a very tough place to play, battled, and yet not be able to come away with a victory.

So what I spoke to our team about this morning was we’re still in first place in our division and we’ve got the Tampa Bay team coming up that just won a football game in overtime, obviously playing much better themselves than they had at the beginning of the year, and so we’ve got to get ready to play a very good Tampa Bay team.

Q: On a day when Eli Manning threw six touchdown passes, you mentioned the fumble return for a touchdown, would you ever envision that this game would go the other way with all the points that your offense and defense all scored.

A: You wouldn’t, unless you were standing on the other sideline watching them put points on the board, too. I mean, remember we’re down three scores twice and we battled back. Obviously, a very, very good score right before the half and then coming back after the half and making the big play to Odell down the middle of the field to give us the tying score, those things were outstanding. We had to scrap and we did. We scored 21 points in the fourth quarter, which normally you’d be in celebration. You’d be talking about an accomplishment that, I don’t care who you are, is very rare for a professional or any other football team to be able to score of that nature in the fourth quarter. We did and we lost the game. There are a lot of reasons to be shaking your head.

Q: The defense has been doing a relatively good job of keeping tight ends at bay. What exactly was Benjamin Watson doing to find the seams in the defense?

A: They run a series of schemes with Watson and with the tight ends, I mean not necessarily just with him, but when they play, mobile tight ends they have a very good running attack but they also can spread you out and throw the ball to people, tight ends, that can run. This guy, he just got in the middle of the field from a 3-1 set, which gave him either crossing to the other hash mark, to the other seam on the other side of the field or right down the middle of the field and he was able to beat us down the middle of the field. There were a couple of times when that occurred. Colston hurt us up the seam one time and then back inside another time when he was really uncontested.

Q: How do you regroup defensively?

A: You go back to fundamentals, you go back to some basics that obviously we struggled with a little bit. A couple times we didn’t line up properly or quickly enough, our communication sometimes was not as good as it should’ve been. I thought our guys basically did a nice job in a domed stadium, especially one of that nature where the noise level is such, but I thought we handled that very well. I just think there were a couple empty sets that they threw at us, a couple times we were late to the line. I think that happened a couple times in the game and those are the things that bother me the most. Get yourself lined up, get your eyes where they belong, play the technique you’re supposed to play, be ready to be a reactionary football player on the snap of the ball, definitely know what your assignment is, whether it be zone or whether it be man, and try to be at the right spot at the right time. So those are the things when issues arise, you’ve got to deal with them. So we will make sure those things get ironed out.

Q: You only had a short period of time with JPP last week and saw some encouraging things. Can you talk a little bit about what you’re looking for this week? What kind of things you might increase with him?

A: We’ll increase everything. We’ll increase number of snaps, we’ve had a couple sessions with him in pads when others are obviously not on the field, so we’ll take a good hard look at that, but we’ll have two good practice days with him and we’ll push the envelope a little bit to test the conditioning level. We probably can’t get, at this point of the season, a real physical practice but we can do some things and if we have to be creative in other areas, we would. But just the advancement of the player and the continuation of developing his conditioning in the uniform and then the ability to deliver a blow, to accept a blow, to have his hand placement be exactly where it has to be, and then, of course, the opportunity for him to gain his timing as he becomes a threat in the pass rush game.

Q: Is there any chance that he can show you enough this week that he could play on Sunday at Tampa?:

A: Everybody words it a little bit differently, but, again, if he practices and continues to advance in the way that he has over the last few days that he’s been with us, if we feel good where he is physically after he goes through this, then that would be a decision that we would be confident in making.

Q: You talked about the alignment problems on defense. How much of that is the fact you had to make the switch at middle linebacker?

A: Some of that is that. Some of that is that. That’s a key communication spot and there were some occasions there where perhaps the communication wasn’t necessarily the way you’d want it to be, but there weren’t many. The guys playing in there, even though you don’t think Brinkley’s been in there much, he’s been practicing, and also the other linebackers are involved in the communication process as well. So it’s not just that one spot.

Q: You spoke to fundamentals, are missed tackles becoming a concern?

A: They’re always a concern. You need to keep them at a minimum. Last week, the New Orleans Saints gained 57 percent of the yardage made in the passing game after the catch so that was a main concern going in, we were prepared with that and we had talked an awful lot about being able to tackle well. Tackling is, obviously, a very big fundamental. It’s the first thing we do every week. We tackle and then the next day, we take the ball away so we’re always practicing that particular fundamental, but when it occurs in a game, then you do have some missed tackles, certainly a concern.

Q: Do you have an update on Prince? Is he getting an MRI this week?

A: No. There’s a bunch of guys who are getting MRIs.

Q: Is Victor Cruz one of them or is he cleared this week to practice?

A: I have no information like that, no.

Q: How about Larry Donnell and Orleans Darkwa?

A: They’re being—all the tests are being done this morning, so hopefully we’ll get something today or tomorrow morning.

Q: On the drive that the Saints tied the game, you had New Orleans at a couple of third-and-short and fourth-and-short, was that just a case of a big physical back kind of just running down the defense at that point? What did you see on a couple of those things?

A: We were there. As a matter of fact, on the first one in their territory, we were in position—Kerry Wynn had really almost got to the point where he had one of the legs of the ball carrier and he went up over the top and made it. That’s always going to be the case like that. It was a physical match right in the middle there and certainly there wasn’t a whole lot of yardage gained, but there was enough to secure the first down.

Q: Did your offensive line not play as well as you hoped they would?

