Oct 312015
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The New York Giants have signed linebacker James Morris to the 53-man roster from the team’s Practice Squad. To make room for Morris, the Giants waived cornerback Brandon McGee.

The Giants signed Morris to the Practice Squad on September 16. Morris was originally signed as an undrafted rookie free agent by the New England Patriots after the 2014 NFL Draft. The Patriots placed him on Injured Reserve in August 2014 after tearing an ACL in the final preseason game against the Giants.

The Giants signed McGee to the Practice Squad on October 15 and to the 53-man roster on October 18. McGee was originally drafted in the 5th round of the 2013 NFL Draft by the St. Louis Rams.

The Giants are short at linebacker this week with J.T. Thomas (ankle) out and Jon Beason (ankle/knee) questionable for the game against the Saints. Beason did make the trip to New Orleans.


Oct 302015
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WR Victor Cruz (calf), DE Owamagbe Odighizuwa (hamstring), LB J.T. Thomas (ankle), and CB Prince Amukamara (pectoral) have been ruled out of Sunday’s game against the New Orleans Saints. OT Will Beatty (pectoral – PUP) and DE Jason Pierre-Paul (hand – roster exemption) also will not play.

LB Jon Beason (ankle/knee) is “questionable” for the game.

WR Odell Beckham (hamstring), RG Geoff Schwartz (ankle), and LB Uani ‘Unga (neck) are “probable” for the game.

Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with Tom Coughlin are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

New York Giants defensive end addressed the media for the first time on Friday since maiming himself in a July 4th fireworks accident. The transcript of his media session is available in The Corner Forum while the video is available at Giants.com.

For those with stronger stomachs who want to see what’s left of Pierre-Paul’s right hand, see JPP reveals mangled right hand as he relives fireworks mishap by Howie Kussoy of The New York Post.


The Giants will have a 45-minute, up-tempo “walk-thru” practice on Saturday that is not open to the media. The Giants play the Saints in New Orleans on Sunday.

Oct 292015
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WR Victor Cruz (calf), DE Owamagbe Odighizuwa (hamstring), LB Jon Beason (ankle/knee), LB J.T. Thomas (ankle), and CB Prince Amukamara (pectoral) did not practice on Thursday.

OT Will Beatty (pectoral – PUP) and DE Jason Pierre-Paul (hand – roster exemption) continue to work on an undisclosed limited basis.

“(Pierre-Paul) moved around well,” said Head Coach Tom Coughlin about Pierre-Paul’s practice on Wednesday. “He moved well and I think he proved to the medical people that he’s in good shape. That’s not to include all the back and forth, sideways stuff. He’s going to have to work his way through some of that, too. But he’s in excellent condition…He’s going to get a couple of reps in scout squad today.”

“Today was really the first day he kind of did anything,” said Defensive Coordinator Steve Spagnuolo after Thursday’s practice. “I know he ran around yesterday, so I haven’t really had a chance to watch the film. It’s going to take a little while, it’s really early now. We want to be optimistic, and I know he is, too, but I think we want to be smart about it. We’ll just see where it goes.”

“(Beatty has) been out here working the last couple days and doing a nice job and doing everything he can to put himself in position to come back as soon as he can,” said Offensive Coordinator Ben McAdoo. “We look forward to having him back when he’s ready…He’s doing a nice job out here. He’s working, getting his feet wet, getting his shoulders going. We’ll be ready for him when he’s ready to come back. Excited to get him back.”

RG Geoff Schwartz (ankle) practiced on a limited basis. WR Odell Beckham (hamstring) and LB Uani ‘Unga (neck) fully practiced.

“I’ll say this, today (Beckham) was sticking his foot in the ground, he was coming out of his breaks with some speed and energy and made some nice plays,” said McAdoo.

According to ESPN.com, the 1-year contract signed by defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul has a maximum value of $8.71 million and includes:

  • $1.5 million guaranteed salary.
  • $1.5 million maximum in per game active roster bonuses (approximately $214,285 for each game he is on the 46-man roster on game day, up to seven games).
  • $3.85 million in playing-time incentives ($100,000 per week if he plays 45 percent of the snaps, $300,000 for 75 percent of the snaps, and $550,000 for 80 percent of the snaps – again up to seven games).
  • $1.864 million in sack-performance incentives (must accrue 7.5 sacks to receive full amount; if he records 10 sacks, he gets the full $3.85 million playing-time bonus regardless of playing time).

So all Pierre-Paul needs to do to receive $3 million is be active for seven games this season, regardless of how well or poorly he plays. ESPN.com reports that to get his full $8.71 million (basically the 9-game prorated amount of his original $14.813 million tender), Pierre Paul needs to be on the active roster for seven games AND either (a) play 80 percent of the defensive snaps while recording at least 7.5 sacks or (b) record 10 sacks.

As part of the deal, the Giants agreed not to put Pierre-Paul on the Non-Football Injury (NFI) List. Thus, Pierre-Paul is now eligible to become an unrestricted free agent in 2016 unless the Giants Franchise him again or sign him to another deal after the season and before free agency begins.

Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following coaches are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:


Instead of practicing, the Giants will hold a “recovery day” on Friday. The players will select two of six recovery stations, based on seniority. Their choices are massage, yoga, FMS (Functional Movement Screen) exercises designed for the individual, air compression boots, contrast bath (between a hot and cold tub), and self-massage with stick rollers and elastic bands.

The Giants will also have a 45-minute, up-tempo “walk-thru” practice on Saturday that is not open to the media. The Giants play the Saints in New Orleans on Sunday.

