Sep 242014
 
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Eli Manning, New York Giants (December 29, 2013)

Eli Manning – © USA TODAY Sports Images

 

New York Giants at Washington Redskins, September 25, 2014

The New York Giants (1-2) square off against the Washington Redskins (1-2) Thursday evening in New York’s first NFC East matchup.

Prince Amukamara and Stevie Brown, New York Giants (September 8, 2014)

Prince Amukamara and Stevie Brown – © USA TODAY Sports Images

FOUR DOWNS:

First Down
Who plays free safety?
When the Giants released safety Will Hill, it was assumed that Stevie Brown would fill in at free safety after missing all of last season with a knee injury. The last time Brown saw significant playing time, he tied for the league lead in interceptions with eight. Those hopes of yet to materialize this year as Brown has struggled in coverage and has yet to trust the instincts that made him one of the league’s best ball hawks two years ago. Last week versus Houston, Brown was benched.

When Brown exited the lineup, rookie Nat Berhe took his place. This week in practice, Quintin Demps got the first-team reps at free safety. So who will be out there Thursday night? It’ll be interesting to look who steps on the field first, how that player performs and if there is a role for Brown within the defense as a starter. When Brown had his most success, he was allowed to play the ‘Kenny Phillips’ role. Sit back 15-20 yards from the line of scrimmage, watch the quarterbacks eyes and stop anything that goes deep down the field. Brown could be removed as an everyday starter and used in that position instead. All will be shown in Washington.

Second Down
Has the offensive line turned the corner?
With offensive lines, so many times it’s not so much about having the best players, but the players that play best together. The last two games for the Giants have been some of the best in pass protection, and last Sunday versus Houston may have been the best run blocking the team has provided in well over a year. The question now is centered around if Sunday was a mirage, or is that how the line will play on a regular basis. A good, but banged up, Washington defensive front will be a nice test.

Third Down
Does Andre Williams see an increased workload?
Rashad Jennings ran the ball an awful lot last week with immense success. In a game in which he set career highs, Jennings rushed for 176 yards and touched the ball nearly 40 times. In a short turnaround, Jennings’ body may not be fully healed just yet.

Versus Houston, Williams got a few carrie spelling Jennings, but didn’t seem to have the same success. It wasn’t necessarily a knock on Williams, but rather more attributed to the fact Jennings was playing out of his mind. Through three games, Williams hasn’t experienced the same success he found in the preseason, there’s no denying that, but that could also be due to the fact he hasn’t been allowed to get into a rhythm running the ball. Williams comes off as a player that gets stronger as the game goes on. He may have a chance to do just that tomorrow night.

Steve Weatherford (5), Josh Brown (3), New York Giants (December 22, 2013)

Josh Brown Kicks the Game-Winner in Overtime – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Fourth Down
Can the special teams be special?
For the last several years, few units in the NFL has been as porous as the Giants special teams. Be it poor coverage, poor blocking or poor returns, there’s been nothing ‘special’ about the unit. This offseason, it looked like New York made the right changes to fix the group. Trindon Holliday and Quintin Demps were signed while Odell Beckham Jr. was drafted to address the return game. Bennett Jackson was drafted and Zack Bowman signed to fix the coverage unit. Three games in, it’s the same old, same old.

There’s no explosiveness from the return game as Holliday is on the injured reserve and Beckham is dealing with a hamstring. A training camp foot injury hurt Jackson’s shot of making the roster and he’s on the practice squad. Zack Bowman has missed more special teams tackles than he’s made. A lot of criticism has been given to Tom Quinn, some of it warranted, but more needs to go to the players.

Just like the offense, playmakers need to make plays. Demps and Bowman were brought in to do that, but both have been below average three games in.

BREAKING DOWN WASHINGTON:

OFFENSE - by Connor Hughes
Strength?
As bad as it sounds, Robert Griffin III’s dislocated ankle may have been the best thing to happen to Washington this season. In Jay Gruden’s high-octane, go-deep offense, it looks as if former fourth-round pick Kirk Cousins may be better suited to play the offense, at least it’s looking that way right now. In the two games Cousins has played, the quarterback has completed 52-of-81 passes (64.2 percent) and thrown for 677 yards with five touchdowns and one interception. In fact, Cousins’ 427 passing yards last week versus Philadelphia were more than Griffin has ever thrown for in his 30 games played.