A: I always have high expectations for them. Certainly, they were the group that protected the passer yesterday who threw six touchdown passes. We had 21 runs, averaged 4.1 yards per carry. It’s not as many as I would like, but there’s always—the thing you’re not asking but you are asking is the goal line situations were not just a bowling ball effect where we knocked our way into the end zone. I thought they did a nice job of defending, but I also feel like where we were prepared to make an adjustment there, which really we just never got to because we didn’t get into that type of personnel again. We weren’t inside in the goal line situation again. Would I like to have run the ball into the end zone? Sure, I would. You bet I would. Would I like to see that our short yardage could be accomplished running the ball? Yes, I would and I’d give credit to what New Orleans was able to do in the goal line situation in their attempt to keep us out. We resorted to throwing the ball to score. But would I like to be able to line up and run it in? Yes, I would.

Transcripts of Monday’s media conference calls with the following players:

The Elias Sports Bureau changed CB Trumaine McBride’s touchdown from a fumble return to an interception. It was determined that the intended receiver, Willie Snead, did not control the ball enough for it to be a catch. CB Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie is no longer credited with a forced fumble.

The Giants and Saints combined for 101 points, making this the second-highest scoring game in Giants history and tied for the third-highest ever in the NFL. The Redskins (72) and Giants (41) combined for 113 points on November 27, 1966.

The 49 points are the most the Giants have scored in a loss in their 91-year history.

The Giants’ seven touchdowns tied for the second-highest total in franchise history, achieved nine times previously, most recently in a victory the last time they faced New Orleans, on December 9, 2012. The franchise record is eight touchdowns in a game, which the Giants have done three times.

The teams combined to throw an NFL-record 13 touchdown passes (seven by Drew Brees, six by Eli Manning).

QB Drew Brees’ seven touchdown passes tied both the NFL record for most scoring passes in a game, and the most ever against the Giants. On November 14, 1943, QB Sid Luckman of the Chicago Bears threw seven touchdown passes in a 56-7 triumph over the Giants.

New Orleans gained 608 yards, the second-highest total ever by a Giants opponent. Chicago gained 682 yards on November 14, 1943, in the game in which Luckman threw seven touchdown passes. Previously, the second-highest yardage total given up the Giants was 577 – which occurred on their previous visit to New Orleans, on November 28, 2011.

New Orleans’ 35 first downs were the second-highest total ever for a Giants’ opponent. The Los Angeles Rams had 38 first downs in a 55-14 victory on November 13, 1966.

The Saints’ 505 net passing yards were a record for a Giants opponent. The previous mark of 488 was set by the Bears on November 14, 1943.

Manning threw a career-high six touchdown passes. His previous best was five against Philadelphia on December 30, 2012.

The six touchdown passes tied for the second-highest total in Giants history. Y.A. Tittle threw for seven scores at Washington on October 28, 1962, and for six vs. Dallas on December 16, 1962.

Manning’s six touchdown passes increased his career total to 276. That moved him past Joe Montana (273) and Vinny Testaverde (275) and into 10th place on the NFL’s career list.

WR Odell Beckham and WR Dwayne Harris became the first pair of Giants teammates with at least two touchdown receptions in the same game since October 10, 1993, when WR Mike Sherrard and TE Howard Cross had two apiece in a 41-7 victory at Washington.

The Giants have lost their last five games in New Orleans. The Giants last won in the Superdome in 1993.


The players are off Tuesday and return to practice on Wednesday to start preparing for Sunday’s game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

Nov 012015
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Eli Manning, New York Giants (November 1, 2015)

Eli Manning – © USA TODAY Sports Images

The New York Giants lost a heart-breaker at the Superdome in New Orleans on Sunday, falling 52-49. With the loss, the Giants fell to 4-4 overall.

In a game that featured 13 touchdown passes and over 1,000 yards of offense, the game-winning, 50-yard field goal was kicked as time expired. The field goal came on the very next snap after the Giants punted the ball away from their own 25-yard line with 20 seconds left to play. The Saints’ returned the punt 24 yards, fumbled and recovered the fumble, and punter Brad Wing was flagged with a 15-yard facemask penalty to set the ball up at the New York 32-yard line with five seconds left in regulation.

The Giants’ offense accrued 42 points, 28 first downs, and 416 total net yards (87 rushing and 329 passing). Quarterback Eli Manning was 30-of-41 for 350 yards, 6 touchdowns, and 0 interceptions. He became the first quarterback in NFL history to have a 6-to-0 touchdown-to-interception ratio and still lose a football game.

The problem for the Giants was their atrocious defense that allowed seven touchdowns, 35 first downs, and 608 yards of offense (103 rushing and 505 passing). Quarterback Drew Brees, who was not sack and rarely pressured, threw seven touchdown passes. The yardage and first down totals were the second most ever allowed in franchise history.

The Giants had the football five times in the first half and scored three offensive touchdowns on drives of 60, 79, and 80 yards. They punted on the two other drives after going three-and-out. Wide receiver Odell Beckham scored on a 2-yard touchdown pass on 4th-and-goal and a 1-yard touchdown pass on 2nd-and-goal. Running back Shane Vereen caught a 2-yard touchdown pass with only two seconds on the clock before halftime.

But the Giants trailed 28-21 at the half because the New York defense allowed four consecutive touchdown drives of 80, 96, 80, and 60 yards. They only forced one punt on the initial possession.

In the second half, the Giants scored on three more offensive possessions of 65, 80, and 65 yards with Beckham catching a 50-yard touchdown and wide receiver Dwayne Harris catching 9- and 20-yard touchdown passes. The 9-yard touchdown came on 4th-and-5.

Dwayne Harris, New York Giants (November 1, 2015)

Dwayne Harris – © USA TODAY Sports Images

The defense forced two turnovers in the second half, including scoring on a 63-yard fumble return by cornerback Trumaine McBride that cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie forced, giving the Giants a 49-42 lead with 7:11 to play. But the defense simply could not hold as Saints scored on three 80-yard drives, the last to tie the game with 36 seconds left to play. Rodgers-Cromartie was involved in the other turnover, intercepting Brees inside the New York 10-yard line after tight end Will Tye fumbled the ball away at the 36-yard line.