Oct 282015
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Jason Pierre-Paul, New York Giants (November 3, 2014)

Jason Pierre-Paul– © USA TODAY Sports Images

As was to be expected, Head Coach Tom Coughlin was repeatedly asked about the return of defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul to the team during his press conference on Wednesday.

“(Pierre-Paul) will start with the medical team,” said Coughlin. “He can do all the jog-thru’s, he can be out there for whatever we’re doing pre-practice, then he’s going to slide off to the side with the medical people, be under their supervision. How long that lasts is really according to how well they feel he’s able to proceed. He’s told me that he’s worked against bags, he’s delivered blows on a board and done all of those things. When he came in, he looked good. I asked him what he weighed, he said 268, and he was right on the money. So he’s worked, he’s been working. We’ll just see how fast this comes along.

“(His teammates) looked forward to seeing Jason. He’s excited about being here and he’s anxious to get started. I think that’s a good thing and the rest of the guys picked up on that right away…We’re all rooting for him, to be honest with you. He had a very traumatic experience and he’s done really what appears to be an outstanding job of preparing himself. He is mentally very upbeat, his attitude is outstanding. He’s anxious to go and play right now, to be honest with you. But they’re going to go relatively slow on that. Yeah, it will be a wonderful thing to have him come back, get ready to play, and play and contribute, which is his plan.”

Coughlin was asked how the injuries might now affect his game. “I’m hoping he’s as good as (he was),” replied Coughlin. “If you’ve studied him and you watched how he maneuvers when he does rush the passer, then he’ll use that hand basically as he always has, not necessarily as a grabber, but as a club.”

Pierre-Paul now weighs 268 pounds, down 10 pounds from his previous playing weight. “It’s a good weight,” said Coughlin.

Coughlin was also asked about how much Pierre-Paul will have to catch up with Steve Spagnuolo’s defensive system. “He’s got quite a bit to catch up on,” said Coughlin. “The terminology, sure. But he’s already started on that.”

“There’s no intention right now of him playing Sunday,” said a smiling Coughlin. “He would like to play.”

Pierre-Paul was heartily welcomed back by his teammates at a team meeting on Wednesday morning.

“It was like a standing (ovation),” said cornerback Prince Amukamara. “Everyone just cheered and was excited he’s back.”

“It’s a good day to be a Giant,” said defensive end Robert Ayers when asked about Pierre-Paul. “I think he is going to shock a lot of people…He’s a guy who’s very humbled, hungry, and motivated.”

“We know what we are up front, we know what we’ve been, we know what our strengths and weaknesses have been and he can definitely come and help out and help us improve with some of our weaknesses as a D-line,” said defensive tackle Cullen Jenkins. “He’s still fast as ever, quick as ever…He looked really good out there.”

“It’s no secret that we haven’t rushed the passer as well as we’d like to and I feel like that’s something that he definitely brings to the table, will definitely instantly help us with,” said Jenkins.

“He’s very serious, a lot more quiet, focused on what he has to do because he still has a journey ahead of him,” said Jenkins. “Just because he’s back here, his road getting back hasn’t stopped. He’s still focused on getting through that road.”

NFL.com analyst Pat Kirwan has his doubts about Pierre-Paul’s future as a football player (audio from SiriusXM NFL Radio interview).

WR Victor Cruz (calf), RG Geoff Schwartz (ankle), DE Owamagbe Odighizuwa (hamstring), LB Jon Beason (ankle), LB J.T. Thomas (ankle), and CB Prince Amukamara (pectoral) did not practice on Wednesday.

Head Coach Tom Coughlin already ruled out Cruz and Amukamara for this weekend’s game against the New Orleans Saints. Coughlin said Schwartz should return to practice on Thursday. Thomas was wearing a protective walking boot in the locker room, which is not a good sign for his availability on Sunday.

Because he is still on the Reserve/Physically-Unable-to-Perform (PUP) List, the Giants are not required to provide a formal update on OT Will Beatty (pectoral). Beatty returned to practice on a very limited basis last week. The Giants can only keep him on the PUP for two more weeks.

“Beatty is going to get a little bit more, little bit more, little bit more, scout team work,” said Coughlin. “I wouldn’t say (there is a possibility he might play this weekend). He’s got to start (fully practicing), he hasn’t even had shoulder pads on yet.”

LB Uani ‘Unga (neck) was limited and WR Odell Beckham (hamstring) fully practiced. “I think we’re back to the normal routine,” said Beckham who has missed most practices the past two weeks. “I don’t really quite know yet, but I definitely do feel better.”

New York Giants wide receiver/returner Dwayne Harris has been named the “NFC Special Teams Players of the Week” for his performance against his former team, the Dallas Cowboys, last Sunday. In that game, Harris scored the game-winning touchdown on a 100-yard kickoff return with seven minutes remaining in the fourth quarter of the contest. Harris is the first Giants player to win the special teams award since place kicker Josh Brown in Week 15 of the 2013 season. Harris previously won the award three times with the Dallas Cowboys against the Giants, Eagles, and Redskins, giving him an NFC East sweep.

The transcript of Tom Coughlin’s press conference on Wednesday is available in The Corner Forum while the video is available at Giants.com.

The following transcripts and video of player media sessions on Wednesday are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

The audio of Wednesday’s ESPN Radio interview with wide receiver Rueben Randle is available at ESPN.com.


The Giants practice on Thursday and hold physical recovery cycles on Friday in advance of Sunday’s away game against the New Orleans Saints.

