Oct 062013
 
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New York Giant Fan (October 6, 2013)

Ughhh…. – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Deeper Into the Abyss, the New York Giants Fall to 0-5: The Philadelphia Eagles defeated the New York Giants 36-21 on Sunday afternoon at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey. With the loss, the Giants have fallen to 0-5 (and 0-2 in the NFC East).

For the second week in a row, a close game got away from the Giants late. The game started off well for New York as the Giants’ defense forced a three-and-out on Philadelphia’s first possession. And the Giants quickly went up 7-0 as the G-Men drove 62 yards in five plays. The big play was a 49-yard pass from QB Eli Manning to WR Hakeem Nicks. Two plays later, RB David Wilson scored from five yards out.

After that, however, the New York Giants’ offense went dormant for the rest of the first half as one of the worst defenses in the NFL forced the Giants to punt four times and also caused RB Brandon Jacobs to fumble.

Meanwhile, the Eagles scored 19 unanswered points in the half, with one touchdown and four field goals. The Giants’ defense only forced one other punt in the first half and embarrassingly allowed QB Michael Vick to scramble for 34 yards on 3rd-and-20 on one of the field goal drives. (For some reason, Tom Coughlin accepted a holding penalty on the play preceding this snafu instead of declining it and making it 4th-and-4 near mid-field). Vick later would be forced to leave the game late in the second quarter with a hamstring injury, but back-up QB Nick Foles had no problem carving up the Giants’ defense.

Momentum swung back in favor of the Giants in the third quarter. After a three-and-out on their opening possession of the second half, New York scored touchdowns on their next two drives, both capped off with touchdown throws from Manning to WR Rueben Randle. The first drive was a 7-play, 87-yard affair with Randle scoring from 26 yards out. The next drive was a 7-play, 51-yard effort with Randle scoring from six yards out. The Giants led 21-19 late in the third quarter.

But the Eagles scored the next 17 points to run away with the game. An 8-play, 57-yard drive set up the go-ahead 41-yard field goal to make the game 22-21. The Giants went three-and-out and then Manning turned into a turnover machine, throwing interceptions on the next three drives. The Eagles quickly put the game away after the first two of these interceptions by scoring touchdowns, including on the first play after the first interception (a 25-yard pass to TE Brent Celek) and then a 4-play, 38-yard drive that ended with a 5-yard pass to WR DeSean Jackson. Game, set, and match.

“It all comes down to the interceptions,” said Coughlin after the game. “Two of them were just… almost unbelievable… There were a couple of those plays that were terrible… He’s way, way too good a player to have these kinds of things happen.”

Offensively, Manning finished the game 24-of-52 for 334 yards, two touchdowns, and three interceptions. Nicks caught nine passes for 142 yards, Randle six passes for 96 yards and two touchdowns, and Victor Cruz five catches for 48 yards. Brandon Jacobs only gained 37 yards on 11 carries and David Wilson 16 yards on six carries. The Giants were held to a measly 53 yards rushing.

Defensively, the Giants allowed the Eagles to accrue 439 total net yards including 299 net yards passing and 140 net yards rushing. Backup QB Nick Foles completed nine of his first eleven passes. The Giants’ defense did not force one turnover and only had one sack.

Video lowlights are available at NFL.com.

Injury Report: RB David Wilson left the game in the first quarter with a neck injury and did not return. The injury is not believed to be serious. DE Mathias Kiwanuka injured his ribs. S Cooper Taylor and LS Zak DeOssie had x-rays taken  for unknown injuries after the game.

Head Coach Tom Coughlin’s Post-Game Press Conference: The transcript and video of Head Coach Tom Coughlin’s post-game press conference are available at Giants.com.

Post-Game Player Media Q&As: Transcripts and video of the post-game media Q&As with the following players are available at Giants.com:

Post-Game Notes: Inactive for the Giants were QB Ryan Nassib, WR Louis Murphy (ankle), TE Adrien Robinson (foot), OC David Baas (neck), DT Linval Joseph (ankle/knee), CB Corey Webster (hip), and CB Jayron Hosley (hamstring).

Oct 032013
 
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David Wilson and David Diehl, New York Giants (August 24, 2013)

David Wilson and David Diehl – © USA TODAY Sports Images

October 3, 2013 New York Giants Injury Report – Webster Has a Setback: Not practicing on Thursday were DT Linval Joseph (ankle/knee), DT Cullen Jenkins (knee/achilles), CB Corey Webster (hip), CB Aaron Ross (back), CB Jayron Hosley (hamstring), OC David Baas (neck), OG Chris Snee (hip), and TE Adrien Robinson (foot).

It looks like the Giants may be without both of their starting defensive tackles and three of their cornerbacks on Sunday.

Webster, who has missed the last two games, did not practice on Thursday after working on a limited basis on Wednesday. “(Webster) worked a couple of plays yesterday and came out today and he was sore, so they held him out,” said Head Coach Tom Coughlin.

“(Joseph is) in a boot,” said Coughlin. “He actually has made pretty good progress, but at this point in time he does not have the green light.”