The leading rusher for the Giants was running back Rashad Jennings with 54 yards on 10 carries. The leading receivers were Beckham (8 catches for 130 yards, 3 touchdowns), Vereen (8 catches for 60 yards, 1 touchdown), wide receiver Rueben Randle (5 catches for 55 yards), and Harris (3 catches for 37 yards, 2 touchdowns).

Video highlights/lowlights are available at

TE Larry Donnell (neck) and RB Orleans Darkwa (back) left the game with injuries. WR Dwayne Harris (knee/ankle), RG Geoff Schwartz (ankle), and CB Jayron Hosley (facial laceration) were all hurt, but returned to the game.

Video clips of post-game media sessions with Head Coach Tom Coughlin and the following players are available at

  • Head Coach Tom Coughlin (Video)
  • QB Eli Manning (Video)
  • WR Odell Beckham (Video)
  • LB Devon Kennard (Video)
  • CB Trumaine McBride (Video)
  • S Landon Collins (Video)

Inactive for the Giants were WR Victor Cruz (calf), DE Owamagbe Odighizuwa (hamstring), LB Jon Beason (ankle/knee), LB J.T. Thomas (ankle), CB Prince Amukamara (pectoral), DT Louis Nix, and OT Bobby Hart.

Jasper Brinkley started at middle linebacker for Beason and Jonathan Casillas started at weakside linebacker for Thomas.


Oct 312015
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The New York Giants have signed linebacker James Morris to the 53-man roster from the team’s Practice Squad. To make room for Morris, the Giants waived cornerback Brandon McGee.

The Giants signed Morris to the Practice Squad on September 16. Morris was originally signed as an undrafted rookie free agent by the New England Patriots after the 2014 NFL Draft. The Patriots placed him on Injured Reserve in August 2014 after tearing an ACL in the final preseason game against the Giants.

The Giants signed McGee to the Practice Squad on October 15 and to the 53-man roster on October 18. McGee was originally drafted in the 5th round of the 2013 NFL Draft by the St. Louis Rams.

The Giants are short at linebacker this week with J.T. Thomas (ankle) out and Jon Beason (ankle/knee) questionable for the game against the Saints. Beason did make the trip to New Orleans.


Oct 302015
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WR Victor Cruz (calf), DE Owamagbe Odighizuwa (hamstring), LB J.T. Thomas (ankle), and CB Prince Amukamara (pectoral) have been ruled out of Sunday’s game against the New Orleans Saints. OT Will Beatty (pectoral – PUP) and DE Jason Pierre-Paul (hand – roster exemption) also will not play.

LB Jon Beason (ankle/knee) is “questionable” for the game.

WR Odell Beckham (hamstring), RG Geoff Schwartz (ankle), and LB Uani ‘Unga (neck) are “probable” for the game.

Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with Tom Coughlin are available in The Corner Forum and at

New York Giants defensive end addressed the media for the first time on Friday since maiming himself in a July 4th fireworks accident. The transcript of his media session is available in The Corner Forum while the video is available at

For those with stronger stomachs who want to see what’s left of Pierre-Paul’s right hand, see JPP reveals mangled right hand as he relives fireworks mishap by Howie Kussoy of The New York Post.


The Giants will have a 45-minute, up-tempo “walk-thru” practice on Saturday that is not open to the media. The Giants play the Saints in New Orleans on Sunday.

Oct 292015
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WR Victor Cruz (calf), DE Owamagbe Odighizuwa (hamstring), LB Jon Beason (ankle/knee), LB J.T. Thomas (ankle), and CB Prince Amukamara (pectoral) did not practice on Thursday.

OT Will Beatty (pectoral – PUP) and DE Jason Pierre-Paul (hand – roster exemption) continue to work on an undisclosed limited basis.

“(Pierre-Paul) moved around well,” said Head Coach Tom Coughlin about Pierre-Paul’s practice on Wednesday. “He moved well and I think he proved to the medical people that he’s in good shape. That’s not to include all the back and forth, sideways stuff. He’s going to have to work his way through some of that, too. But he’s in excellent condition…He’s going to get a couple of reps in scout squad today.”

“Today was really the first day he kind of did anything,” said Defensive Coordinator Steve Spagnuolo after Thursday’s practice. “I know he ran around yesterday, so I haven’t really had a chance to watch the film. It’s going to take a little while, it’s really early now. We want to be optimistic, and I know he is, too, but I think we want to be smart about it. We’ll just see where it goes.”

“(Beatty has) been out here working the last couple days and doing a nice job and doing everything he can to put himself in position to come back as soon as he can,” said Offensive Coordinator Ben McAdoo. “We look forward to having him back when he’s ready…He’s doing a nice job out here. He’s working, getting his feet wet, getting his shoulders going. We’ll be ready for him when he’s ready to come back. Excited to get him back.”

RG Geoff Schwartz (ankle) practiced on a limited basis. WR Odell Beckham (hamstring) and LB Uani ‘Unga (neck) fully practiced.

“I’ll say this, today (Beckham) was sticking his foot in the ground, he was coming out of his breaks with some speed and energy and made some nice plays,” said McAdoo.

According to, the 1-year contract signed by defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul has a maximum value of $8.71 million and includes:

  • $1.5 million guaranteed salary.
  • $1.5 million maximum in per game active roster bonuses (approximately $214,285 for each game he is on the 46-man roster on game day, up to seven games).
  • $3.85 million in playing-time incentives ($100,000 per week if he plays 45 percent of the snaps, $300,000 for 75 percent of the snaps, and $550,000 for 80 percent of the snaps – again up to seven games).
  • $1.864 million in sack-performance incentives (must accrue 7.5 sacks to receive full amount; if he records 10 sacks, he gets the full $3.85 million playing-time bonus regardless of playing time).