What a humbling experience this has been for me! I'd like to take the time out to thank God FIRST for giving me a second opportunity to play football. I'd also like to thank the Giants organization for believing in me to play for them again and to be alongside my brothers during the 2015 Season. Also, want to thank my Fiancé, Son, Family , Friends, Eugene Parker, Danny Martoe, Realitivity sports, Dr. Owens, Dr. Askari, Dr. Potparic, Debbie (hand therapist), Mike Alessi, Impact sports facility and staff, Coach John Blake, Pastor O'brien,Fans and everyone who was keeping me in their prayers and believed in me! God is good all the time! Have faith , patience and prayer with you always! Let's go Big Blue! #90PowerCircle #ImBack

A photo posted by Jason Pierre-Paul (@iamjasonpierrepaul) on

Oct 272015
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Jason Pierre-Paul, New York Giants (September 29, 2013)

Jason Pierre-Paul – © USA TODAY Sports Images

The New York Giants have officially announced that they have agreed to a 1-year contract with defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul that will keep Pierre-Paul with the team through the remainder of the 2015 NFL season. The Giants have been granted a two-game roster exemption for Pierre-Paul. During that time, he is expected to return to the practice field and begin football drills.

As has been widely publicized, Pierre-Paul suffered catastrophic injuries to his right hand in a July 4th fireworks accident, including the amputation of his index finger, the reported loss of portions of his middle finger and thumb, fractures to the thumb, and multiple skin grafts.

Pierre-Paul was designated the team’s Franchise Player in early May with a 1-year, $14.813 million tender that he never signed. That tender was reduced by approximately $6.1 million because he missed the first seven games of the season. For the last two days, it has been reported and speculated that the Giants and Pierre-Paul were working on an incentive-laden deal to replace the $8.7 million remainder of the original tender. Multiple sources are reporting that the new contract is largely based on incentives tied to performance and playing time. The hope is that he will be able to play by Week 10 or Week 12 (the Giants have a bye in Week 11).

Pierre-Paul kept his distance from the team since the accident except for a meeting with the Giants on September 7th and a second meeting with team officials that began on Monday. Team medical personnel have examined Pierre-Paul’s permanently-damaged right hand and believe he can now return to the playing field. They did not after the first meeting in September.

“We all are excited to see Jason,” said General Manager Jerry Reese. “He has worked very hard to get himself back into position to join the team and work toward getting on the playing field on Sundays.”

“I’m very excited to be back,” said Pierre-Paul. “I’m getting ready to do what I have to do. I’ve been training down in South Florida with my trainer. Every day, I got up at 7:30 and lifted weights, I’ve been doing what I have to do to stay in football shape.”

“I feel younger,” replied Pierre-Paul when asked how he felt. “I’m just here to help the team out. I’m blessed to play the game, and I’m excited about the opportunity to play again.”

Pierre-Paul has never played for Defensive Coordinator Steve Spagnuolo, so his complicated defensive schemes and terminology will be new to him. Pierre-Paul also has not practiced since December 2014. There is not much time as the Giants are almost halfway through the 2015 regular season with just nine games left to play.

“It is just good to have Jason back in our building,” said Head Coach Tom Coughlin. “You can feel his energy and his desire to overcome what he has had to endure since July. His spirit is undeniable, and he is anxious to get to work with (Defensive Line Coach) Robert Nunn and Spags, as well as our medical and strength and conditioning people.”

Oct 272015
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Jason Pierre-Paul, New York Giants (December 28, 2014)

Jason Pierre-Paul – © USA TODAY Sports Images

According to press reports, defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul and the New York Giants are in negotiations on a 1-year contract that would reduce his pro-rated, 1-year, $8.7 million Franchise tender (minus $6.1 million for the seven games he has missed) to an incentive-laden deal. The contract would likely prevent the Giants from placing Pierre-Paul on the Non-Football Injury (NFI) List, ensuring that Pierre-Paul would be paid. ESPN is reporting that Pierre-Paul could return to the playing field by Week 10 or Week 12 (the Giants have a bye during Week 11). FOX Sports is reporting that Pierre-Paul could be back on the field by Week 10.

Press reports say that Head Coach Tom Coughlin, General Manager Jerry Reese, and Defensive Line Coach Robert Nunn met with Pierre-Paul on Monday. In addition, Pierre-Paul was examined by team medical personnel who have apparently have determined that Pierre-Paul is physically capable of playing football again this season.

Newsday and NJ.com have reported that Pierre-Paul’s injuries to his right hand from the July 4th fireworks accident include an amputated index finger, the loss of portions of his middle finger and thumb, and fractures to his thumb. Pierre-Paul also had extensive burns that required multiple skin grafts. Other concerns include Pierre-Paul not being able to adequately weight train due to the injuries and corresponding loss of strength and mass, his not practicing since December 2014, and his unfamiliarity with new Defensive Coordinator Steve Spagnuolo’s system.

“There is no timetable set for me just yet,” WR Victor Cruz told reporters on Monday. “I meet with the doctors again this Thursday and take it from there. I feel better and I know that I’m progressing because the previous MRI showed the area of discomfort has gotten a lot smaller. Hopefully that trend continues and I’ll be out there sooner or later.”

Cruz has not completed a full practice since August 17 due to his injured calf. Cruz experienced a setback when attempting to practice on September 30.

As is usually the case, the Giants worked out a number of street free agents on Tuesday. Those reportedly working out for the team included place kickers Kyle Brindza, Zach Hocker, Corey Acosta, and Tom Obarski.

The audio of Monday’s WFAN Radio interview with quarterback Eli Manning is available on CBS New York’s website.