DT Shaun Rogers (back), LB Mark Herzlich (toe), and CB Terrell Thomas (knee) practiced on a limited basis.

DE Jason Pierre-Paul (knee), LB Jacquian Williams (knee), S Cooper Taylor (shoulder), and OT David Diehl (thumb) fully practiced.

Diehl to Start at Right Guard: David Diehl revealed on Thursday that he will start at right guard in place of James Brewer this weekend against the Philadelphia Eagles. Will Beatty will remain at left tackle, Kevin Booth at left guard, Jim Cordle at center, and Justin Pugh at right tackle.

New York Giants Coach Media Q&As: Transcripts and video clips of Thursday’s media sessions with the following coaches are available at Giants.com:

New York Giants Player Media Q&As: Transcripts and video of Thursday’s media Q&As with the following players are available at Giants.com:

Article on General Manager Jerry Reese: Jerry Reese Needs to Answer for the Giants’ 0-4 start by Steve Politi of The Star-Ledger

Article on Head Coach Tom Coughlin: Tom Coughlin Not Immune if NY Giants Skid Continues by Ralph Vacchiano of The Daily News

Article on DE Jason Pierre-Paul, WR Hakeem Nicks, and RB David Wilson: First-Round Fizzles Behind Giants’ 0-4 Flop by Steve Serby of The New York Post

Article on the New York Giants Offense: Offensive Woes Suggest the Giants Are Behind the Times by Jonathan Clegg of The Wall Street Journal

Article on OC Jim Cordle: Jim Cordle and O-Line Subs Look to Improve by Dan Salomone of Giants.com

Article on S Will Hill: In His Own Words: Giants S Will Hill Looks for Fresh Start as Suspension Ends by Conor Orr of The Star-Ledger

Sep 292013
 
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Spencer Paysinger (52), New York Giants (September 29, 2013)

The Defense Played Tough for Three Quarters – © USA TODAY Sports Images

The New York Giants Fall to 0-4: The Kansas City Chiefs defeated the New York Giants 31-7 on Sunday afternoon at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri. With the loss, the Giants fall to 0-4. The last time the Giants started 0-4 was in 1987, with two of those losses being replacement games during the NFL strike.

“Coming into the season, if you told me I was 0-4, I wouldn’t have believed you,” WR Victor Cruz said after the game.

“Right now we’re low as you can get,” said DE Justin Tuck. “We’re going to find a way to right this ship. Or we’re going to die trying.”

The game was closer than the final score would indicate. For the most part, the Giants’ defense performed adequately but received no support from the offense and special teams.

The Chiefs led the Giants 17-7 at the start of the fourth quarter, the difference being a successful 51-yard field goal by the Chiefs, a 44-yard missed field goal by PK Josh Brown, and an 89-yard punt return for a touchdown by the Chiefs late in the third quarter. A 43-yard punt return by WR Rueben Randle was also called back by an unnecessary block-in-the-back penalty on DE Justin Trattou.

The only real significant defensive lapse for three quarters was the 11-play, 98-yard scoring drive on the Chiefs’ third possession of the game. The Giants, however, quickly responded with a 2-play, 74-yard touchdown drive with the touchdown coming on a 69-yard pass from QB Eli Manning to WR Victor Cruz.

The Giants did very little on offense the rest of the game as New York was 1-of-14 on third down (7 percent) while the Chiefs were 9-of-16 on third down (56 percent). The Giants had six first-half possessions. They had the one big scoring play, but also punted three times and turned the football over when Manning was sacked and fumbled the ball away. The Giants had a chance to tie the game at the end of the first half, but Brown missed the field goal.

In the second half, the Giants could not pick up one first down in their first five possessions of the third quarter. In all, in the third and fourth quarters, the Giants punted five times, turned the ball over twice (one interception and one fumble), and turned the ball over on downs late in the game.

Defensively in the second half, the Giants picked off QB Alex Smith twice and forced two punts in the third quarter. But in the fourth quarter, the defense finally broke by giving up a 14-play, 80-yard touchdown drive (which was extended by a special teams penalty) and a 3-play, 35-yard yard touchdown drive after a fumble by RB Da’Rel Scott.

Offensively, Manning finished the game 18-of-37 for 217 yards, one touchdown, and one interception. RB David Wilson had 55 yards on 13 carries. Cruz caught 10 passes for 164 yards and one touchdown.

Defensively, linebackers Mark Herzlich (8) and Spencer Paysinger (7) led the team in tackles. Paysinger was also credited with one sack and recovered a fumble. S Antrel Rolle and CB Prince Amukamara each had interceptions.

“The coach said once we’re fed up with how we’re playing, we’ll do something about it,” Tuck said. “Obviously we’re not fed up yet.”

Video lowlights are available at NFL.com.

Injury Report: LB Mark Herzlich injured his toe in the game. X-rays were negative, but Herzlich was wearing a protective boot in the locker room. DE Jason Pierre-Paul suffered a knee contusion. DE Justin Tuck injured his neck but returned to the game. CB Jayron Hosley strained his hamstring and did not return. CB Aaron Ross injured his back and was replaced by CB Trumaine McBride.

