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New York Giants (July 21, 2014)

2014 Giants participate in the conditioning test – Photo by Connor Hughes

JULY 21, 2014 NEW YORK GIANTS TRAINING CAMP REPORT:

After a 31-day break, the New York Giants reported to East Rutherford for the first day of the team’s training camp. Well, sort of. Day 1′s events included three hours of meetings, a conditioning test followed by three hours of meetings.

Below you will find a few observations from the conditioning test. There really isn’t much to gather from a conditioning tests – literally the players just run 40-yard sprint/jogs – so this mostly is just updating certain situations.

Chris Snee, New York Giants (July 21, 2014)

Chris Snee with son, Cooper, following his retirement press conference – Photo by Connor Hughes

SETTING THE STAGE:

  • The Giants waived wide receiver Kris Adams following a failed physical and signed guard John Sullen.
  • Giants’ coach Tom Coughlin said that there was nothing to be upset about in regards to anyone that reported for camp. A few players reported a ‘pound or two’ overweight, but Coughlin assured everyone that will be lost the first few days of camp.

CONDITIONING TEST:

Just a background on exactly what the conditioning test is:

  • Players line up in lines based on their position. A coach then stands at the other end of the field roughly 40-50 yards away. Players then need to run from one end of the line, to the coach, in a specific amount of time. Every player ran at a brisk jog.
  • No player struggled much during the conditioning drill. Mike Patterson was sucking a little wind, but nothing to be alarmed with. He’s a big guy, not very often he’s running down the field 50 yards with 30-second/minute breaks.
  • Jon Beason did not participate in the conditioning test in any facet, as was expected. Beason was walking around without any noticeable limp and stood with trainers as teammates went throughout the drill. Eli Manning also did not participate, he threw on the side. Don’t be alarmed, Coughlin said he didn’t run last year, either.
  • All of the players the Giants have on their roster reported. No hold outs.
  • David Wilson, William Beatty and Mario Manningham all completed the conditioning test fully. Beatty ran well, no limp and was in front of the pack. John Jerry stretched, but did not run.
  • Couglin spoke after the conditioning test and said that Wilson, Beatty, Manningham and Jerry have been ‘fully cleared’ medically and none will be placed on the Physically Unable to Perform (PUP) list. With that being said, all will be limited. Coughlin did not give a definition of what ‘limited’ means saying, ‘I don’t even know.’
  • During the running, it looked like Charles James and (I believe) Trindon Holliday engaged in a bit of race. Holliday got the best of James which led to some words from teammates and coaches. James claimed he didn’t get the best ‘jump’ out of the gate.

The Giants’ first practice (albeit without pads) will be tomorrow at 1:20. Players will be made available to the media 11:15 am-12:15 pm. Practice is scheduled for 1:20 pm and will run just under two hours. Tom Coughlin will speak to the media after practice.

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Chris Snee, New York Giants (August 22, 2012)

Chris Snee has said goodbye to the New York Giants – © USA TODAY Sports Images

He’d already given the speech to his teammates and coaches. The announcement was confirmed. After 10 years in the NFL, Chris Snee was walking away.

Chris Snee, New York Giants (December 11, 2011)

Chris Snee – © USA TODAY Sports Images

But as he climbed to the top of a podium overlooking the practice fields he’d spent countless hours on, something changed. The smile left his face as realization set in. This made it official.

Snee began to speak, got a few words out, then the Giants’ iron man broke down.

He brought his hand to the crest of his nose and rubbed his eyes, took a deep breath and attempted to speak again. A few more words, then the giant hand came right back as his eyes swelled with tears. He hung his head.

“It’s a bitter-sweet day,” Snee said between tears, “But one that I really had no choice in. It’s no secret, I’m going to retire.”

For the first time since he was drafted in 2004, Snee couldn’t do it anymore. His body had failed him. No time in the trainer’s room and no amount of ice could fix the physical tolls of a decade in a league where the average career lasts just over three years. It finally caught up to him. At 32 years old, Snee needed to hang up the cleats.

The decision to walk away was one Snee knew was coming. After struggling to play baseball with his son,  it was time. But that didn’t make this press conference any easier.