A sights and sounds video from the Giants’ 27-20 victory over the Dallas Cowboys is now available at Giants.com.


The players return to practice on Wednesday to start preparing for Sunday’s game against the New Orleans Saints.

Oct 262015
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According to multiple press reports, defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul is meeting with the New York Giants today. Pierre-Paul will supposedly allow team doctors to examine his severely-damaged right hand for second time since his July 4th fireworks accident. The original meeting with the team was on September 7th. Pierre-Paul believes he can play now but it remains to be seen if the Giants agrees. ESPN is reporting that the Giants discussed reducing Pierre-Paul’s current Franchise tender (approximately $871,000 per week) in September, but Pierre-Paul refused.

Tom Coughlin addressed the media by conference call on Monday:

Good afternoon. Just a couple thoughts about yesterday afternoon’s game. The significance of the plus-four turnovers and the fact that we had no turnovers on offense or special teams was obviously huge in the game. We only had three penalties in the game, all three on defense, all three on the same drive. We had a defensive touchdown, a special teams touchdown. And we had a spark, which I thought was very, very instrumental in our ability to win the game. The spark being, one, DRC and his two interceptions which we talked about, it could have been three. And he had the sideline with the first one, too, if he had been able to hang on to the ball. But his defensive touchdown there was a real spark. Dwayne Harris, his kickoff return was a real spark. He also had a nice tackle on special teams as well. He had a 38-yard pass play which put us in outstanding field position right as we got close to the end of the first half. I thought that our offensive line play and rushing for 132, which was the first time we’d been over that mark this year, but I thought we had some good, physical runs. And I thought Orleans Darkwa gave us a spark. There were a lot of things in the game, as I told the players this morning. We’re real happy today because we won the game. We knew, in the division, the kind of game it was going to be.

We had speculated 35 plus runs in the game, and actually Dallas had 41 runs and they were very good at it. They got after us pretty good in the run game. We knew the physicality of the game, the talent of the defensive team of Dallas, the talent of the kicker and the punter, in particular, and the talent of their offensive line. It had to be the best rushing game that McFadden’s had in quite some while, but you can see the acceleration and the speed—how that fits what they’re trying to do with their offensive team as they go forward. There were many things that we need to do a much better job of. Again, I thought there was a critical drive where we had the ball after coming off our minus-one yard line. We had the ball in a position where scoring a touchdown there would have been key. We were not able to do that. That little bit about the green-zone does continue to bother me. Even though we were running the ball pretty well in that sequence, we didn’t score.

We won the game, we’re excited about winning the game. There’s a lot of things we can do better. We congratulated our team and then, as we always do, we talked about the areas that must be improved, because improvement is the key. We talk about that every week as we get ready to play—we want to play better than we played the week before, each week. It kind of goes back and forth but in this game I thought the major contributions of all three phases and how they complemented each other was radically different from the experience we had down in Philadelphia. So we’re happy to win, we have a lot of work to do.

Q: The last three games or so, the run defense has given up, I think, over 100 yards to the opponents. What have you seen to be the difference these last three games versus earlier when you were holding opponents to under 100 yards?

A: We made some mistakes in terms of our responsibilities and how we play certain aspects of the run. There were some things that Dallas did coming off of a bye week, which you knew was going to happen. They introduced a couple of different thoughts in there. By in large, they blocked us and we’ve got to find a way—and they’re a good offensive team, don’t get me wrong—but we’ve got to do a better job of holding the point, of being where we’re supposed to be from a gap responsibility, of recognizing the style run that’s coming. We lost leverage on the corner consistently. One of the reasons was that as much as you want to tell somebody how fast an individual is, McFadden did just run around us a few times. When he hit a couple of plays off-tackle, we were holding our breath there to try to get him down, particularly when he got started through the line of scrimmage. It’s a number of things—they blocked very well, we were sometimes out of position, and sometimes not maintaining our leverage and our contain responsibilities. Our tackling at times was shoddy. We didn’t get away with block tackles, which you don’t like to see anyway, but some of the people in the secondary were trying to implement that and it wasn’t successful. There’s a bunch of reasons why.

Q: This wasn’t Eli’s most prolific passing game, but he avoided the costly mistake. Can you talk a little about the offensive line’s ability to protect him and keep Dallas out of the backfield?

A: We knew the type of rush we were going to get. We knew how important it was to get the ball off. You adjust your style of play when that’s the case and we did that. The offensive line did a good job of that. There were occasions where I thought that Eli really demonstrated a learning experience when he was under pressure and really had no place to go with the ball and thought more about taking care of the ball than trying to find a way to get us back to the line of scrimmage. Both times he secured the ball to his body and went down. Nobody likes to see that, but it’s much better than a turnover or a penalty. I thought that he did an outstanding job of that. He made an outstanding throw down the sideline to hit Rueben Randle. He made a couple of key throws at key times. Really I thought there was probably one opportunity in the green zone that we did not take advantage of, for whatever reason. He managed the game very well, he made a number of adjustment calls at the line of scrimmage—had a lot to do with more run game than perhaps at any other time this year. From the standpoint of the guy who was in charge of the game and directed the game etc. etc., he did an outstanding job.

Q: Do you think going forward you’ll need more production, more explosion out of that passing game to sustain success?

A: Oh, I think so. I don’t think there’s any doubt about that. The issue that we’re having is obvious. We’ve got some guys that are not able to practice full-time and it’s difficult when there’s not practice time to go ahead and just go out on the field Sunday afternoon and play as if you’ve had all those days and those opportunities that you normally get throughout the course of the week where you communicate well. Particularly if you’re introducing something a little bit different, you don’t have that. That’s a little bit of an issue right now and hopefully we can overcome it.