Post-Game Press Conference Highlights from Coughlin and Manning: Video highlights from the post-game press conferences with Head Coach Tom Coughlin and QB Eli Manning are available at NFL.com.

Post-Game Player Media Q&As: Video clips of the post-game media Q&As with the following players are available at Giants.com:

Post-Game Notes: Inactive for the Giants were QB Ryan Nassib, TE Adrien Robinson (foot), OC David Baas (neck), OG Chris Snee (hip), DT Johnathan Hankins, CB Corey Webster (hip), and S Cooper Taylor (shoulder).

Sep 232013
 
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Justin Tuck, New York Giants (September 22, 2013)

Where is the Fight? – © USA TODAY Sports Images

September 23, 2013 New York Giants Injury Report: There was no word on Monday about the status of FB Henry Hynoski, who fractured his left shoulder in the New York Giants-Carolina Panthers game on Sunday.

According to press reports, OC David Baas (neck) and OG Chris Snee (hip) underwent MRI’s on Monday.

“I think (Snee has) got some issues,” Head Coach Tom Coughlin said. “We’re trying to figure out where that is right now. Also David Baas has some issues.”

Head Coach Tom Coughlin’s Press Conference: The transcript and video of Head Coach Tom Coughlin’s Monday press conference are available at Giants.com.

Player Media Q&As: Transcripts and video of Monday’s media Q&As with the following players are available at Giants.com:

QB Eli Manning on WFAN: The audio of Monday’s WFAN interview with QB Eli Manning is available CBSNewYork.com

Articles on the 2013 New York Giants:

Sep 202013
 
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Corey Webster, New York Giants (September 8, 2013)

Corey Webster – © USA TODAY Sports Images

September 20, 2013 New York Giants Injury Report: Not practicing on Friday were CB Corey Webster (hip), TE Adrien Robinson (foot), and OT David Diehl (thumb). Webster is officially listed as “doubtful” for the game against the Carolina Panthers on Sunday. Robinson and Diehl will not play.

“Evidently (Webster) has an issue with his hip flexor, in that area somewhere,” said Head Coach Tom Coughlin, “and he couldn’t practice yesterday and couldn’t practice today.”

QB Ryan Nassib (foot) and OG Brandon Mosley (back) practiced on a limited basis. Both players are officially listed as “probable” for the game.

WR Hakeem Nicks was excused from practice for personal reasons, but is expected to play on Sunday.

Head Coach Tom Coughlin’s Press Conference: The transcript and video of Head Coach Tom Coughlin’s Friday press conference are available at Giants.com.

Giants.com Q&A With Head Coach Tom Coughlin: Coughlin Corner: Emotional Tug of War by Michael Eisen of Giants.com

Player Media Q&As: Transcripts and video of Friday’s media Q&As with the following players are available at Giants.com:

Article on the 2013 New York Giants: NY Giants Deserve Benefit of Doubt by Ralph Vacchiano of The Daily News

Articles on Head Coach Tom Coughlin:

Article on the Giants’ Offensive Line: Giants Shifting O-Line Can’t Key Together to Create Holes by Paul Schwartz of The New York Post

Article on DE Jason Pierre-Paul: Giants’ Jason Pierre-Paul Seeks Breakout Game by Art Stapleton of The Bergen Record

Article on LB Spencer Paysinger: Giants Defense Puts Faith in Paysinger by Jeff Roberts of The Bergen Record

Article on S Stevie Brown: Stevie Brown’s ACL Surgery: 63 Minutes to a New Knee by Jenny Vrentas of SI.com

Quotes: Head Coach Tom Coughlin on TE Larry Donnell: “When he was a free agent tight end a year ago before he got himself hurt. He’s athletic and he’s big. He can run, he wants to. I love ‘want to’s.’ I want every guy to have the same passion that he did when somebody said, ‘Sign this and you can be a Giant.’ That’s what I’m looking for. This kid’s got it. He’s got it. Now he’s green as that grass right there, but I like that, too, to be honest with you. Every day is a new day. But he wants to, he wants to.”

Aug 032013
 
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George Martin, Bill Parcells, New York Giants (August 3, 2013)

George Martin and Bill Parcells – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Bill Parcells Enshrined Into the Hall of Fame: Bill Parcells, who served as Giants’ defensive coordinator and linebackers coach (1981-1982) and head coach (1983-1990), was officially enshrined into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday. Former Giants’ defensive end George Martin (1975-1988) introduced Parcells. Giants’ co-owner Ann Mara, President/CEO John Mara, and Head Coach Tom Coughlin were in attendance for the ceremony.

For a complete list of Giants in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, see the Hall of Fame section of the website.

August 3, 2013 New York Giants Training Camp Reports: The Giants held their seventh training camp practice on Saturday afternoon at the Quest Diagnostics Training Center. The next practice is on Sunday from 1:30-3:45PM, but this practice is closed to the public. For a complete training camp schedule and Giants.com Q&A guide, see the Training Camp section of the website.