So all Pierre-Paul needs to do to receive $3 million is be active for seven games this season, regardless of how well or poorly he plays. reports that to get his full $8.71 million (basically the 9-game prorated amount of his original $14.813 million tender), Pierre Paul needs to be on the active roster for seven games AND either (a) play 80 percent of the defensive snaps while recording at least 7.5 sacks or (b) record 10 sacks.

As part of the deal, the Giants agreed not to put Pierre-Paul on the Non-Football Injury (NFI) List. Thus, Pierre-Paul is now eligible to become an unrestricted free agent in 2016 unless the Giants Franchise him again or sign him to another deal after the season and before free agency begins.

Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following coaches are available in The Corner Forum and at

Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at


Instead of practicing, the Giants will hold a “recovery day” on Friday. The players will select two of six recovery stations, based on seniority. Their choices are massage, yoga, FMS (Functional Movement Screen) exercises designed for the individual, air compression boots, contrast bath (between a hot and cold tub), and self-massage with stick rollers and elastic bands.

The Giants will also have a 45-minute, up-tempo “walk-thru” practice on Saturday that is not open to the media. The Giants play the Saints in New Orleans on Sunday.

Oct 282015
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Jason Pierre-Paul, New York Giants (November 3, 2014)

Jason Pierre-Paul– © USA TODAY Sports Images

As was to be expected, Head Coach Tom Coughlin was repeatedly asked about the return of defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul to the team during his press conference on Wednesday.

“(Pierre-Paul) will start with the medical team,” said Coughlin. “He can do all the jog-thru’s, he can be out there for whatever we’re doing pre-practice, then he’s going to slide off to the side with the medical people, be under their supervision. How long that lasts is really according to how well they feel he’s able to proceed. He’s told me that he’s worked against bags, he’s delivered blows on a board and done all of those things. When he came in, he looked good. I asked him what he weighed, he said 268, and he was right on the money. So he’s worked, he’s been working. We’ll just see how fast this comes along.

“(His teammates) looked forward to seeing Jason. He’s excited about being here and he’s anxious to get started. I think that’s a good thing and the rest of the guys picked up on that right away…We’re all rooting for him, to be honest with you. He had a very traumatic experience and he’s done really what appears to be an outstanding job of preparing himself. He is mentally very upbeat, his attitude is outstanding. He’s anxious to go and play right now, to be honest with you. But they’re going to go relatively slow on that. Yeah, it will be a wonderful thing to have him come back, get ready to play, and play and contribute, which is his plan.”

Coughlin was asked how the injuries might now affect his game. “I’m hoping he’s as good as (he was),” replied Coughlin. “If you’ve studied him and you watched how he maneuvers when he does rush the passer, then he’ll use that hand basically as he always has, not necessarily as a grabber, but as a club.”

Pierre-Paul now weighs 268 pounds, down 10 pounds from his previous playing weight. “It’s a good weight,” said Coughlin.

Coughlin was also asked about how much Pierre-Paul will have to catch up with Steve Spagnuolo’s defensive system. “He’s got quite a bit to catch up on,” said Coughlin. “The terminology, sure. But he’s already started on that.”

“There’s no intention right now of him playing Sunday,” said a smiling Coughlin. “He would like to play.”

Pierre-Paul was heartily welcomed back by his teammates at a team meeting on Wednesday morning.

“It was like a standing (ovation),” said cornerback Prince Amukamara. “Everyone just cheered and was excited he’s back.”

“It’s a good day to be a Giant,” said defensive end Robert Ayers when asked about Pierre-Paul. “I think he is going to shock a lot of people…He’s a guy who’s very humbled, hungry, and motivated.”

“We know what we are up front, we know what we’ve been, we know what our strengths and weaknesses have been and he can definitely come and help out and help us improve with some of our weaknesses as a D-line,” said defensive tackle Cullen Jenkins. “He’s still fast as ever, quick as ever…He looked really good out there.”

“It’s no secret that we haven’t rushed the passer as well as we’d like to and I feel like that’s something that he definitely brings to the table, will definitely instantly help us with,” said Jenkins.

“He’s very serious, a lot more quiet, focused on what he has to do because he still has a journey ahead of him,” said Jenkins. “Just because he’s back here, his road getting back hasn’t stopped. He’s still focused on getting through that road.” analyst Pat Kirwan has his doubts about Pierre-Paul’s future as a football player (audio from SiriusXM NFL Radio interview).

WR Victor Cruz (calf), RG Geoff Schwartz (ankle), DE Owamagbe Odighizuwa (hamstring), LB Jon Beason (ankle), LB J.T. Thomas (ankle), and CB Prince Amukamara (pectoral) did not practice on Wednesday.

Head Coach Tom Coughlin already ruled out Cruz and Amukamara for this weekend’s game against the New Orleans Saints. Coughlin said Schwartz should return to practice on Thursday. Thomas was wearing a protective walking boot in the locker room, which is not a good sign for his availability on Sunday.

Because he is still on the Reserve/Physically-Unable-to-Perform (PUP) List, the Giants are not required to provide a formal update on OT Will Beatty (pectoral). Beatty returned to practice on a very limited basis last week. The Giants can only keep him on the PUP for two more weeks.

“Beatty is going to get a little bit more, little bit more, little bit more, scout team work,” said Coughlin. “I wouldn’t say (there is a possibility he might play this weekend). He’s got to start (fully practicing), he hasn’t even had shoulder pads on yet.”

LB Uani ‘Unga (neck) was limited and WR Odell Beckham (hamstring) fully practiced. “I think we’re back to the normal routine,” said Beckham who has missed most practices the past two weeks. “I don’t really quite know yet, but I definitely do feel better.”