Q: Going back to the running backs for a moment. Obviously you knew what Orleans Darkwa could do, but having seen it now, you have four running backs who can really give you production in the running game. So how do you approach the responsibilities moving forward or how do you use these guys? Do you stick with that committee?

A: Well, committee is a word that—we’re fortunate to have four guys that can play. And of those four guys that can and do play, they also have special teams commitments, which is a huge plus for our team as well. We have a number of guys who have game experience, who some of which have different roles and they’ll continue in those roles, and they will continue to help us on special teams.

Q: Do you think it’s realistic though to use all four guys running the ball every week or is that something you’re going to have to pare down at some point?

A: I think right now it depends on the plan and the type of game we expect and how we strategize and plan on using. But the four healthy guys…that’s a great thing, believe me. When you look around at the different positions, four guys that continue to maintain good health, that helps an awful lot.

Q: What did you see from Darkwa during the week that gave you confidence to put him in there?

A: He had an outstanding preseason. So during the course of the week, he had some carries in first and second down. The coaches felt strongly that he should be given an opportunity. It wasn’t right away in the game, but eventually he played and he played well.

Q: What would you say to the idea that yesterday was not an impressive win or that perhaps you were lucky to win that game?

A: The luck part…there’s a lot of hard work that went into winning that game. It had nothing to do with luck, it had to do with us being in the right spot at the right time. Again, I attribute that to the turnovers and to the lack of penalties and us not turning it over—that’s not luck, there’s a lot of hard work involved in that. So we won the football game, we won it in a forthright manner. I’m not overly concerned with any of those other comments.

Q: As part of an answer yesterday, you mentioned, “Especially when no one thinks you can do it” type of attitude. Does that fuel your group?

A: Occasionally, it does. It’s a known fact that starting out 0-2 and then not playing as well as we had hoped in Philadelphia created more of that. If that is the case, then that’s a position we’ll take. You have to prove the doubters wrong.

Q: Seven games into the season, you’re almost to the midway point, what do you feel like you can hang your hat on with the team? What area of this team—

A: We play hard. We play hard. We play hard, it’s not always pretty. I think that with the kickoff return, the way in which our punt team has operated—it’s unfortunate that we had two touchbacks yesterday, we need to take just a little bit off of that. Balls hit at the one and I think around the three, you need to back that off a little bit to get that ball down inside the 10. But I think we can count on that going forward as well. But we have a bunch of guys who love the game, like what they’re doing, and play hard. That’s a  pretty good starting point. Effort is a great starting point for anything. By in large, I think we’re getting very good effort.

Q: By not listing like one of the facets of the offense or defense, are you still learning about what these units are though?

A: No, no. No.

Q: The kickoff return by Dwayne Harris obviously was a big play in that fourth quarter, a momentum changer. How good did you feel for him having such a big moment against his former team?

A: I didn’t consider that part, I considered it a good moment for our team. When he came screaming out of there, we had an entire sideline of people who were not only inspired by it, but they were extremely happy and not worried about showing our joy. We were excited about that.

Q: Tom, are you expecting to meet with Jason Pierre-Paul in the next day or so?

A: Am I?

Q: Do you or the doctors…is he due in to meet you guys?

A: Again, I told you that I would respond as soon as I knew in fact that it had taken place or that Jason was here. To my knowledge, he’s not here at this point in time. When he does, we’ll let you know. And it’s all going to start with the medical.

Q: Do you expect Damontre Moore to be back this week? And if there was any message intended on your part, do you think it was received?

A: Well, again, that stays between the player and I. Damontre Moore is a skilled athlete who we’ll again look at the plan and see exactly where we stand. If we can include him, then we will.

Transcripts of Monday’s media conference calls with the following players:


The players are off Tuesday and return to practice on Wednesday to start preparing for Sunday’s game against the New Orleans Saints.

Oct 222015
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WR Odell Beckham (hamstring), WR Victor Cruz (calf), LB Jon Beason (knee), LB Uani ‘Unga (neck), and CB Prince Amukamara (pectoral) did not practice on Thursday.

Head Coach Tom Coughlin indicated that Beckham is likely not to practice on Wednesdays and Thursdays but continue to attempt to play on game day. “This is where we are right now,” said Coughlin. “It may be that way for a while, I hope not. Obviously, you practice, you get better…He plays the whole game and then they deal with whatever he comes out of the game with and get him ready for the next one.”

“We’re going to be all right,” said Beckham. “The game plan is for Sunday. It’s about knowing what you need to do to get ready for Sunday.”

Cruz had an MRI on his injured calf but is still not cleared to practice. “He’s not cleared to go.,” said Coughlin. “He’s with the trainers…He gets an MRI every week…We all were (hoping he would be cleared). He still has a little bit of an injury there.”

Both middle linebackers missed practice, including Beason who was a new addition to the injury report with a knee issue. Amukamara has already been ruled out of Sunday’s game against the Dallas Cowboys.

WR Rueben Randle (hamstring), DE Robert Ayers (hamstring), LB Devon Kennard (hamstring), LB Jonathan Casillas (neck), CB Trumaine McBride (groin), and CB Trevin Wade (concussion) practiced on a limited basis.

OT Will Beatty (pectoral) returned to practice on a limited basis on Tuesday, but remains on the Reserve/Physically-Unable-to-Perform (PUP) List. Since he has now returned to the practice field, the Giants can keep him on that list for only three more weeks.

Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following coaches are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:


Instead of practicing, the Giants will hold a “recovery day” on Friday. The players will select two of six recovery stations, based on seniority. Their choices are massage, yoga, FMS (Functional Movement Screen) exercises designed for the individual, air compression boots, contrast bath (between a hot and cold tub), and self-massage with stick rollers and elastic bands.

The Giants will also have a 45-minute, up-tempo “walk-thru” practice on Saturday that is not open to the media. The Giants play the Dallas Cowboys at home on Sunday.

Oct 202015
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Cooper Taylor (30), New York Giants (November 10, 2013)

Cooper Taylor returning a blocked punt for a TD – © USA TODAY Sports Images

The New York Giants have waived safety Cooper Taylor. No other roster move was made immediately to fill Cooper’s roster spot.

Taylor was selected in the 5th round of the 2013 NFL Draft by the Giants. Taylor missed six games in 2013 with shoulder and hamstring injuries. He played in 10 games that year, serving almost exclusively on special teams. Taylor missed the entire 2014 season with a semasoid bone issue in his foot that required surgery. He was active for three games this years.

According to The Bergen Record, there has been recent improvement in wide receiver Victor Cruz’s calf injury. Cruz supposedly is no longer experiencing pain in his left calf and is scheduled to undergo an MRI on Wednesday to reassess his status. The Record says that if all goes well, Cruz could receive clearance to begin running again and then practice, perhaps as early as this week. It is unlikely that he would be able to play this weekend against the Cowboys.

Cruz has not fully practiced since August 17 due to the calf issue. He attempted to practice on September 30 but suffered a setback and received a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection on October 1 to help quicken the healing process.

Offensive tackle Will Beatty, who has not been able to practice since teaning his pectoral muscle in a May weight lifting accident, is eligible to return to practice this week if he is healthy enough to do so. Beatty is current on the Reserve/Physically-Unable-to-Perform (PUP) List.

Head Coach Tom Coughlin said on Tuesday that when the determination is made that Beatty will practice, the team will take it slowly. “We’ll first start with individual (drills),” said Coughlin. “When exactly that happens, I’m not sure if that’s going to start this week or when. But when we do, it will be with the idea of bringing him back slowly…He hasn’t done (football work) for a long, long time. And he’s got to get used to his pads. He’s got a lot of work ahead of him.”

Once Beatty begins practicing, the Giants will have a three-week window before they must move him to the 53-man roster.

Tight end Daniel Fells, who has been hospitalized for almost three weeks with a life-threatening MRSA infection (staph), was released from the hospital today. Fells has undergone seven surgeries with at least two more scheduled. Fells did have an infected bone removed from his foot, but the foot did not have to be amputated as was once feared. ESPN reports that additional surgeries in the future will be required to further clean out the infected area and likely will include plastic surgery. It is believed Fells career is over due to permanent damage to the foot.

According to ESPN, the Giants will meet with unsigned Franchise Player defensive Jason Pierre-Paul on Wednesday. This will be the second time the Giants have met with Pierre-Paul since he permanently-disfigured his right hand in a July 4th fireworks accident. The first meeting occurred in early September when the Giants determined that Pierre-Paul was physically not ready to return to the playing field.

Tom Coughlin addressed the media by conference call on Monday:

Good afternoon. I’ll just start out by summarizing the frustration of, I think, the first quarter, and that pretty much sums up the way I feel about the whole day. We take the first drive and go 80 yards in eight plays and score. They go three and out, we get the ball back, we take it the length of the field, we get down in there. They call it an interception, it’s really nothing but a strip of the ball that we’ve got two hands on, they’ve got one hand on—they strip the ball out, rip it away. Then they start their drive from the minus-22, they get a third and 10. We get a roughing the passer, which is no question a good call on the officials’ part, which gives them the continuation of a drive that they still have to go 60 yards, but they do. At the conclusion of the drive, they have a 32-yard pass for a touchdown which we’ve got a player in a half-field coverage right there for the ball and just doesn’t play the ball. The safety from the other side of the field comes over and almost gets a hand on it, but the person who’s back in that deep-half does not defend the ball in the air. It probably should have been intercepted, to be honest with you.

Then you go on and you get the running into the punter call and they still have to go 72 yards after that. But in those situations it is the idea that you’ve stopped them and you’re out. And it’s a good stop and it’s something that you work hard, it’s not an easy thing to do. And yet, then they take the ball and they go and score. The frustration on the part of our inability to take, if you can believe, four turnovers and have nothing to show for it—no points. To have some opportunities as we got the ball into position, only to go backwards with the foolishness of the penalties, the bizarre nature of the penalties—12 penalties for one team and eight for the other. And we’re the team with 12. We constantly, constantly harp on knowing full well that the team that we were going against led the league in forced fumbles, and yet to have that happen a couple on different times in the game in obvious circumstances. Then you add to it the second and one, third and one, and fourth and one, which had we been able to put the ball out there on the second and one just a little bit further, the ball was a little bit underthrown, I think that ball would have been caught. And then to have a third and one and fourth and one and not make the necessary yardage when you know that north-south is the answer to it. Let’s get ourselves in position where it couldn’t have been more than three or four inches that was the difference. And I thought we had an opportunity with regard to both times to get it, to pick it, but it didn’t happen. I’ll always take the responsibility for that and for everything else that happens on the field.