Injury Update: Not practicing on Saturday were WR Hakeem Nicks (groin), CB Corey Webster (groin), OL Justin Pugh (concussion), FB Henry Hynoski (PUP – knee), OG Chris Snee (PUP – hip), DE Jason Pierre-Paul (PUP – back), DT Markus Kuhn (PUP – knee), and CB Terrell Thomas (PUP – knee).

“(Pugh is) getting better,” said Head Coach Tom Coughlin. “He’s feeling better.”

“(Webster) does (feel better),” said Coughlin. “But he seems to be doing okay. Hopefully it’s not going to be long.”

“I would hope (Nicks will practice on Tuesday),” said Coughlin. “That’s the plan.”

Coach Media Q&As: Transcripts and video clips of Saturday’s media sessions with the following coaches are available at Giants.com or BigBlueInteractive.com:

Player Media Q&As: Transcripts and video of Saturday’s media Q&As with the following players are available at Giants.com or BigBlueInteractive.com:

Articles on Head Coach Tom Coughlin:

Articles on the Running Backs:

Article on OT David Diehl: Diehl to Haters: ‘Keep Bringing It’ by Ohm Youngmisuk of ESPNNewYork.com

Articles on the Defensive Line:

Article on the Linebackers: Linebacker Spots Up for Grabs at NY Giants Training Camp by Ebenezer Samuel of The Daily News

Article on the Defensive Backs: For Giants Secondary, Communication is the Key by Dave Hutchinson of The Star-Ledger

Articles on Former Giants’ Head Coach Bill Parcells:

Quotes: Tight Ends Coach Mike Pope on tight ends Adrien Robinson and Larry Donnell: “We want to get Adrien on the field. He’s a terrific target and runs well. We’d like to see if Larry Donnell can make a contribution. Certainly size and talent-wise, he has that. But he missed all the spring and mini-camps because of a broken foot, so he’s virtually just starting right now. So, how fast can those guys grow? The faster they grow, the more effective we’re going to be. I do think we have, size-wise, the biggest group I’ve ever worked with. These guys are 278, 280, 282, and they can run fairly well. We haven’t had that around here since I’ve been here. That’s since 1982. We haven’t had that size player. So that should add to our running game on the edge, and should enable us to block some of these defensive ends and some of these outside linebackers that are in this league now. Hopefully, with the quickness and speed of our running backs, that can be a huge contribution: the way we block the edge of the offense and are more effective in the run game.”

Jul 272013
 
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Trumaine McBride (38), Tyler Sash (39), New York Giants (July 27, 2013)

Trumaine McBride Breaks Up a Pass – © USA TODAY Sports Images

July 27, 2013 New York Giants Training Camp Reports: The Giants’ first training camp practice was held Saturday afternoon at the Quest Diagnostics Training Center. The next practice is on Sunday from 1:30-3:45PM. For a complete training camp schedule and Giants.com Q&A guide, see the Training Camp section of the website.

Injury Update on JPP, Snee, and Thomas: Not practicing on Saturday were FB Henry Hynoski (PUP – knee), OG Chris Snee (PUP – hip), DE Jason Pierre-Paul (PUP – back), DT Markus Kuhn (PUP – knee), and CB Terrell Thomas (PUP – knee). LB Aaron Curry left early with a cramp.

Snee was asked if he would be out a long time. “No, I wouldn’t think it would be too long but I don’t know,” replied Snee. “I feel pretty good, I’ll really just take this week and just condition hard and see how it feels after that…I’m not 100 percent, so why rush back?”

“I still need to get in the preseason games and get those reps,” said Snee. “I wouldn’t feel comfortable going into a regular season opener without having played some preseason games. Now, do I want to take 40 snaps a game? No. But I need to get some practice reps and some game reps. I’ll get those in.”

“I feel like I’m at, I’d say, 75%,” said Pierre-Paul. “I’ve been doing everything they ask me to, working with the trainers…(Compared to last year) the whole discomfort is gone. When I sit down now I don’t have that pain anymore, stand up I don’t have that pain, I can stand up straight, basically everything is gone. The surgery went well. Doing pretty good.”

“I don’t know (if I’ll be ready for the opener),” said Pierre-Paul. “Only time can tell. It’s all on me, how I recover…The back is a really, really horrible pain to have, and back surgery period. And you don’t want to rush back. I’m not concentrated on the first game, second game, third game, fourth game, fifth game, sixth game, I’m just trying to come back when I feel like I’m ready to come back.”

“(Pierre-Paul has) done very well and he’s worked hard at it,” said Head Coach Tom Coughlin. “I’d say he’s probably within a couple of pounds of his playing weight. I’d say that with what he’s allowed to do, he does well. He has a specific routine that he does in the training room and he’s been able to do that well. So I am encouraged…He’s made good progress and he’s made it relatively fast.”