With every word Snee attempted to utter out, memories came flooding in. There were the locker room pranks he played on teammates with former Giants’ Rich Seubert, Shaun O’Hara, David Diehl and Kareem McKenzie. There were the two Super Bowl championships and four Pro Bowls, too.

Then there was also the memory of his last game as a Giant, a 38-0 defeat at the hands of the Carolina Panthers. Snee was removed from the game before its culmination and placed on injured reserve days later.

Chris Snee, New York Giants (November 25, 2012)

OG Chris Snee – © USA TODAY Sports Images

In the offseason, the former All-Pro guard had hip and elbow surgery and began rehab. Snee didn’t want that “Carolina game” to be the final time he stepped foot on the field as a member of the Giants.

“I sat down with (Giants general manager) Jerry Reese and told him my intentions,” Snee said. “I asked him if he thought I could still play and he said yes. He gave me the opportunity to work this spring and see if my body would hold up. It was doing great.”

Snee began the spring as a full participant in the Giants’ offseason conditioning program, but as the regular season neared ever close, so did the thought that his fairy tale ending would never come to fruition.

Snee’s elbow flared up, prohibiting him from working out. The one who once held the title as the strongest on the Giants saw that strength slipping away. What once made him arguably the NFL’s best guard was no long a talent in his repertoire.

Practice came and went as Snee remained stationed on the sideline. His signature No. 76 jersey was still seen on the field, but not in the huddle. The guard kept his helmet by his side as he watched practice as a spectator.

“In May it was great. I was feeling good,” Snee said. “Then it went south in a hurry. I was going to be honest like I said I would. I wouldn’t be able to play the game I would expect and wouldn’t have been proud of the product I put on the field.

“I let Jerry Reese know, probably at the end of June, what I was leaning towards doing and made it official a couple days ago.”

On Saturday, Snee took a trip to the Giants’ facilities with his family in tow. The group made their way to coach and father-in-law Tom Coughlin’s office where his son, Cooper, ran in to see his grandfather.

“I got this little tap on my back,”Coughlin said. “We visited for a couple minutes and then Chris asked if he could speak to me… and I knew.”

Chris Snee, New York Giants (February 5, 2012)

Chris Snee won two Super Bowl’s with the Giants – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Coughlin then called Reese, along with owners John Mara and Steve Tisch. Snee, meanwhile, made a call of his own.

In 2004, Snee was the Giants’ second-round pick. Their first was quarterback Eli Manning. Throughout both of their rookie years, Manning and Snee were roommates, buss-mates and plane-mates. Their relationship grew over the years and the last thing Snee wanted was for Manning to find out when he arrived at the team’s practice facility on Monday.

So, on Sunday, Snee phoned his old friend.

“We’ve been through a lot together,” Snee said. “We have a special relationship. We’ve been through a lot, two championships and just becoming great friends by the end of this. I thought he had the right to know before everyone else did.”

When Snee was placed on the injured reserve last year and struggled this spring, Manning continued to tell himself it was just a bump in the road for Snee. At the end of the day, when Manning lined up under center it would be his friend just to his right when it counted. Whenever the thought of life without Snee came into his mind, Manning quickly pushed it back out.

He didn’t want to think about it. Didn’t want to imagine it. But when his phone rang, there was something inside that told Manning this was it.

“I had a feeling that that might be what was coming,” Manning said. “You never really thought it would happen. I didn’t want to think about it happening because he’s been such a tremendous teammate and a great friend of mine.”

As Snee walks away, so too does the final piece of one of the greatest offensive lines assembled throughout the Giants’ history. Four nearly five years, O’Hara, Diehl, Seubert and McKenzie paved the way for running backs while keeping defenders off Manning.

O’Hara and Seubert retired in 2010. McKenzie hung up the cleats in 2011 and David Diehl after last year.

“I heard from all of them,” Snee said. “That was a special group we had. One we should’ve cherished more when we were together. Those are my brothers. I thought that I would be able to hang on a little bit longer and they’re still living through me.

“Richie called me four times since midnight. He’s in California, so he’s not sleeping much. Shaun, the same, and Dave. We’ve always had each other’s back and that’s not going to change.”

In 2008, the group paved the way for two 1,000 yard running backs in the same season for the first time in Giants’ history. Brandon Jacobs rushed for 1,059 and Derrick Ward 1,025.