The frustration of the day continues with some of the penalties that were recorded for intentional grounding which, quite frankly, I thought we were through that. We’ve opened that can of worms again. We’ve got to do a better job with that. Protection, we had protection breakdowns as the game went along. We did have some good runs. I thought at the beginning of the game and sporadically throughout, we did have some opportunities with runs that gave us the chance, I thought, to have a good mix and have good balance. And we did have early on, and it did hold the rush in check. Then as the game got on, the rush did an outstanding job against us. Many times it was a four-man rush, too. Our ability to rush their passer to force them to throw the ball when they didn’t want to wasn’t quite as good as we had hoped it would be. We went over there, I thought we had a good week, we were really into this game and look forward to playing it. We knew what to expect from the big crowd, loud crowd, in the division—all of that. It did not turn out the way we wanted it to. I’m sure that knowing in our locker room the number of people that take great pride in what they do and the way we felt about it afterwards, we’re going to have to come bouncing back. It’ll have to happen really fast as it is a short week. Hopefully we have a limited number of things to deal with in terms of the injuries, but I’m not quite clear on any of that today, it’s a little bit early.

Q: Do you have an update on where things stand with Will Beatty? He’s eligible to come off the PUP list.

A: Yeah, when that is decided it will be slow going. We’ll first start with individual. When exactly that happens, I’m not sure if that’s going to start this week or when. But when we do, it will be with the idea of bringing him back slowly.

Q: What are the challenges? What needs to be done to get him up to speed?

A: Well naturally, you have to put him on the field. You have to put him in football work. You’ve got to do all those kinds of things. He hasn’t done that for a long, long time. And he’s got to get used to his pads. He’s got a lot of work ahead of him.

Q: Can you trust Damontre Moore to be on the field and not make the kinds of penalties that he made last night?

A: I can’t honestly really say that. He’s obviously of a high-energy, he does give outstanding effort, there’s no question about it. But with regard to that, there’s absolutely no excuse for anyone for the unnecessary roughness penalty that he committed last night. Not knowing and being aware of the fact with what the down and distance was, and I realize he may not have known what’s going on behind him, but clearly, clearly to understand the way in which the quarterback is protected and rightfully so, and what can and can’t be done from a standpoint of his position. There’s no excuse for that. You used the word trust, I don’t know. That’s a good word.

Q: Did you have to sit down and talk to him? Is that something that you plan on doing or have done?

A: There’s been a lot sitting down and talking. I certainly will do more of it and he is very good about listening etc. But we’ve got to see whether it can hold true on the field.

Q: Given all the penalties and mistakes, did you feel heading into this game that the team had maybe started to turn the corner and you were just surprised maybe a little bit by the setback?

A: Oh, for sure, I was. We had played our way into three wins, we had gotten ourselves into a position we wanted to be in. We had created a big opportunity for our team, Philadelphia had done the same thing with their start and then where they had come. I was confident that our team was going to play hard and to be play in the same style and fashion that we had been. The number of things that occurred in the game just weren’t anything that we had been doing. We hadn’t done that, we hadn’t just carelessly given the ball away. We hadn’t really had an outbreak of the kind of penalties that took place. We played hard, as I mentioned last night. We didn’t play balanced, we didn’t help each other at all. We didn’t do the things necessary in order to complement each other on offense, defense and special teams. We put ourselves in a bad position, didn’t accomplish what we needed to, didn’t take advantage of the opportunities that were there for us—all those things which I really felt we were on our way, we were growing into the type of team that can handle those things and those situations in very important games. It was a disappointment to me, no doubt.

Q: When you had a chance to look at the offensive line and the pass rush that they got, did you see one-on-one guys just getting beat or was it mental breakdowns?

A: When there was pressure or whatever, there were occasions where people were beat and some occasions where the pressure was coming and we really didn’t have the opportunity to get rid of the ball yet. So the timing was such that the rush got there before we had an opportunity to declare who was going to be running free or if anybody was going to get open. There’s a combination of things, as there always is.

Q: Despite having the three turnovers, you were plus-one in the turnover margin. Was this kind of an uncharacteristic game for you to win the turnover battle and force the Eagles into so many turnovers but really not capitalize on their mistakes?

A: Well, I think you just said it all. What more can be said? I started out by saying we had four turnovers and nothing to show for it. I think that’s a very, very unusual circumstance in any game. Usually when you do have an opportunity for those things to take place, and quite frankly, there probably could have been more. We could have had another, at least one more interception. We didn’t take advantage of anything and that’s disappointing. Momentum, the ebb and the flow, teams are going to surge, teams are going to have their plays, people are going to make plays, there’s going to be things that come up in the course of the game that give you an opportunity to take advantage of.  I was just disappointed we didn’t do any of that no matter when they came.

Q: You mentioned the lack of pressure you got on him. There weren’t a lot of blitzes in the game. How much was that the plan and how much was it the way it unfolded? What can you do moving forward to improve that pass rush?

A: Well first, there’s always a plan for pressure, without a doubt, but other things have to be taken into consideration as well. So you can add one, two to the list. When you do rush more than five, you obviously have some issues where you’re locked in and on the back end you’ve got to do a superb job of covering for that amount of time—you better get to the quarterback. You’re always going to have your pressure game. The extent of which it gets called has to do with a lot of things. You can always say you’re going to add to it, but you’ve got some other considerations as well. So aggressiveness, you want to maintain it, no matter how it comes about. It will all be looked at again going forward.

Q: Do you have an update on JPP? He’s supposed to be coming in this week for a re-check.

A: We’ll know more about that when it happens. I don’t really have a lot to talk about there.

Q: Do you just treat this as a bad game and move on from there or do you sit there and say, “We’ve got to change immediately?”