New York Giants wide receiver/returner Dwayne Harris has been named the “NFC Special Teams Players of the Week” for his performance against his former team, the Dallas Cowboys, last Sunday. In that game, Harris scored the game-winning touchdown on a 100-yard kickoff return with seven minutes remaining in the fourth quarter of the contest. Harris is the first Giants player to win the special teams award since place kicker Josh Brown in Week 15 of the 2013 season. Harris previously won the award three times with the Dallas Cowboys against the Giants, Eagles, and Redskins, giving him an NFC East sweep.

The transcript of Tom Coughlin’s press conference on Wednesday is available in The Corner Forum while the video is available at

The following transcripts and video of player media sessions on Wednesday are available in The Corner Forum and at

The audio of Wednesday’s ESPN Radio interview with wide receiver Rueben Randle is available at


The Giants practice on Thursday and hold physical recovery cycles on Friday in advance of Sunday’s away game against the New Orleans Saints.

What a humbling experience this has been for me! I'd like to take the time out to thank God FIRST for giving me a second opportunity to play football. I'd also like to thank the Giants organization for believing in me to play for them again and to be alongside my brothers during the 2015 Season. Also, want to thank my Fiancé, Son, Family , Friends, Eugene Parker, Danny Martoe, Realitivity sports, Dr. Owens, Dr. Askari, Dr. Potparic, Debbie (hand therapist), Mike Alessi, Impact sports facility and staff, Coach John Blake, Pastor O'brien,Fans and everyone who was keeping me in their prayers and believed in me! God is good all the time! Have faith , patience and prayer with you always! Let's go Big Blue! #90PowerCircle #ImBack

A photo posted by Jason Pierre-Paul (@iamjasonpierrepaul) on

Oct 272015
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Jason Pierre-Paul, New York Giants (September 29, 2013)

Jason Pierre-Paul – © USA TODAY Sports Images

The New York Giants have officially announced that they have agreed to a 1-year contract with defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul that will keep Pierre-Paul with the team through the remainder of the 2015 NFL season. The Giants have been granted a two-game roster exemption for Pierre-Paul. During that time, he is expected to return to the practice field and begin football drills.

As has been widely publicized, Pierre-Paul suffered catastrophic injuries to his right hand in a July 4th fireworks accident, including the amputation of his index finger, the reported loss of portions of his middle finger and thumb, fractures to the thumb, and multiple skin grafts.

Pierre-Paul was designated the team’s Franchise Player in early May with a 1-year, $14.813 million tender that he never signed. That tender was reduced by approximately $6.1 million because he missed the first seven games of the season. For the last two days, it has been reported and speculated that the Giants and Pierre-Paul were working on an incentive-laden deal to replace the $8.7 million remainder of the original tender. Multiple sources are reporting that the new contract is largely based on incentives tied to performance and playing time. The hope is that he will be able to play by Week 10 or Week 12 (the Giants have a bye in Week 11).

Pierre-Paul kept his distance from the team since the accident except for a meeting with the Giants on September 7th and a second meeting with team officials that began on Monday. Team medical personnel have examined Pierre-Paul’s permanently-damaged right hand and believe he can now return to the playing field. They did not after the first meeting in September.

“We all are excited to see Jason,” said General Manager Jerry Reese. “He has worked very hard to get himself back into position to join the team and work toward getting on the playing field on Sundays.”

“I’m very excited to be back,” said Pierre-Paul. “I’m getting ready to do what I have to do. I’ve been training down in South Florida with my trainer. Every day, I got up at 7:30 and lifted weights, I’ve been doing what I have to do to stay in football shape.”

“I feel younger,” replied Pierre-Paul when asked how he felt. “I’m just here to help the team out. I’m blessed to play the game, and I’m excited about the opportunity to play again.”

Pierre-Paul has never played for Defensive Coordinator Steve Spagnuolo, so his complicated defensive schemes and terminology will be new to him. Pierre-Paul also has not practiced since December 2014. There is not much time as the Giants are almost halfway through the 2015 regular season with just nine games left to play.

“It is just good to have Jason back in our building,” said Head Coach Tom Coughlin. “You can feel his energy and his desire to overcome what he has had to endure since July. His spirit is undeniable, and he is anxious to get to work with (Defensive Line Coach) Robert Nunn and Spags, as well as our medical and strength and conditioning people.”

Oct 272015
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Jason Pierre-Paul, New York Giants (December 28, 2014)

Jason Pierre-Paul – © USA TODAY Sports Images

According to press reports, defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul and the New York Giants are in negotiations on a 1-year contract that would reduce his pro-rated, 1-year, $8.7 million Franchise tender (minus $6.1 million for the seven games he has missed) to an incentive-laden deal. The contract would likely prevent the Giants from placing Pierre-Paul on the Non-Football Injury (NFI) List, ensuring that Pierre-Paul would be paid. ESPN is reporting that Pierre-Paul could return to the playing field by Week 10 or Week 12 (the Giants have a bye during Week 11). FOX Sports is reporting that Pierre-Paul could be back on the field by Week 10.

Press reports say that Head Coach Tom Coughlin, General Manager Jerry Reese, and Defensive Line Coach Robert Nunn met with Pierre-Paul on Monday. In addition, Pierre-Paul was examined by team medical personnel who have apparently have determined that Pierre-Paul is physically capable of playing football again this season.

Newsday and have reported that Pierre-Paul’s injuries to his right hand from the July 4th fireworks accident include an amputated index finger, the loss of portions of his middle finger and thumb, and fractures to his thumb. Pierre-Paul also had extensive burns that required multiple skin grafts. Other concerns include Pierre-Paul not being able to adequately weight train due to the injuries and corresponding loss of strength and mass, his not practicing since December 2014, and his unfamiliarity with new Defensive Coordinator Steve Spagnuolo’s system.