Chris Snee, New York Giants (July 21, 2014)

Chris Snee with son, Cooper, following his retirement press conference – Photo by Connor Hughes

“We had fun,” Snee said. “It was just a fun group to be around, but also when we hit the field, it was work.”

While Snee admitted he’ll be taking some time off and enjoying an August where he doesn’t have to “strap on a helmet,” eventually he hopes to return to football as a coach. Maybe, on one of his son’s teams.

But whether it’s back to the gridiron or another adventure, Snee will be spending more time with his family. His wife, Kate, and sons, Dylan and Cooper, were on hand for Snee’s final press conference.

When Snee stepped off the podium, Cooper ran up to his dad and gave him a hug.

“How old are you now, Dad,” Cooper asked his father.

“Same age as yesterday, Buddy,” Snee said, laughing, before pulling him close again.

Chris Snee Interviews: Transcripts, audio, and video of New York Giants offensive guard Chris Snee discussing his retirement from the NFL are available from the following sources:

John Mara and Tom Coughlin on Chris Snee: Transcripts and video clips of the following team officials discussing the retirement of Chris Snee are available from Giants.com:

 

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Chris Snee, New York Giants (February 5, 2012)

Chris Snee – © USA TODAY Sports Images


After 10 prolific season in the National Football League, Chris Snee will walk away. The 32-year-old announced Monday that he will retire from the NFL. Snee spent every year of his career with the New York Giants.

The news of his retirement was first reported by ESPN’s Dan Graziano late Sunday afternoon.

After meeting with the Giants this morning, the guard determined his body could no longer endure the physical trials of the NFL. Snee was rehabbing from offseason hip and elbow surgeries that cost him much of the 2013 season.

Snee announced the decision today as the Giants gathered to begin training camp in preparation for the 2014 season.

“I know it’s my time,” Snee said. “Before OTAs started I was confident. I was moving around great and I was strong enough where I felt that I could play and compete. But then once OTAs came around, I had to punch and stop somebody … obviously, we’re not wearing pads. I wasn’t able to do it. Quite frankly, it hurt.  But I thought maybe it was my joint getting used to that again. But the more I tried to do it, it became a concern to me that it wasn’t responding the way it should and actually my (elbow) strength had started to go down in the weight room.

“After those three days of OTAs, my hips were hurting. I was concerned. The elbow is an old joint and the cartilage is gone and the bone is starting to weaken. That being said, I came and I spoke to (general manager) Jerry Reese after OTAs and kind of told him what was coming. He said, ‘Take your time and still continue to work out.’ So I did that and my strength is still going down. That was an indication that I wasn’t strong enough to play. And that’s kind of what my game’s been based upon. I take tremendous pride in the effort that I put in the weight room and being the strongest player on the field. I’m nowhere near that, so I knew that even if I came here today, I wouldn’t be able to practice. You’re trying to catch up and I’ve been trying to get my strength back, but I think it’s time to just let the arm cool down.

“I’m thankful to the Giants for giving me this opportunity to try to come back, but I also told them, I told Jerry Reese face-to-face, that I would give him an honest evaluation and I’m a man of my word. I would not be able to help the team the way that I expect of myself or the way that they would expect of me.

“I am proud of where I am today,” said Snee. “To come from a small town in Pennsylvania (Montrose) where nobody thought (I would be an NFL player). When I said I wanted to play pro football at a young age, I was serious. And then when I played high school ball, I said, ‘I want to be the first guy from my high school to go to a Division 1 college,’ and I was able to do that. Along every step there were doubters, I’m sure that’s the case with everyone, I’m not trying to make my situation unique. I’ve always been a guy, I like to prove people wrong. I just always have been a guy who has had high goals for myself and really never satisfied until I get them. I’m extremely proud, but also extremely sad.”

“It’s going to be weird,” Snee said of no longer playing. “I bought season tickets a couple years ago. I don’t think I’ll be ready to sit in those seats just yet – but yeah, I’ll be here. I still have some older friends remaining on the team and some of the young guys I’ve gotten to know. I’ll be rooting for them.”