Will Hill, New York Giants (October 27, 2013)

DeSean Jackson is now a member of Washington – © USA TODAY Sports Images

While Cousins’ gaudy numbers haven’t exactly been compiled against the league’s best secondaries (Jacksonville/Philly), they’re impressive none the less. The quarterback seems to be thriving in Gruden’s offense and looks far different than the quarterback that started against the Giants in the final game of last season. Then again, having targets like DeSean Jackson and Pierre Garćon to throw the ball to helps. Last year’s final game of the season, one where Cousins completed just 19-of-49 passes for 169 yards with a pair of interceptions, will certainly be on the quarterback’s mind. The key? New York will have to  pressure Cousins and keep him off balance.

Weakness?
There really isn’t a known weakness across the Redskins offense: The have one of the league’s better running backs in Alfred Morris, two good receivers in Garćon and Jackson and a good offensive line that has allowed Cousins to be pressure on just 19 percent of his drop backs. On Thursday night, the Giants will look to find and exploit a potential hole. That could be putting pressure into the face of Cousins. Versus Philadelphia and Jacksonville, Cousins was allowed to drop back and scan the defense with little pressure heading his way. If the Giants can create pressure, either with their front four or blitzes, Cousins may be forced into mistakes. Cousins has a little bit of a reputation as a player who will take some chances. In the 10 games he’s played in, he’s thrown an interception seven.

DEFENSE -by Eric Kennedy
Strength?
The Redskins operate out of a 3-4 on defense and the strength of their defensive team in in their front seven. The Redskins were terrible defensively in 2013, but they retained defensive coordinator Jim Haslett who has mostly done a fine job during his tenure in Washington. Thus far, the Redskins look much improved on defense in 2014. Up front, ex-Cowboy Jason Hatcher is the best pass rusher at RDE. Hatcher has been bothered by a hamstring injury however. NT Chris Baker is filling for the injured Barry Cofield. Jarvis Jenkins is the LDE. The more dangerous players are at OLB with Brian Orakpo (who is dealing with torn ligaments in his left hand) and Ryan Kerrigan. Both can rush the passer and have caused the Giants problems in the past. ILB Perry Riley is an athletic, 3-down player.

Weakness?
It’s the secondary. And it’s weaker now that the Redskins have lost CB DeAngelo Hall – who has caused problems for Eli in the past – for the season. He will be replaced at left corner by rookie Bashaud Breeland. RCB David Amerson has struggled at times. E.J. Biggers is the nickel corner and Victor Cruz should do well against him. The safeties – Brandon Meriweather and Ryan Clark – are veterans who are on the downside of their respective careers.

Larry Donnell, New York Giants (September 14, 2014)

Larry Donnell – © USA TODAY Sports Images

PLAYER TO WATCH:

Connor Hughes -
Larry Donnell
Quickly, Larry Donnell is establishing himself as the complete package at tight end for the Giants. It was always known that Donnell had the ability to be a receiver, but blocking was a huge work in progress. It looks like Donnell, and positional coach Kevin Gilbride, have put in the time to fine-tune Donnell’s craft in that aspect. He took a huge step forward in that area versus Houston and Washington will provide another tough test. Tom Coughlin was hoping someone would step up at the position, someone has.

Eric Kennedy -
Prince Amukamara and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie
These two have the most important match-up battles against Pierre Garçon and DeSean Jackson. With the free safety spot shaky right now, it is critical that both Amakamara and DRC  play well against Washington’s two most explosive play-makers.

FROM THE COACHES’ MOUTH:

Tom Coughlin - (On Kirk Cousins) “All you have to do is put the tape on. Forty-five points, two games. He’s thrown the ball very well – the deep ball, the percentage passes, all kinds of yardage. They’ve done a very nice job in terms of adjusting their style of play and he’s played well.”