“There is no timetable set for me just yet,” WR Victor Cruz told reporters on Monday. “I meet with the doctors again this Thursday and take it from there. I feel better and I know that I’m progressing because the previous MRI showed the area of discomfort has gotten a lot smaller. Hopefully that trend continues and I’ll be out there sooner or later.”

Cruz has not completed a full practice since August 17 due to his injured calf. Cruz experienced a setback when attempting to practice on September 30.

As is usually the case, the Giants worked out a number of street free agents on Tuesday. Those reportedly working out for the team included place kickers Kyle Brindza, Zach Hocker, Corey Acosta, and Tom Obarski.

The audio of Monday’s WFAN Radio interview with quarterback Eli Manning is available on CBS New York’s website.

A sights and sounds video from the Giants’ 27-20 victory over the Dallas Cowboys is now available at


The players return to practice on Wednesday to start preparing for Sunday’s game against the New Orleans Saints.

Oct 262015
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According to multiple press reports, defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul is meeting with the New York Giants today. Pierre-Paul will supposedly allow team doctors to examine his severely-damaged right hand for second time since his July 4th fireworks accident. The original meeting with the team was on September 7th. Pierre-Paul believes he can play now but it remains to be seen if the Giants agrees. ESPN is reporting that the Giants discussed reducing Pierre-Paul’s current Franchise tender (approximately $871,000 per week) in September, but Pierre-Paul refused.

Tom Coughlin addressed the media by conference call on Monday:

Good afternoon. Just a couple thoughts about yesterday afternoon’s game. The significance of the plus-four turnovers and the fact that we had no turnovers on offense or special teams was obviously huge in the game. We only had three penalties in the game, all three on defense, all three on the same drive. We had a defensive touchdown, a special teams touchdown. And we had a spark, which I thought was very, very instrumental in our ability to win the game. The spark being, one, DRC and his two interceptions which we talked about, it could have been three. And he had the sideline with the first one, too, if he had been able to hang on to the ball. But his defensive touchdown there was a real spark. Dwayne Harris, his kickoff return was a real spark. He also had a nice tackle on special teams as well. He had a 38-yard pass play which put us in outstanding field position right as we got close to the end of the first half. I thought that our offensive line play and rushing for 132, which was the first time we’d been over that mark this year, but I thought we had some good, physical runs. And I thought Orleans Darkwa gave us a spark. There were a lot of things in the game, as I told the players this morning. We’re real happy today because we won the game. We knew, in the division, the kind of game it was going to be.

We had speculated 35 plus runs in the game, and actually Dallas had 41 runs and they were very good at it. They got after us pretty good in the run game. We knew the physicality of the game, the talent of the defensive team of Dallas, the talent of the kicker and the punter, in particular, and the talent of their offensive line. It had to be the best rushing game that McFadden’s had in quite some while, but you can see the acceleration and the speed—how that fits what they’re trying to do with their offensive team as they go forward. There were many things that we need to do a much better job of. Again, I thought there was a critical drive where we had the ball after coming off our minus-one yard line. We had the ball in a position where scoring a touchdown there would have been key. We were not able to do that. That little bit about the green-zone does continue to bother me. Even though we were running the ball pretty well in that sequence, we didn’t score.

We won the game, we’re excited about winning the game. There’s a lot of things we can do better. We congratulated our team and then, as we always do, we talked about the areas that must be improved, because improvement is the key. We talk about that every week as we get ready to play—we want to play better than we played the week before, each week. It kind of goes back and forth but in this game I thought the major contributions of all three phases and how they complemented each other was radically different from the experience we had down in Philadelphia. So we’re happy to win, we have a lot of work to do.

Q: The last three games or so, the run defense has given up, I think, over 100 yards to the opponents. What have you seen to be the difference these last three games versus earlier when you were holding opponents to under 100 yards?

A: We made some mistakes in terms of our responsibilities and how we play certain aspects of the run. There were some things that Dallas did coming off of a bye week, which you knew was going to happen. They introduced a couple of different thoughts in there. By in large, they blocked us and we’ve got to find a way—and they’re a good offensive team, don’t get me wrong—but we’ve got to do a better job of holding the point, of being where we’re supposed to be from a gap responsibility, of recognizing the style run that’s coming. We lost leverage on the corner consistently. One of the reasons was that as much as you want to tell somebody how fast an individual is, McFadden did just run around us a few times. When he hit a couple of plays off-tackle, we were holding our breath there to try to get him down, particularly when he got started through the line of scrimmage. It’s a number of things—they blocked very well, we were sometimes out of position, and sometimes not maintaining our leverage and our contain responsibilities. Our tackling at times was shoddy. We didn’t get away with block tackles, which you don’t like to see anyway, but some of the people in the secondary were trying to implement that and it wasn’t successful. There’s a bunch of reasons why.

Q: This wasn’t Eli’s most prolific passing game, but he avoided the costly mistake. Can you talk a little about the offensive line’s ability to protect him and keep Dallas out of the backfield?

A: We knew the type of rush we were going to get. We knew how important it was to get the ball off. You adjust your style of play when that’s the case and we did that. The offensive line did a good job of that. There were occasions where I thought that Eli really demonstrated a learning experience when he was under pressure and really had no place to go with the ball and thought more about taking care of the ball than trying to find a way to get us back to the line of scrimmage. Both times he secured the ball to his body and went down. Nobody likes to see that, but it’s much better than a turnover or a penalty. I thought that he did an outstanding job of that. He made an outstanding throw down the sideline to hit Rueben Randle. He made a couple of key throws at key times. Really I thought there was probably one opportunity in the green zone that we did not take advantage of, for whatever reason. He managed the game very well, he made a number of adjustment calls at the line of scrimmage—had a lot to do with more run game than perhaps at any other time this year. From the standpoint of the guy who was in charge of the game and directed the game etc. etc., he did an outstanding job.