For the better part of nine years, the former second-round pick was one of the top guards throughout the league. Snee’s agility gave him a unique ability to pull and helped create daylight for the likes of Tiki Barber, Ahmad Bradshaw and Brandon Jacobs. In 2008, Snee was part of an offensive line that paved the way for two 1,000-yard rushing backs as Jacobs rushed for 1,089 yards and Derrick Ward 1,025.

Snee will be remembered as one of the top offensive lineman to ever wear a Giants’ uniform. The 32-year-old was selected to the Pro Bowl four times (2008, 2009, 2010, 2012) and earned All-Pro honors three times (2008, 2009, 2010.) Snee was also a member of the Giants’ Super Bowl championships in 2007 and 2011.

“I think Chris was everything you could ever hope for in a player: toughness, integrity, and a lot of pride,” said New York Giants President and CEO John Mara. “Winning mattered to him. I think he set a great example for all of the other players. He’s somebody we’re going to miss very much. He was one of the greatest offensive linemen in Giants history, and he’ll be on that Ring of Honor someday.

“Chris has been a great Giant, on and off the field,” said Giants Chairman and Executive Vice President Steve Tisch. “And that is the highest compliment we can pay somebody around here.”

“Chris is a pro’s pro,” said General Manager Jerry Reese. “He played the game right. He was as tough and prideful as they come. We will miss him.”

“To me, he was the best guard in all of football,” Coughlin said. “No doubt. No matter who you put him against, all of the great defensive tackles in the game, the 350 (pound) guys, the 340 guys, he blocked them. When he first came here, he was so, so committed and so driven to excel at the professional level as he had excelled at the collegiate level (at Boston College)…(This retirement is) different because not only is it a great football player retiring from the game, who has contributed so much to our team and our franchise and has two world championships to show for it, he is a highly-respected and loved member of (the Coughlin) family.”

“He called me yesterday and told me the news,” QB Eli Manning said. “I kind of knew there was a possibility with everything going on with his health. I’m obviously disappointed just because we’ve had a long run together. We came in the same year, were roommates for home games and away games that first year. We’ve won a lot of games and been through a lot together and been great pals, so I told him I’d miss him. He was the last one from our original class that came in together, but he’s got to do what’s best for him. I think he made a decision kind of based on how he’s feeling and also based on what’s best for the Giants. He’s a true team player and just didn’t think he was going to be able to help and wanted to put us in a situation where we kind of knew that early on. We’re going to definitely miss his leadership and his presence around the locker room, around the team, but we’ll still be great friends.”

With Snee now gone, the competition for who will line up at right guard opening day is now wide open. Brandon Mosley, John Jerry and Giants’ second-round pick Weston Richburg will all see time at the now vacant position.

When Snee missed time during the Giants’ offseason conditioning program, it was Mosley who filled in with the first team. Jerry sat out both the organized team activities and mandatory mini-camp while rehabbing a knee injury.

Mosley was drafted by the Giants in the fourth round of the 2012 NFL Draft while Jerry was signed as a free agent this year from Miami.

No matter who comes out on top for the Giants’ this offseason, it’ll be the team’s most youthful offensive line in quite some time. No projected started is over 30 years old. William Beatty is the oldest at 29.

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David Wilson and David Diehl, New York Giants (August 24, 2013)

David Wilson (22) has received medical clearance to return to the field – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Throughout this offseason, New York Giants’ running back David Wilson talked over and over about his injured neck. He reiterated there was no pain, no limitation. All he needed was a photo to assure doctors he was good to go.

It got to the point where he refused to address it anymore, telling reporters at the team’s mandatory mini-camp he wouldn’t answer any questions about his neck. This afternoon, he’ll be fielding another Q and A. But unlike before, he won’t have an issue with the subject of his neck.

Wilson announced via twitter that he has received medical clearance to resume all football related activities.

The news of Wilson’s clearance completes arguably the most trying time of the former first-round pick’s young career. Last year, Wilson suffered a herniated disc versus the Philadelphia Eagles on Oct. 6. After attempts to wait it out and let it heal on its own failed, Wilson had neck surgery to fuse the vertebrae together on Jan. 16.

The surgery put Wilson’s football career in question.