Eli Manning, New York Giants (September 21, 2014)

Eli Manning – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Jay Gruden - (On an improved Eli Manning) “Yeah, I think so. That is just my impression of just watching them for the last 23 hours. I would say my impression coming in playing the Giants from playing them a couple years ago and studying them now, I think it is totally different.”

FINAL WORD:

Connor Hughes - 
As good as last week’s win was, it came against the same team that was selecting No. 1 overall in this year’s draft. With that being said, it’s extremely encouraging to see the rate at which the offense is picking up Ben McAdoo’s scheme. Comparing the dysfunctional unit that was on display for four quarters in Detroit, to the way the team has played the last eight, it’s an entirely different unit.

It’s not going to be easy against Washington, but just like the Giants, call the last two games what they are. Kirk Cousins has torched the Jacksonville Jaguars and Philadelphia Eagles. For any that have watched Philly this year, the defense is far from anything close to a dominant force. As for Jacksonville? Well, it’s the same old Jaguars.

The Giants defense will be the toughest Cousins has faced, and with the way the pass rush has faired this season, I think Cousins could be in for a very long day. Not only is the Giants secondary vastly improved, but so to is the pass rush. Damontre Moore looks to be a budding super star, Jason Pierre-Paul is back and Robert Ayers Jr. has been one of the best and most underrated free agent signings. If that pass rush can get into the face of Cousins and force some throws, I wouldn’t be surprised to see another two-to-three interceptions.

The game is going to come down to who turns the ball over, when those turnovers come and who makes less. If Eli Manning is good Eli, the Giants can win this one running away. It’s going to come down to who makes the fewest mistakes. I think that team will be the Giants.
New York 23 – Washington 13

Eric Kennedy - The Giants have to stop the run and make Washington one-dimensional. Offensively, the Giants should be able to do damage against this secondary if they can keep the pass rushers off of Manning. I’m 0-3 on predictions this year. Let’s keep it going.
Redskins 42 – Giants 0

Sep 242014
 
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Victor Cruz, New York Giants (September 21, 2014)

Victor Cruz – © USA TODAY Sports Images

New York Giants 30 – Houston Texans 17

REVISITING: FOUR DOWNS
During our game preview, we listed ‘Four Downs,’ which took a look at the top four questions surrounding the Giants heading into the game. Now that the game has been played and the film reviewed, it’s time to break it down.

First Down
Can the defense get off of the field on 3rd down?
YES! Houston was held to a paltry 2-of-12 (17 percent) on third down and failed on their one offensive 4th down attempt (they converted on a special teams 4th down play).

Second Down
Can the defense force some turnovers?
YES! Three interceptions. One each by Prince Amukamara, Antrel Rolle, and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie. Amukamara and DRC had shots at other passes as well.

Third Down
Can the Giants finally get the ground game going?
Rashad Jennings played like a man possessed Sunday afternoon, running for a career-high 176 yards on 34 carries including a one-yard touchdown. There will be more on this in the positional breakdown, but Jennings truly is a complete back. He can catch the ball, run the ball, but more importantly, he blocks like an offensive lineman.

Fourth Down
Can Eli Manning build on his positive performance from last week?
This sentence may be repeated quite often as the season goes on, but Eli Manning had his best game in the West Coast offense Sunday afternoon. The two-time Super Bowl winning quarterback keeps getting more comfortable and seems to enjoy the dinking-and-dunking the Giants are now doing to work down the field.

OFFENSIVE OVERVIEW by Connor Hughes

The Giants scored 30 points Sunday versus the Texans. The Giants could have scored 50.

Ben McAdoo’s West Coast offense was run near perfectly versus Houston as Manning marched the Giants up and down the field with ease on near every possession. Manning had time to throw, the team’s playmakers made plays and, for the first time all year, the Giants established a running game. It was easily the most complete game for the Giants in the short three-game season.