“(Thomas is) restricted in what he can do,” said Coughlin. “We’re all frustrated about it. He is himself, number one. The sooner he can get out there, the better off we’ll all be. And he came in fully feeling like he could start right out in practice and just wasn’t able to do that right away. We’ll be patient, but know full well that we’re all excited the moment he gets a chance to come out and practice and we get a sense of where he is, how he’s going to be and that type of thing.”

Jerry Reese Addresses the Press: The transcript and video of General Manager Jerry Reese’s press conference on Saturday is available at Giants.com.

Head Coach Tom Coughlin’s Saturday Press Conference: The transcript and video of Head Coach Tom Coughlin’s press conference on Saturday are available at BigBlueInteractive.com and Giants.com, respectively.

Player Media Q&As: Transcripts and video of Saturday’s media Q&As with the following players are available at Giants.com:

 

Jul 092013
 
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FB Vonta Leach Still in Play for New York Giants: According to The Star-Ledger, FB Vonta Leach, who was released by the Baltimore Ravens last month, is still considering the Giants as a possible place to sign. Leach is receiving interest from a number of teams and it is has long been expected that he will sign with the Miami Dolphins, a team with a lot of salary cap space.

WR Victor Cruz on WFAN: The audio of today’s WFAN interview with WR Victor Cruz is available at CBS New York

Giants.com Q&A With WR Victor Cruz: The video of yesterday’s Giants.com interview with WR Victor Cruz is available at Giants.com.

Giants’ Beat Reporter Paul Dottino Breaks Down Cruz’s Deal: The video of today’s NFL Network interview with Giants’ beat reporter Paul Dottino analyzing WR Victor Cruz’s new contract is available at NFL.com.

Giants.com Q&A With Defensive Line Coach Robert Nunn: The video of a Giants.com Q&A with Defensive Line Coach Robert Nunn is available at Giants.com.

Star-Ledger Q&A With LB Spencer Paysinger: Giants Summer Questionnaire: Spencer Paysinger by Dave Hutchinson of The Star-Ledger

Article on WR Hakeem Nicks: Hakeem Nicks Must Prove He’s Worth More Than Victor Cruz for the Giants by Steve Politi of The Star-Ledger

2013 Position Preview – Defensive End:video previewing the Giants’ defensive end position heading into training camp is available at Giants.com.

Quotes: WR Victor Cruz on WR Hakeem Nicks: “Oh, yeah, I’m definitely going to put the pressure on him to come back and see if he wants to play with me for the long haul. We’ll see how it goes, but Hakeem’s his own man, he’s going to make his own decision. But I’m definitely going to see if I can get him to stay with me for a couple years…I’m concerned as a teammate and a friend because I want to see Hakeem around in Giants blue for as long as we’re together in the National Football League. There’s ways to create space, there’s ways to do things. That’s a road the Giants have to cross when they get there.’’

Jun 172013
 
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Mark Herzlich, New York Giants (August 18, 2012)

Mark Herzlich – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Offseason Breakdown: New York Giants Linebackers

The linebacker position on the Giants has been unsettled for quite some time. For the older fans, who had the pleasure to watch players such as Sam Huff, Harry Carson, Brad Van Pelt, Lawrence Taylor, Carl Banks, and Jessie Armstead, it has been frustrating.

When the Giants shifted from a 3-4 defense to a 4-3 defense in the 1990s, the personnel emphasis naturally shifted from spending premium resources on linebackers to defensive linemen. And that trend has continued under General Manager Jerry Reese.

Since Reese became general manager of the Giants in 2007, in seven drafts, the Giants have drafted seven linebackers, including players in the second, fourth, fifth, and sixth rounds. Only two remain on the roster – sixth-rounders Adrian Tracy and Jacquian Williams. Tracy, a defensive end in college, was drafted as a linebacker and has since been moved back to defensive end. Gone by the wayside are Bryan Kehl, Jonathan Goff, Clint Sintim, Phillip Dillard, and Greg Jones.

In free agency under Reese, the Giants have signed Kawika Mitchell, Danny Clark, Michael Boley, Keith Bulluck, Dan Connor, Aaron Curry, and Kyle Bosworth. The latter three were signed this offseason.

The Giants also traded away their fifth round pick in the 2012 NFL Draft for Keith Rivers.

It’s obviously too early to comment on Connor, Curry, and Bosworth, but of all of the rest, since 2007, only Boley became an established, multi-year starter for the Giants. (After four seasons as a starter, Boley was released this offseason). If we’re being honest, to date, Reese’s track record in addressing the linebacking position has not been good.

With Boley and free agent departure Chase Blackburn no longer on the roster, and Mathias Kiwanuka moving back to defensive end, the Giants will have three new starters at linebacker in 2013. That’s quite a turnover. And it is conceivable that the three new starters in 2013 will be castoffs Rivers, Connor, and Curry. In fact, if you could turn back the clock and tell a Giants fan in April 2008 that the Rivers, Connor, and Curry would be starting for Big Blue in few years, the response would have been, “How the hell did Reese pull that off?” We’ll have to see if they can turn their careers around and regain former collegiate glory.