David Wilson, New York Giants (July 27, 2013)

David Wilson – © USA TODAY Sports Images

“It was hard to worry because I felt nothing,” Wilson said earlier this offseason. “I thought it would be something that would just pass over but then they said I had to have the surgery, it was best to have the surgery. I understood that and I did my research and weighed the pros and cons and felt that it was the best decision.”

After having surgery, Wilson felt himself getting better and better as the days went on. When the Giants reported to East Rutherford for the team’s offseason conditioning program, Wilson took part in the non-contact drills.

There was never a moment a smile wasn’t on Wilson’s face.

“Just staying positive and going out there and still participating,” Wilson said. “I’m trying to focus more on building chemistry with my team and learning this playbook so we can have a better season than we did last year.”

David Wilson, New York Giants (December 9, 2012)

David Wilson – © USA TODAY Sports Images

New York’s first training camp practice will be held Tuesday, July 22 and it’s unclear how much Wilson will participate. Just as cloudy is his role. This offseason, the Giants signed Rashad Jennings and drafted Andre Williams.

While Wilson may not be the team’s featured back, the potential of a thunder-lightning combination with Jennings should put a smile on offensive coordinator Ben McAdoo’s face.

“That’s something we’re going to strive to become,” Jennings said following an OTA practice. “He brings an element to the game that’s unique and special. I think every other running back brings something unique and special to this offense. We’ll see how time plays itself out, but I definitely want every running back to contribute as much as they possible can.”

See what fans are saying about Wilson’s return

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Jerrel Jernigan, New York Giant (November 24, 2013)

What’s in store for Jerrel Jernigan this year? – © USA TODAY Sports Images


Another week, another edition of the Big Blue Breakdown on BigBlueInteractive.com. Today, our panel turns their attention to wide receiver Jerrel Jernigan.

After failing to step foot on the field for the better part of two and a half seasons, Jernigan burst onto the scene towards the end of last year. The former third-round pick caught 19 passes for 237 yards and two touchdowns and also rushed for a 49-yard score.

But where is Jernigan now? Odell Beckham Jr. was drafted, Trindon Holiday signed, Mario Manningham re-signed and Victor Cruz is now healthy. Is there a home for Jernigan; or will he get buried on the depth chart?

Remember, if you’d like to submit a question to be debated on the Big Blue Breakdown, email Connor Hughes (Connor_Hughes@bigblueinteractive.com).

QUESTION- From Jay in Toronto: Is there anything you’ve seen from Jerrel Jernigan so far to make you think he is continuing where he left off at the end of the season, or do you think that was a fluke? What do you see his role being on the team after the Giants drafted Odell Beckham Jr., do you think he can be a big contributor?

CONNOR HUGHES/Big Blue Interactive

Jerrel Jernigan and Victor Cruz, New York Giants (August 10, 2013)

Jerrel Jernigan and Victor Cruz – © USA TODAY Sports Images

It’s tough to see someone ‘flash’ or take much out of non-contact practices. To be honest, Jernigan hasn’t shown much more than Marcus Harris or Trindon Holliday.

With that being said, I’m not terribly sure last year was a fluke. Whether it was or wasn’t, I don’t see where he fits into the offense.

Jernigan plays primarily slot, a position Victor Cruz is most natural in. The Giants drafted Odell Beckham Jr. in the first round to be an ‘outside wide receiver’ with Rueben Randle, leaving Cruz in the middle. Where does that leave Jernigan? The bench.

In the past, the Giants haven’t been big fans of four wide receiver sets, that could change this year, but I see that as the only chance Jernigan has at getting on the field other than injury. It’s not that he can’t play, it’s just I don’t see an open spot for him.

JORDAN RAANAN/NJ.com

Jernigan’s final three games of last season was an eye opener – to the Giants, to the fans and maybe even to himself. It prompted owner John Mara to publicly provide a statement of support in his post-season State of the Giants. Jernigan proved capable of getting open and, most importantly in my mind, an ability to make tough, contested catches despite his size. It had Mara wondering what took so long for the 2011 third-round pick to get on the field, a completely reasonable question considering his performance.

No doubt, Jernigan showed that he can play at this level. He was the No. 2 scoring fantasy wide receiver over the final three weeks of the season with 19 catches, 237 yards and two touchdowns. It was an impressive three-game stretch during the first time in his career that he really received extended playing time.