Q: Do you think going forward you’ll need more production, more explosion out of that passing game to sustain success?

A: Oh, I think so. I don’t think there’s any doubt about that. The issue that we’re having is obvious. We’ve got some guys that are not able to practice full-time and it’s difficult when there’s not practice time to go ahead and just go out on the field Sunday afternoon and play as if you’ve had all those days and those opportunities that you normally get throughout the course of the week where you communicate well. Particularly if you’re introducing something a little bit different, you don’t have that. That’s a little bit of an issue right now and hopefully we can overcome it.

Q: Going back to the running backs for a moment. Obviously you knew what Orleans Darkwa could do, but having seen it now, you have four running backs who can really give you production in the running game. So how do you approach the responsibilities moving forward or how do you use these guys? Do you stick with that committee?

A: Well, committee is a word that—we’re fortunate to have four guys that can play. And of those four guys that can and do play, they also have special teams commitments, which is a huge plus for our team as well. We have a number of guys who have game experience, who some of which have different roles and they’ll continue in those roles, and they will continue to help us on special teams.

Q: Do you think it’s realistic though to use all four guys running the ball every week or is that something you’re going to have to pare down at some point?

A: I think right now it depends on the plan and the type of game we expect and how we strategize and plan on using. But the four healthy guys…that’s a great thing, believe me. When you look around at the different positions, four guys that continue to maintain good health, that helps an awful lot.

Q: What did you see from Darkwa during the week that gave you confidence to put him in there?

A: He had an outstanding preseason. So during the course of the week, he had some carries in first and second down. The coaches felt strongly that he should be given an opportunity. It wasn’t right away in the game, but eventually he played and he played well.

Q: What would you say to the idea that yesterday was not an impressive win or that perhaps you were lucky to win that game?

A: The luck part…there’s a lot of hard work that went into winning that game. It had nothing to do with luck, it had to do with us being in the right spot at the right time. Again, I attribute that to the turnovers and to the lack of penalties and us not turning it over—that’s not luck, there’s a lot of hard work involved in that. So we won the football game, we won it in a forthright manner. I’m not overly concerned with any of those other comments.

Q: As part of an answer yesterday, you mentioned, “Especially when no one thinks you can do it” type of attitude. Does that fuel your group?

A: Occasionally, it does. It’s a known fact that starting out 0-2 and then not playing as well as we had hoped in Philadelphia created more of that. If that is the case, then that’s a position we’ll take. You have to prove the doubters wrong.

Q: Seven games into the season, you’re almost to the midway point, what do you feel like you can hang your hat on with the team? What area of this team—

A: We play hard. We play hard. We play hard, it’s not always pretty. I think that with the kickoff return, the way in which our punt team has operated—it’s unfortunate that we had two touchbacks yesterday, we need to take just a little bit off of that. Balls hit at the one and I think around the three, you need to back that off a little bit to get that ball down inside the 10. But I think we can count on that going forward as well. But we have a bunch of guys who love the game, like what they’re doing, and play hard. That’s a  pretty good starting point. Effort is a great starting point for anything. By in large, I think we’re getting very good effort.

Q: By not listing like one of the facets of the offense or defense, are you still learning about what these units are though?

A: No, no. No.

Q: The kickoff return by Dwayne Harris obviously was a big play in that fourth quarter, a momentum changer. How good did you feel for him having such a big moment against his former team?

A: I didn’t consider that part, I considered it a good moment for our team. When he came screaming out of there, we had an entire sideline of people who were not only inspired by it, but they were extremely happy and not worried about showing our joy. We were excited about that.

Q: Tom, are you expecting to meet with Jason Pierre-Paul in the next day or so?

A: Am I?

Q: Do you or the doctors…is he due in to meet you guys?

A: Again, I told you that I would respond as soon as I knew in fact that it had taken place or that Jason was here. To my knowledge, he’s not here at this point in time. When he does, we’ll let you know. And it’s all going to start with the medical.

Q: Do you expect Damontre Moore to be back this week? And if there was any message intended on your part, do you think it was received?

A: Well, again, that stays between the player and I. Damontre Moore is a skilled athlete who we’ll again look at the plan and see exactly where we stand. If we can include him, then we will.

Transcripts of Monday’s media conference calls with the following players:


The players are off Tuesday and return to practice on Wednesday to start preparing for Sunday’s game against the New Orleans Saints.

Oct 252015
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Jonathan Casillas, New York Giants (October 25, 2015)

Jonathan Casillas – © USA TODAY Sports Images

It wasn’t pretty, but the New York Giants found a way to win a game where they were very much out-played on both lines of scrimmage on Sunday at MetLife Stadium as the Giants defeated the Cowboys 27-20. With the victory, the Giants improved their overall record to 4-3 and their divisional record to 2-2.

The Cowboys vastly out-gained the Giants in first downs (27-13), third-down efficiency (55 percent to 27 percent), total net yards (460 to 289), net yards rushing (233 to 132), net yards passing (227 to 157), and time of possession (38:04 to 21:56). But the Giants won the turnover battle (4 to 0) and scored touchdowns on defense and special teams.

The Giants received the football to start the game, picked up a couple of first downs, but were then forced to punt. The Cowboys drove 68 yards in 11 plays on their first possession but settled for a 30-yard field goal to go up 3-0 early.

After both teams exchanged punts, the Giants scored their only offensive touchdown of the game by marching 79 yards in seven plays to take a 7-3 lead on running back Orleans Darkwa’s 15-yard touchdown run. The Cowboys immediately cut into that advantage after the ensuing kickoff went out-of-bounds and the Cowboys managed to gain 30 yards in six plays to set up a 48-yard field goal. Giants 7 – Cowboys 6.