The Giants currently have nine linebackers on the roster. They will probably keep seven on the 53-man roster, especially since linebackers usually make good special teams players. But it is possible that they could keep as few as six.

“(Our linebackers) actually had a good spring,” said Head Coach Tom Coughlin at the end of mini-camp. “And the good thing about them, they are very unselfish. They work hard; they study hard. If I called for a one hour meeting, those guys were probably going to meet for an hour and a half to two. It is just the way that group is. They have been good. So we’ll see. I have seen some growth and I have seen a lot of good things happen out here. They are going to have to. It’s going to have to happen.”

Let’s look at each of these nine players:

Dan Connor: A highly-regarded Penn State linebacker coming out of the 2008 NFL Draft, Connor was originally selected in the 3rd round by the Carolina Panthers. He signed with the Cowboys as a free agent in March 2012. Connor was then signed by the Giants in March 2013 after he was released by the Dallas. In five NFL seasons, Connor has played in 56 regular-season games with 27 starts. In 2012, Connor started eight games for the Cowboys and finished the season with 56 tackles and one pass defense. Connor has decent size, but lacks athleticism. He is more of a tough, blue-collar, two-down run defender who sometimes struggles in pass coverage. Connor is not overly physical at the point-of-attack, but he is quick to locate the ball, avoids blocks well, and is a good, solid tackler. He can play inside or outside, but he definitely is more comfortable in a 4-3 scheme. Connor’s biggest problem has been staying healthy.

“I think (middle linebacker is my best) position,” Connor said. “That’s the position where I’m comfortable. I played it in college, I was in the middle of a 4-3 in Carolina. So I feel most comfortable in the middle. But I do have some experience on the outside.”

“It’s all about being technique-perfect and being able to call the defense, make the checks and be spot on,” Connor said. “As a new guy in the locker room, that’s how I’m going to earn respect – by knowing not only my position but everyone else’s position. So studying is big for me right now, being vocal on the field, and basically earn the respect of guys who I met (only recently).”

Connor’s chief competition at middle linebacker, Mark Herzlich, has been impressed by Connor. “Dan is a very intelligent player,” said Herzlich. “He’s very good with his reads and his fits. He’s very precise.”

“Run fits have been a point of emphasis, making sure everyone is in the right place at the right time,” said Connor. “The coaches have done a great job teaching us the mistakes that were made last season.”

“We’re looking forward to the challenge,” said Connor. “We have a lot of young guys. They’re hungry. Each one of us feels like we want to put our name on the map. I really like this defense. It lets you play fast and play aggressive.”

Aaron Curry: In the 2009 NFL Draft, Curry was widely-regarded as one of the best linebacking prospects in years and “the safest pick” in the draft. The Seattle Seahawks made him the fourth player selected overall in that draft, but Curry never lived up to his draft hype and was traded to the Raiders during the 2011 season for a 7th round pick and conditional 5th round pick. Curry played better in Oakland, but he was hampered by chronic knee issues and was cut.

Physically, Curry has excellent size and strength. Although he lacks ideal lateral agility, when healthy, he is a very good athlete who runs well. For some reason, it hasn’t come together for Curry at the pro level. Critics have pointed to the lack of big plays, inconsistency, poor coverage, and too often being out of position.

Curry says his problem in Seattle was that he was not focused on football. “Early in my career, I was just selfish and self-centered,” said Curry. “I was more about me than I was about the Seahawks. It was immaturity, and I’m glad I got past that stage…It was like I knew I could do it and I knew I would do it. I just don’t think at the time I was interested in doing it. I think I was interested in other things and at the time football just wasn’t my top priority, just to be honest…(Now) I approach everything differently. I see details now. Football is important now. It has a priority in my life that I’m willing to do whatever it takes that’s going to help the Giants be successful and I’m not so selfish…Now I’m more about finding a way to just put out a lot of effort and a lot of energy and just cause havoc.”

Curry’s biggest issue now may be the health of his knees. Curry underwent stem-cell therapy on both of his knees during the 2012 offseason. He only played two games before he was cut in November. He then underwent arthroscopic surgery on his right knee in December.

Curry’s former linebacker coach in Seattle, Ken Norton, is still a believer if Curry is healthy. “He was a 4-3 linebacker playing off the ball and you’re not going to get sacks,” Norton said. “He’s probably the best linebacker I’ve ever had to play over the tight end and just dominate him. There were a whole lot of expectations. You don’t see the sack numbers and people say this guy isn’t doing what he’s supposed to be doing. At the end, his legs and knees were hurting a lot and he was unable to stop on a dime. He couldn’t do all the things he was supposed to do.”

“If Aaron’s health isn’t an issue, if he can run and stop and hit, I mean, this kid hasn’t scratched the surface,” Norton said. “He can do a lot of amazing things. He does things that Carl Banks used to do on the tight end. Once he gets his mind set on something, he can do it. The only issue with him has been what’s going on between the ears. If everything is in order and he’s to the point where he has something to prove, the Giants might have caught him at the right time.”