In my opinion, it wasn’t a fluke. Jernigan (5-8, 189) can play. His biggest problem, however, is that his ideal position is as a slot receiver. That happens to be the spot where the Giants’ top receiver, Victor Cruz, thrives. And Cruz isn’t going anywhere.

Jernigan, even though some of his success last season came on the outside, is better suited for the slot. Once again, he’s unlikely to get that opportunity much this season as long as Cruz is healthy. That leaves him on the outside competing with first-round pick Odell Beckham Jr. and Rueben Randle for playing time. Advantage … first-round pick, and Randle has been ahead of Jernigan on the depth chart since the day he arrived.

So, for now, Jernigan looks like an insurance policy rather than a significant contributor. He’ll be the backup plan in case something happens to Cruz, Beckham and Randle.

EDWARD VALENTINE/Big Blue View

Jerrel Jernigan, New York Giants (August 7, 2013)

Jerrel Jernigan – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Jernigan is a big question mark for me, to be honest. I thought John Mara’s end of season comment that “I’m not sure why it took us three years to find out that Jerrel Jernigan can play,” was made out of frustration and was really unfair to both Tom Coughlin and Kevin Gilbride. Fact is, the Giants had given Jernigan opportunities over the years, and he had continually come up short.

Jernigan has the elusiveness to be a punt returner, but can’t consistently catch the ball. He has the ability to be a kickoff returner, but fumbled that chance away last year.

As a receiver, he is a slot guy and Victor Cruz is better. If Jernigan was better than Cruz, he would have been playing. If he was better on the outside than Hakeem Nicks, Reuben Randle or Mario Manningham before he left for the San Francisco 49ers he would have been playing. Fact is, he wasn’t.

Now, as for what to expect from him this season I just don’t know. Are we going to see the guy who caught 13 passes in his first 29 NFL games, of 19 in his last three? I think we will see a guy who has figured that, yes, he can play in the NFL. Do I think he will be a star? No. It will be interesting to see if he can get open if the Giants ask him to play on the outside more, or if Ben McAdoo will find ways to pair him with Cruz on the inside. It will also be interesting to see how many snaps Jernigan plays, since he is likely the No. 4 wide receiver.

I would think the Giants would be thrilled with 35-45 catches from Jernigan in 2014.

RALPH VACCHIANO/Daily News

Well first, there’s nothing we’ve really seen from Jerrel Jernigan since the end of last season that would be able to really tell us anything. The few practices the media have attended have been light practices and the Giants are obviously busy installing a new offense, so it’s hard to really analyze him. Probably the biggest tell about his status, though, is that they drafted a receiver in the first round. If they were comfortable with him as their third receiver, I’m not sure they would have done that. So the simple answer is this: Barring injury, his role is as the fourth receiver at best, behind Victor Cruz, Rueben Randle and Beckham.

Jerrel Jernigan, New York Giants (December 9, 2012)

Jerrel Jernigan – © USA TODAY Sports Images

I don’t know if I’d label his end of the season a fluke, though. It wasn’t the one-game flash we used to see from Ramses Barden. It was an impressive, three-game stretch. I don’t know that he’ll get that type of opportunity again, but I think it showed that he can be useful and productive in the right situations. He can be a weapon, and that’s important in this pass-happy era. A fourth receiver isn’t a huge part of an offense (when everyone is healthy) but it’s another player the defense needs to worry about. He showed speed, an ability to play above his 5-8 height, and the ability to get open and do something after the catch.

So maybe the Giants will occasionally work him into the slot, either to spell Cruz or to let Cruz do more on the outside. Maybe he’s just a change-of-pace guy for certain plays, depending on how he fits into Ben McAdoo’s scheme. Maybe he’s mostly on the field in spread formations (which would be a help so they don’t always have to spread with extra running backs or tight ends). But I think they’ll find a use for him. He probably won’t consistently be the six-catch, 80-yard guy he was at the end of last season, but he could be good for a catch or two per game, he could be a valuable replacement when necessary, and might even have a few big plays in him as the year goes along.