The one noticeable thing that may have had a lot to do with the Giants ability to run the ball were the formations in which they were running the ball out of. The Giants routinely spaced the field with three wide receivers, then ran the ball right up the gut of the Texans defensive line. Since there were three receivers on the field, the Texans couldn’t come out in their base defense. Playing in a nickel and time package, the Giants offensive line took advantage. It was big guys beating up little guys, with a few highlight plays from Jennings.

Granted, this was the Houston Texans, the same team that was selecting first overall in this year’s draft, but it was very promising to see. For the first time in awhile, the Giants dominated from start to finish.

QUARTERBACK by Connor Hughes

While Manning looked good last week versus the Arizona Cardinals, Sunday may have been the most comfortable he’s looked during a game in quite some time. Manning completed 21-of-28 passes for 234 yards with two touchdowns and no interceptions. He marched the Giants up-and-down the field, rolled out and found open receivers on play action passes.

While Manning went deep down the field just once on the incomplete pass to Randle, he seemed entirely comfortable throwing things underneath and letting his playmakers make plays. Two of the biggest plays Sunday (Victor Cruz’s 26-yard touchdown and 61-yard reception) were both passes of just eight yards that Cruz turned into more.

Once Manning got into his rhythm, he started making Manning throws again. His second touchdown of the game, a nine-yard pass to Daniel Fells, was a thing of beauty:

RUNNING BACKS by Connor Hughes

One of the more impressive things about Rashad Jennings is his vision, it really is incredible. There were countless plays on Sunday where Jennings started one way, then made a little juke/shimmy/cutback to find another lane on the other side of the field. These are the little things that can’t be measured or seen in any drill, it’s god given.

Maybe the best example of Jennings vision came on a first-down run in the second half. It looked as if the Giants wanted to run a stretch play to the right side of the field. A stretch is a play in which the entire offensive line blocks the defensive line right, and the running back runs that way. The play is designed to get the outside.

Jennings started going this way, and the defense started their pursuit there, too. Jennings saw this, then saw the left side of the field wide open. He reversed his angle and took it the other direction for a first. You just can’t coach that. Jennings played like a man possessed.

But the biggest play Jennings made Sunday wasn’t one that shows up on the stat sheets. In fact, if it wasn’t for his play, Cruz isn’t doing any salsa in any endzone. With the Texans showing blitz in the A gap, Manning took the snap and Jennings stepped up and picked up in the blitzing linebacker. The block gave Manning enough time to fire a pass to Cruz, who then made a defender miss and raced into the endzone.

WIDE RECEIVERS by Connor Hughes

Victor Cruz caught a lot of flack for his game last week, and for good reason. Cruz asked for the ball more in order for the offense to have success, then dropped three passes when they were thrown his way.

If Cruz had caught two of the three he missed versus Arizona, the Giants probably win the game. Because of one of his catches this week, the Giants did.

It was a classic, old school Victor Cruz performance filled with yards after the catch and ankle-breaking moves. On his touchdown, the move he made to free himself was just unreal.

Cruz seems to have found himself a home in the Giants offense and is beginning to get on the same page as Manning. He’s finding the holes in the defense again.

It’s tough to know exactly what to make of Rueben Randle. He’ll make plays like last week’s one-handed grab that leaves everyone awestruck, but then he’ll play like he did versus Houston which leaves much to be desired. Randle wasn’t bad, he was just blah. The former second-round pick caught five passes for 27 yards.

When McAdoo imagined the Giants offense, I doubt designing plays for Preston Parker was what he had in mind. Either way, Parker played well filling in for Jerrel Jernigan/Odell Beckham Jr. He dropped the one ball, but made a few other catches and ran a nice route on a comeback.

TIGHT ENDS by Connor Hughes

The biggest surprise for the Giants has been the emergence of Larry Donnell as the team’s tight end. Addressing this early, I labeled Donnell as a ‘Dud’ following the game after his fumble on the goal line. The ‘Dud’ label was really just a half dud, there really weren’t any full duds coming out of that game.

With that being said, I take it back entirely. The fumble was a perfect hit by the safety who put his helmet right on the ball. Donnell could have moved the ball to the other hand, but it was more just a textbook play by Kendrick Lewis.