“I hope to be able to offer some positive energy (to the defense),” said Curry. “I just want to run around and hit things that are moving and I want my teammates to get excited. I want the defense to be excited at all times and I hope to be able to just uplift everybody and do what’s asked of me and do it full speed…My job and my only motivation is to go out there, play hard, play fast, be physical and get my teammates to just be fired up with me and just bring a positive energy every day.”

Keith Rivers: If Curry was supposed to be a “sure thing”, then Rivers was pretty damn close. Rivers was the ninth player taken in the 2008 NFL Draft. But the injury-prone linebacker was traded by the Bengals to the Giants in 2012 for a 5th round draft pick.

While Rivers never lived up to his draft hype in Cincinnati, he was a solid player for the Bengals when he played. The problem was that he couldn’t stay healthy and that trend continued with the Giants in 2012. Last season, hamstring and calf injuries caused him to miss five games and limited his playing time and effectiveness. Rivers finished the season with six starts and accrued 44 tackles. In four seasons in Cincinnati, Rivers started 33-of-35 regular-season games he played in. But he missed 29 regular-season games with injuries – including nine games in 2008 with a broken jaw and all of the 2011 season with a wrist injury that required surgery. Rivers also missed time in 2009 with a calf injury and in 2010 with plantar fasciitis. Rivers is an athletic, three-down linebacker. He is more of the run-and-hit type than physical presence at the point-of-attack against the run. Rivers has the overall athletic ability and range to do well in coverage, but he needs to become more consistent in that area of his game. He only has two career sacks.

Interestingly, Giants’ beat reporter Paul Dottino, who also does some work for the Giants, says Rivers was clearly the best linebacker in training camp last year. During spring workouts, Rivers was starting at weakside linebacker in Mathias Kiwanuka’s old position. (Note: In Perry Fewell’s system, the weakside linebacker is called the strongside linebacker).

During OTAs, Coughlin said, “The other day Keith Rivers made a heck of a play.” Rivers has the ability to be a very steady performer for New York if he can just stay on the football field.

Mark Herzlich: Herzlich was regarded as one of the better collegiate linebackers in the country before missing the 2009 season at Boston College with bone cancer. Because of the illness, a titanium rod was inserted into Herzlich’s left femur. Herzlich has very good size, but the key question is whether Herzlich now has the overall athletic ability to excel at the pro level. Last year, it was anticipated that Herzlich would provide more of a serious challenge to Chase Blackburn for the starting middle linebacker position, but Herzlich underwhelmed.

Herzlich has had a very good spring. It was Herzlich, not Dan Connor, who started at middle linebacker during spring workouts and the coaches appear to have come away impressed.

“Very commanding,” said Defensive Coordinator Perry Fewell. “He’s taken a leadership role out there and I think he has some good respect from his teammates in some of the things he’s done in the OTAs. Obviously, we want to find out what happens when the pads come on.”

“After the first OTA, (Spencer Paysinger and I) always go and watch the films,” said Herzlich. “Me and Spence were watching film, and we’re like, ‘We’re gonna know this defense better than the coaches.’ So we went to Costco that day, got dry erase boards. I was on the dry erase board all day, just reviewing everything from OTAs, getting ready for mini-camp. That way, when you eliminate the mental mistakes, you can play faster and more physical.”

“As linebackers, you never want to be called ‘soft,’” said Herzlich. “There were some people saying that we were playing soft last year. So we have a mentality to change that this season…We’ve talked about how we couldn’t stop the run when we needed to last season. People say, ‘It’s the defensive line.’ But it starts with the linebackers. We have to fill our gaps and play downhill.”

Connor may overtake Herzlich in training camp and the preseason, but right now, it’s Herzlich’s job to lose.

Spencer Paysinger: Paysinger was signed as an undrafted rookie free agent after the 2011 NFL Draft. While serving primarily as one of the Giants’ best special teams players, Paysinger has seen his playing time on the defense increase. He actually started three games in 2012 and finished the season with 39 tackles and one forced fumble. Paysinger has a nice combination of size and athleticism.

Paysinger appears to be flying under the radar scope of many fans. In spring workouts, Paysinger has been starting in Michael Boley’s old strongside linebacker spot. If Paysinger fails, it will not be for lack of hard work. In the offseason, he initiated an intense workout program that not only included weight training, but hot yoga, acupuncture, stretching, and martial arts.

“I came into the league two years ago at 233 pounds and now I’m about 245 pounds and I feel like I haven’t lost a step,” said Paysinger. “When you get heavier, bigger, and bulkier, it’s natural for you to lose a step or two when it comes to agility. By doing yoga and acupuncture and revving up my on-field work, it’s allowed me to counteract any lost steps.”

“(Paysinger) is doing a good job,” said Linebackers Coach Jim Herrmann. “He has a great opportunity to get snaps. And he is competing for the job. He has matured over the last two years. To me, the biggest thing I have seen was his maturity level, because he is comfortable with the formation. Now he is going to go out and take the next step forward because he is anticipating the plays faster and faster. He’s not worried about ‘What do I do in this defense – What do I do in that defense?’ It is, ‘Okay, I know what I am doing – now what is the offense going to do?’ And he is anticipating. And all of those guys have done a much better job of that.”