PATTI TRAINA/Inside Football, Bleacher Report, Sports Xchange

Jerrel Jernigan, New York Giants (December 29, 2013)

Jerrel Jernigan – © USA TODAY Sports Images

I’m probably going to be in the minority, but I don’t believe Jernigan is a lock to make the 53-man roster. I think he’s limited to filling two roles on this team, that as a slot receiver and as a return specialist.

Since the fourth and fifth receiver (like the fourth and fifth cornerback, safety, linebacker, etc.) usually needs to be able to contribute something on special teams, I think that Jernigan might be facing an uphill battle to stick if he can’t show that he’s able to do both roles.

I wrote about Jernigan possibly competing as a kickoff receiver for Bleacher Report last week. One thing I’ll add here is he’s had opportunities in each season he’s been in the league to emerge as a return specialist and that’s yet to happen, most likely due to ball security issues.

All it seems to take for head coach Tom Coughlin and special teams coordinator Tom Quinn to replace a return specialist is one strike. When a return specialist has a nine percent fumble rate in his career, that’s not a good stat.

I do not think that both Trindon Holliday, who in case you’re wondering, has an eight percent career fumble rate as a return specialist, and Jernigan are both going to make this roster.

Holliday looked very good during the spring, but we need to temper our enthusiasm because as we all know, there are no pads allowed during the spring.

One other thing that we need to bear in mind is that in Ben McAdoo’s offense, Rueben Randle could very well be the other receiver we see working from the slot (besides Victor Cruz, who’s among the best in the NFL right now working from the slot). I think they like to try to create size mismatches in the slot, and so we’ll see if anything comes out of the talk of Randle seeing more snaps from the slot.

So to answer the last part of the question, no, I don’t see Jernigan being a “big contributor” if he makes this team. I think your “big three” will be Rueben Randle, Cruz and Odell Beckham.

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Eli Manning, New York Giants (August 3, 2012)

BBI Ceremony for Eli Manning

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Jul 202014
 
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Chris Snee and Pat Flaherty, New York Giants (July 27, 2013)

Chris Snee and Pat Flaherty – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Chris Snee May Retire on Monday: A rumor posted on BigBlueInteractive.com that right guard Chris Snee may retire on Monday seems to have some validity as press reports now say Snee with meet with New York Giants team officials on Monday to discuss that very possibility. Players are required to report to training camp at Quest Diagnostics Training Center on Monday as the first training camp practice begins on Tuesday.

Snee has been plagued with hip and elbow issues the last few years, and continued problems with the elbow caused him to sit out a number of Organized Team Activity (OTA) and mini-camp practices. Snee was placed on Injured Reserve in October 2013 with a torn labrum in his right hip that required surgery. He also underwent elbow surgery in November. After the 2011 season, Snee underwent surgery on his elbow and left hip.

Snee was drafted in the 2nd round of the 2004 NFL Draft by the Giants and is one of the few remaining active Giants with two Super Bowl rings. If he does retire, possible replacements at right guard include John Jerry, Brandon Mosley, and Weston Richburg. Jerry was signed in the offseason from the Miami Dolphins but missed all of the offseason work while he was recovering from arthroscopic knee surgery. Mosley was drafted in the 4th round of the 2012 NFL Draft by the Giants and Richburg in the 2nd round of the 2014 NFL Draft.

Jon Beason Injury Update: New York Giants linebacker told Newsday on Sunday that he is recovering well from the right foot injury he suffered during the team’s ninth OTA practice on June 12. Beason suffered a ligament tear and small fracture to the sesamoid bone in his right foot. The injury did not require surgery.

Beason told Newsday that he will not run during Monday’s team conditioning test, but he told the paper that his toe and foot feel great and he could run if he had to. “We’re hitting all those benchmarks in terms of the prognosis,” said Beason. “It’s getting better and better every day.”

Beason was asked if playing the season opener was a possibility. “Absolutely,” replied Beason. “That’s the goal…I’ve had seasons where I didn’t have any training camp and I went out there and got busy right away.”

“I feel fine right now,” said Beason. “But then again I know that I’m not ready to go full speed and change direction and tackle people.”

Article on RB Rashad Jennings: Rashad Jennings: How he trained for his first training camp with the Giants by Jordan Raanan of NJ.com

Article on TE Kellen Davis: 10 Giants you should know when training camp begins: Kellen Davis by Conor Orr of The Star-Ledger