A: Well, it’s a bad game, it’s a bad production. We’ve got to be able to handle the big games. The games where things don’t go our way, we’ve got to handle them better. You’ve got handle those situations better. You’re going to always have your little adjustments to adapt to the team that you’re going to play that you may add something to or you may not do something as much of. But you are who you are, and you do have your scheme in hands and you’re going to stay within that scheme as you plan and go forward. You’re going to try and make the players understand how different this could have been had some things been taken advantage of, had we been able to score the second time we marched down there. Just the little teeny things that happen that each play becomes so monumental when you’re playing against a good football team. The third and one, the fourth and one, the opportunity to catch the ball, put it away and not let someone take it from you—all those things add to the winning and the losing and the ebb and the flow that take place during the game. So you’ll make some adjustments. For example, I thought we had some good runs. We had some good runs going for us and our balance might have been better had we been able to do something with the ball to make first downs, not shoot ourselves in the foot so often, there may have been even better balance. Frustration? Yeah, no question about, you can sense it in my voice. Especially when you’ve got a day where you don’t have your team around here. You’ve got tape to look at and the coaches to talk with, but at the same time, because of the nature of the week, you’ve got to move on to the next opponent. You’ve got to get moving.

Q: What about the scenario where, obviously, this year and last are so similar in a lot of ways?

A: That was last year, this is a new year. What am I worried about? I’m worried about getting our team ready for the Dallas Cowboys. Forget about last year. Last year was last year.

Q: You mentioned about keeping your chin up and not dwelling on the loss. How do prevent things from snowballing and preventing the turnovers when you play Dallas next week?

A: Well, you’ve got to shut the turnovers down, there’s no doubt about that. I think the conscientious effort on the part of everybody here will be directed at that. The players have definitely got that message, there’s no doubt. At the expense of anything else, both hands have got to go on the ball and you just can’t be careless, you just can’t. Especially when you go into a game with a team that is leading the league in forced fumbles. I just shake my head sometimes because we’re not aware of, and that’s an area of frustration as well. But remorse, the players will be remorseful because of the opportunity that we had. But let’s not forget there’s a long way to go, we are 3-3.

Q: Do you have any update on Victor Cruz? Any change in him?

A: No. I don’t have any update for you there.

Q: Has he been doing anything? Is it still just running underwater and stuff?

A: Yeah, he’s been on the treadmill, the underwater treadmill, yeah.

The audio of Tuesday’s WFAN Radio interviews with the following players available at CBS New York’s website:

The Giants are 3-12 in their last 15 regular-season games vs. Philadelphia.

The Giants have lost four consecutive NFC East road games.

The Giants fell to 23-36-1 on Monday Night Football, including 15-27-1 on the road, 1-7 vs. the Eagles, and 1-6 in Philadelphia.

The Giants have not rushed for at least 100 yards in any of their first six games. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, this is the first time the Giants have rushed for fewer than 100 yards in six consecutive games. They are the only NFL team without a 100-yard rushing game this season.


The players return to practice on Wednesday to start preparing for Sunday’s home game against the Dallas Cowboys.

Oct 182015
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Jerome Cunningham and Bennett Jackson, New York Giants (July 31, 2015)

Jerome Cunningham and Bennett Jackson – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Because of injury issues at cornerback, the New York Giants have signed cornerback Brandon McGee to the 53-man roster from the Practice Squad. To make room for McGee, the Giants waived tight end Jerome Cunningham.

The Giants are short-handed at cornerback due to injuries to Prince Amukamara (pectoral) and Trumane McBride (groin/illness). Amukamara has already been ruled out of the game on Monday night against the Philadelphia Eagles and McBride is questionable. The only other corners on the roster are Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, Jayron Hosley, and Trevin Wade.

The Giants signed McGhee to the Practice Squad on October 15. McGee was originally drafted in the 5th round of the 2013 NFL Draft by the St. Louis Rams. He played in 15 games in 2013 and two games in 2014 with no starts, accruing 18 tackles. He missed most of 2014 with a foot injury. In 2015, the Rams waived him in September, signed him to the Practice Squad and then the 53-man roster, and then waived him in October. McGee combines decent size with very good speed and quickness.

Cunningham has been with the Giants since August 2014. Troubled by a knee injury, he only played in one game this year, against the Falcons in Week 2.

The only New York Giants to not make the trip to Philadelphia were the ones already ruled out of the game: wide receiver Victor Cruz (calf), linebacker Devon Kennard (hamstring), and cornerback Prince Amukamara (pectoral).

The five “questionable” Giants all made the trip, including wide receiver Odell Beckham (hamstring), defensive end Robert Ayers (hamstring), linebacker Jon Beason (concussion), linebacker Jonathan Casillas (calf), and cornerback Trumaine McBride (groin/illness).

Wide receiver Rueben Randle (hamstring), left guard Justin Pugh (ankle), and defensive George Selvie (calf) are “probable” for the game and also made the trip.

According to multiple press reports, defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul will visit the Giants soon, possibly as early as Tuesday. This would be the second meeting between Pierre-Paul and the team since he maimed himself in a July 4th fireworks accident. Pierre-Paul met with the Giants in early September but the team determined he was not physically able to return to the football field at that time.

The New York Daily News is reporting that some within the Giants organization do not believe Pierre-Paul will be able to play football in 2015 given the extent of damage to his injured right hand.

Designated a $14.813 million Franchise Player by the Giants before free agency began, Pierre-Paul has lost approximately $871,000 for every week he has not played. If he does not re-sign with the Giants by 4:00PM on November 17, he cannot play football in 2015.