Donnell as a receiver continues to impress, even though that’s what he’s known as doing. Sunday, there was one play that stood out more than most. The biggest thing Donnell can develop is chemistry with Manning. To be able to adjust to plays on the fly because he can anticipate what Manning is thinking. There was a glimpse of that beginning to happen.

With Donnell perfectly covered by Daniel Manning, Manning threw a pass just behind Donnell. The tight end had to stop his pattern and jump back to make the grab, but that’s what Manning wanted him to do. Had he led him, it’s an interception. Donnell saw this, too, and made the adjustment on the ball for a helluva catch.

Donnell also took huge strides Sunday blocking. Believe it or not, the Giants let him face off against JJ Watt. Believe it or not, Donnell held his own. If that aspect of his game comes around, the Giants may have something special on their hands.

OFFENSIVE LINE by Connor Hughes

Get this out of the way now: Sometimes, J.J. Watt does things that only J.J. Watt can do. Like…

Watt is one of the league’s best defensive players, he’s going to make plays no matter who is in front of him. With that being said, the Giants did a remarkable job against him. In particular, Justin Pugh. Pugh went up against Watt more than a few of the other Giants and did very, very well. Sure, he let up a few plays, but not nearly as much as so many others.

Aside from containing Watt, the Giants offensive line played their best game in potentially two years. There were massive holes for Jennings to run through and time for Manning to throw. The player that stood out the most was John Jerry.

When Jerry arrived in New York, he was known primarily as a pass blocker. Sunday, he made some incredible plays pulling in the run game.  During the first two weeks of the season, Brandon Mosley was listed on the game day depth chart as the starting right guard. In a pre-game announcement, a ‘substitution’ of Jerry for Mosley was announced. Sunday, Jerry was listed as the starting right guard and he deserves it.

Sometimes, you don’t need the best offensive linemen to make the best offensive line. What you need is five players playing together. The last two weeks, the Giants have had that.

DEFENSIVE OVERVIEW - by Eric Kennedy

Not playing for the Giants on defense were LB Jon Beason (foot/ankle) and LB Devon Kennard (hamstring).

The New York Giants defense played very well in the first half of the game, but slackened noticeably in the second half. It was a mostly positive performance as the Giants held the Texans to a 17 percent third-down conversion rate, made a key 4th down stop, picked off three passes, and limited the Texans to 17 points.

In the first half, the Giants held the Texans to four first downs, 0-of-7 on third down, and 83 net yards (41 rushing and 42 passing) as Houston was kept off of the scoreboard. However, the Texans gained 16 first downs, 328 net yards (78 rushing and 250 passing), and 17 point in the second half. The Giants also surrendered three plays of over 40 yards in the second half, two of which came on the TD drive where the Texans cut the score to 17-10 at the end of the third quarter. The game got uncomfortably close at this point.

Overall, it was a step in the right direction, but not a complete game.

Jason Pierre-Paul, New York Giants (September 21, 2014)

Jason Pierre-Paul – © USA TODAY Sports Images

DEFENSIVE LINE - by Eric Kennedy

It was a solid all-around game for the Giants up front. Houston running backs were held to 85 yards rushing on 17 carries. Had the Giants not surrendered a 46-yard run to rookie Alfred Blue in the third quarter, those numbers would have looked even better (39 yards on 16 carries). The only other time the Giants were a bit soft against the run was on Houston’s opening drive when Blue picked up 22 yards on three carries. It was on these few plays where the Texans were able to successfully block DE Jason Pierre-Paul (7 tackles, 1 tackle for a loss, 1 pass defense) and DT Johnathan Hankins (4 tackles, 0.5 sacks, 1 pass defense). The big play by Hankins was stuffing the 4th-and-1 play early in the third quarter (with an assist from DE Mathias Kiwanuka and DT Mike Patterson). Pierre-Paul was very disruptive against the run at times.