The Giants went three-and-out on their ensuing possession and Dallas then regained the lead by driving 72 yards in just six plays. The drive was aided by three defensive penalties and culminated with a 1-yard touchdown run by running back Darren McFadden, who would finish the game with 152 yards rushing on 29 carries. Cowboys 13 – Giants 7.

With 2:17 to go before halftime, the Giants did manage to cut into that score with an 8-play, 51-yard drive that set up a 47-yard field goal by place kicker Josh Brown. The big play on the drive was a 38-yard pass from quarterback Eli Manning to wide receiver Dwayne Harris. At the half, the Cowboys led 13-10.

The Cowboys received the football to start the second half and turned it over on their first three possessions after the break. First, cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie picked off quarterback Matt Cassel at the Giants’ 42-yard line and returned the interception 58 yards for the defensive score. The Giants were now up 17-13.

Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, New York Giants (October 25, 2015)

Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Dallas crossed midfield on their second possession but a deep pass by Cassel was underthrown and intercepted by safety Brandon Meriweather at the Giants’ 1-yard line. Aided by a 44-yard reception by wide receiver Rueben Randle and a 39-yard run by running back Shane Vereen, the Giants were able to extend their lead to 20-13 on Josh Brown’s 34-yard field goal.

Cassel threw his third interception of the game on the Cowboys’ third possession of the half. Rodgers Cromartie picked off his second pass of the game at the Giants’ 22-yard line and returned it 12 yards on the first play of the fourth quarter. The Giants picked up only one first down and were forced to punt. Dallas then proceeded to tie the game at 20-20 by driving 80 yards in nine plays with Cassel finding wide receiver Devin Street for a 25-yard touchdown midway through the final quarter.

Then came the play of the game when Dwayne Harris returned the ensuing kickoff 100 yards for the game-winning touchdown.

Dwayne Harris, New York Giants (October 25, 2015)

Dwayne Harris – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Dallas still had two opportunities to tie the game. The Cowboys drove from their own 31-yard line to the Giants’ 30-yard line with just over two minutes to play. After two plays picked up no yards, the Cowboys went for it on 4th-and-8 but failed to convert when tight end James Hanna was stopped two yards short of the first-down marker.

The Giants were not able to run out the clock but they did force the Cowboys to spend all three of their timeouts before punting. Brad Wing’s punt was muffed by Dallas returner Cole Beasley and recovered by Giants’ wide receiver Myles White with 1:26 to play. The Giants then knelt on the ball to win the game.

Manning finished the game 13-of-24 for 170 yards, 0 touchdowns, and 0 interceptions. The leading receivers were wideout Odell Beckham (4 catches for 35 yards), tight end Larry Donnell (4 catches for 18 yards), Randle (2 catches for 68 yards), and Harris (2 catches for 43 yards). The leading rushers were Vereen (4 carries for 56 yards) and Darkwa (8 carries for 48 yards).

Rodgers-Cromartie had two interceptions, one for a touchdown. Meriweather had the other interception. Linebacker Jon Beason led the team with 11 tackles. Defensive end Georgie Selvie and defensive tackle Markus Kuhn shared the team’s only sack. Selvie was credited with three quarterback hits and defensive Robert Ayers with two.

Video highlights/lowlights and post-game locker room celebration are available at

CB Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie (finger) and DE Robert Ayers Jr. (concussion evaluation) left the game but returned. DE Owamagbe Odighizuwa (hamstring) and LB J.T. Thomas (ankle) were both injured during the game and did not return.

Transcripts and video clips of post-game media sessions with Head Coach Tom Coughlin and the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at

Inactive for the Giants were WR Victor Cruz (calf), LB Uani ‘Unga (neck), CB Prince Amukamara (pectoral), CB Brandon McGee (back), DE Damontre Moore, DT Louis Nix, and OT Bobby Hart.

The Giants broke a five-game losing streak to Dallas. It was their first home victory vs. the Cowboys since January 1, 2012, the night they clinched the NFC East title on their way to Super Bowl XLVI.

The Giants have won their first two NFC East home games for the first time since 2009.

This was first game in which the Giants scored on both an interception return and a kickoff return since November 4, 1951. Tom Landry returned an interception 55 yards for a touchdown, and Emlen Tunnell brought back a kickoff 100 yards for another score in a 37-31 victory over the New York Yanks.

The Giants rushed for 132 yards, their first 100-yard game since they ran for 128 yards at St. Louis on December 21, 2014. They had not rushed for 100 yards in seven consecutive games, and had been the only NFL team without a 100-yard rushing game this season.

The Giants did not commit a turnover in two games vs. the Cowboys this season.

Tom Coughlin and Eli Manning each reached milestones with the victory. Coughlin won his 100th regular-season game with the Giants, and Manning his 95th. Coughlin joined Hall of Famer Steve Owen as the only coaches in the 91-season history of the franchise to reach 100 regular-season victories. Owen had 153 victories from 1930-53. Manning’s 95th regular-season victory tied Phil Simms’ franchise record. The veteran quarterback and team captain presented a game ball to Coughlin in the postgame locker room.

Coughlin became the seventh coach in NFL history with at least 100 victories and at least two Super Bowl wins with one franchise. The others are Bill Belichick, Joe Gibbs, Tom Landry, Chuck Noll, Mike Shanahan, and Don Shula.

Harris tied the franchise record for longest kickoff return touchdown. Tunnell returned a kickoff 100 yards vs. the New York Yankees on November 4, 1951, and Clarence Childs matched him against Minnesota on December 6, 1964. It was Harris’ first career kickoff return touchdown.

Josh Brown kicked field goals of 47 and 34 yards. He has now made 19 consecutive field goal attempts, breaking the team record of 17 he set from October 6 – December 29, 2013.