The Giants only had two sacks. Among the defensive linemen, only Hankins received partial credit for a sack. But those numbers do not tell the full story. The Giants got good pressure much of the day from all four starters at different points of the contest. Pierre-Paul made his presence felt as a pass rusher and Kiwanuka and DT Cullen Jenkins (4 tackles, 1 pass defense) flashed at times. JPP caused the first interception with his hit on the Houston QB as he was throwing the ball. In addition, I really the way JPP has been hustling all over the field. When he doesn’t get to the QB, he chases and pursues the ball carrier.

Robert Ayers caught my attention several times as a pass rusher from the defensive tackle position, and Damontre Moore had a couple of quality pass rushes. Ayers helped to cause the second interception. The Giants tipped three passes and would have had more sacks had they been able to wrap up QB Ryan Fitzpatrick on a number of occasions.

Jameel McClain, New York Giants (September 14, 2014)

Jameel McClain – © USA TODAY Sports Images

LINEBACKERS - by Eric Kennedy

Without Jon Beason playing, the fear was this unit would be a major liability in this game. It wasn’t. There was the one big 46-yard run where both Jameel McClain and Jacquian Williams were blocked (along with Hankins and Pierre-Paul), but for the most part the linebackers did their job agains the run. McClain finished the game with a team-high 11 tackles, plus 0.5 sacks and one tackle for a loss. He flashed on the blitz a couple of times. Williams (5 tackles) was far more physical against the run this week and flashed on a play where he stunted with JPP and helped to cause an incompletion on third down. But both McClain and Williams also missed sacks on the elusive Fitzpatrick. Mark Herzlich (4 tackles and 1 tackle for a loss) played on the weakside (strongside in Fewell’s defense).

Oddly, the Texans never really went after the linebackers in pass coverage until the third quarter when they experienced a moderate amount of success over the middle to TE Garrett Graham and crossing routes to the slot receiver.

DEFENSIVE BACKS - by Eric Kennedy

The defensive backs played pretty well for the most part, but they did give up some big plays. The best news was the turnovers. Three interceptions, two of which led to 10 points. CB Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie (3 tackles, 1 tackle for a loss, 1 interception, 2 pass defenses) was sharp. He got his first interception as a Giant and almost a second. DRC also stood out in run defense on one play, nailing the back for a 2-yard loss. He was often lined up against perenial Pro Bowler Andre Johnson, who was limited to 24 yards on four catches. Rodgers-Cromartie was flagged with a defensive holding penalty.

Prince Amukamara, New York Giants (September 14, 2014)New York Giants (September 14, 2014)

Prince Amukamara – © USA TODAY Sports Images

CB Prince Amukamara (5 tackles, 1 interception, 2 pass defenses) also had a interception and almost came down with two more. But he also was beat by WR DeAndre Hopkins a couple of times (a 17-yard comeback route and a 49 yard deep pass). He was also flagged for a bogus pass interference penalty that gave the Texans a 1st-and-goal from the 1-yard line.

SS Antrel Rolle gave the Giants a huge lift right before halftime with an interception and 25 yard return down to the Houston 2-yard line, setting up a score and a 14-0 halftime advantage. FS Stevie Brown and CB Trumaine McBride got burned on Hopkins’ 44-yard touchdown pass that cut the score to 17-10. This is the second time this season Brown has given up a long touchdown by not properly covering the deep half of the field. Other than that play, McBride wasn’t noticed so it appears he did a good job in replacing Walter Thurmond for at least one week.

SPECIAL TEAMS - by Eric Kennedy

There were two huge mistakes early that originally appeared would cost the Giants dearly. First, the Giants were unprepared for a fake punt that resulted in an easy 10-yard completion and a first down on Houston’s first offensive possession (thankfully, the defense saved the special teams here). Second, early in the second quarter, Zak DeOssie’s bad snap on a 30-yard field goal effort not only resulted in no points, but also gave Houston the ball at the 41-yard line.

Damontre Moore, New York Giants (September 14, 2014)

Damontre Moore blocks a punt – © USA TODAY Sports Images

On the positive side, Damontre Moore’s punt block in the 4th quarter set the Giants’ offensive up on the Houston 29-yard line, helping the Giants to extend their lead to 27-10.

PK Josh Brown was 3-for-3 on his field goal efforts (from 39, 29, and 31 yards out). Of his seven kickoffs, four went for touchbacks while three were returned for a total of 67 yards, the longest being a return of 31 yards.

Steve Weatherford punted four times with an average of 39.8 yards per punt. The only punt returned by Houston went for three yards.

Quintin Demps had one kickoff return for 17 yards. Preston Parker returned one punt for 12 yards and had another 12-yard called back due to a holding penalty on Damontre Moore. Larry Donnell recovered an onside kick.

(Boxscore – Houston Texans at New York Giants, September 21, 2014)
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September 23, 2014 New York Giants Injury Report: Other than the players on Injured Reserve, the only player to not practice on Tuesday was LB Devon Kennard (hamstring).

WR Odell Beckham (hamstring), LB Jon Beason (foot/ankle), CB Zack Bowman (quad), OT Charles Brown (shoulder), OT James Brewer (back), and P Steve Weatherford (ankle) practiced on a limited basis.

“(Beckham) practiced, did some individual,” said Head Coach Tom Coughlin. “It wasn’t the most extensive of individuals, but he did that. His load is to increase as he goes along now.”

“(Beason) practiced today,” said Coughlin. “We look at him every morning and see how he feels and so on and so forth. He did okay today and we’ll see what it’s like tomorrow.”

September 23, 2014 New York Giants Coach Media Sessions: Transcripts and video clips of Tuesday’s media sessions with the following coaches are available at Giants.com:

September 23, 2014 New York Giants Player Media Q&As: Transcripts and video of Tuesday’s media Q&A sessions with the following players are available at Giants.com:

7 takeaways from Giants Media Hour by Dan Salomone of Giants.com

Giants on WFAN: Audio clips from Monday’s WFAN interviews with the following players are available at CBS New York:

Article on TE Larry Donnell: Giants TE Larry Donnell ‘Blessed’ to work with Pope by George Willis of The New York Post

Article on S Quintin Demps: Demps takes over at safety in tough week by Dan Graziano of ESPN.com

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September 22, 2014 New York Giants Injury Report: Not practicing during Monday’s jog-thru practice were WR Odell Beckham (hamstring), LB Devon Kennard (hamstring), and CB Zack Bowman (quad).

“I think that there is improvement in Odell and there has been every week. I don’t believe he is there,” said Head Coach Tom Coughlin. “We are trying to be as patient as we can with the idea being that when we get him back, we are going to have him.”

LB Jon Beason (foot/ankle), OT Charles Brown (shoulder), OT James Brewer (back), and P Steve Weatherford (ankle) practiced on a limited basis.

“We are going to see to what extent Jon can be a part of our on the field work,” said Coughlin.

Giants Sign OG Eric Herman to the Practice Squad: The Giants have signed offensive guard Eric Herman to the Practice Squad. The team waived Herman from the 53-man roster last Friday. To make room for Herman, the Giants terminated the Practice Squad contract of offensive tackle Mark Asper.

September 22, 2014 Tom Coughlin Press Conference: The transcript of Head Coach Tom Coughlin’s Monday conference call is available at Giants.com.

September 22, 2014 New York Giants Player Media Q&As: Transcripts of media conference calls on Monday with the following players are available at BigBlueInteractive.com:

NY Post Q&A with TE Larry Donnell: Serby’s Sunday Q&A with Larry Donnell by Steve Serby of The New York Post

Article on Head Coach Tom Coughlin: Regardless of Defeats, Coughlin Won’t Lose His Passion by Harvey Araton of The New York Times

Article on RB Rashad Jennings: Rashad Jennings dedicated his 176-yard game to his double-amputee father by Steve Politi of The Star-Ledger

Article on the New York Giants Offensive Line: J.J. Watt vs. Giants: Who handled the league’s best defensive player? by Conor Orr of The Star-Ledger

Article on the Giants-Texans Game: Giants snap counts vs. Texans and what they mean by Jordan Raanan of The Star-Ledger

Sights and Sounds from Giants-Texans Game: A sights and sounds video from the Giants-Texans game is available at Giants.com.

 

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