“Me and Mark (Herzlich), we’ve taken it upon ourselves to learn the defense in and out, studying together,” said Paysinger. “Buying dry erase boards to take home and just draw up plays. Pretty much internalizing the playbook to where it becomes second nature – cause if you know your stuff, you can play that much better.”

“I feel like it’s my time, Mark’s time, even Keith (Rivers’) time to step up and show we can handle this,” said Paysinger.

Jacquian Williams: Williams was drafted in the 6th round of the 2011 NFL Draft by the Giants. He was a very raw player coming out of the University of South Florida, having started only one season. Williams lacks bulk, but he is extremely athletic, fast, and quick for the position. However, Williams is not very physical and due to his size, he can get mauled at the point-of-attack against the run. Williams flashes as a blitzer and he could develop into a good coverage linebacker with added experience.

Williams’ 2012 season was sabotaged by a PCL knee injury he suffered in October that caused him to miss six games. He finished the year with just 30 tackles, down from the 78 he accrued in 2011. Though Williams returned to the playing field in December 2012, the PCL injury surprisingly limited him in the spring workouts this year. Hopefully, he will be closer to 100 percent when training camp starts.

Kyle Bosworth: The nephew of former Seahawks’ linebacker Brian Bosworth, Kyle was signed by the Giants as an unrestricted free agent from the Jaguars in May 2013. Eligible to be a restricted free agent, Bosworth was not tendered by Jacksonville. Bosworth was originally signed as an undrafted rookie free agent by the Jaguars after the 2010 NFL Draft. He spent his rookie season on Injured Reserve with a hamstring injury. He also missed much of 2011 after being placed on Injured Reserve in November with a broken hand. In 2012, Bosworth played in all 16 games. He started five games but was later benched. He finished 2012 with 37 tackles and one interception.

Bosworth is smart, hard-working, and versatile – he can play all three linebacking spots. However, despite having decent size, strength, and some speed, Bosworth is a limited athlete who struggles in space. Bosworth is a very good special teams player and that – combined with his versatility and intelligence – may give him a leg up in the competition for backup spots.

“We felt like he would make a nice fit as a linebacker and a special-teamer,” said Coughlin after Bosworth was signed.

“I can definitely play all the (linebacker) positions,” Bosworth said. “I’ve still got to do a lot of learning in the playbook, but I’m able to fit in with the (weakside, middle, and strongside linebacker). I’m very versatile. I’ve played and started. I’ve been on every single special team, so basically wherever they need me I’ll be able to do it. Whatever they ask and I’ll be ready to go.”

Jake Muasau: Muasau was originally signed by the Giants as a rookie free agent after the May 2012 rookie mini-camp. The Giants waived him in late August, but decided to give him another shot in training camp this year and re-signed him in January 2013. Muasau was voted Georgia State University’s most valuable defensive player by his teammates in 2010 and 2011 when he played the “bandit” DE/LB hybrid position. Muasau has good size and plays with good intensity.

Etienne Sabino: Sabino was signed by the Giants as a rookie free agent after the 2013 NFL Draft. Sabino was a highly-recruited high school linebacker who had a disappointing overall career at Ohio State, but he started to come on as a senior despite breaking his leg. He could project to either middle or outside linebacker. Sabino is a well-built athlete with good agility, quickness, and speed. He flashes ability to run-and-hit as well as take-on-and-shed. There are conflicting scouting reports on his instincts. Sabino should do well on special teams. He supposedly has good intangibles – mature and coachable.

Summary: The starters heading into training camp are Rivers, Herzlich, and Paysinger. But they will be challenged by Curry, Connor, and Williams. It will be interesting to see if there are three viable starters and play-makers within this group, and if the three new starters can integrate themselves with each other and the other eight members of the defense quickly. Not many teams completely revamp their starting linebacking corps in one offseason. For a defense that finished 31st in 2012 and was equally bad against the run and the pass, it is imperative that the linebacking play improve.

May 202013
 
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Corey Webster (23), Kenny Phillips (21), Justin Tuck (91), New York Giants (September 5, 2012)

Corey Webster, Kenny Phillips, and Justin Tuck – © USA TODAY Sports Images

The State of the New York Giants Defense

Memories are often short for NFL fans. The long offseason, with excitement of numerous roster subtractions and additions, can overshadow recent failure. It’s an exciting time for fans, but it is important to remember that the ultimate goal is not to make noise in the offseason, but to make noise on the playing field when the games count.

Aside from a six-game stretch at the end of the 2011 season, the New York Giants defense has been putrid for the last two seasons. It was 27th in yards allowed in 2011 and 31st in yards allowed in 2012. It has had trouble stopping the run (25th in 2012) and the pass (28th in 2012). Indeed, if it were not for 35 takeaways (2nd in the NFL), the defensive stats, including scoring defense (12th in 2012), would surely have been much worse. Personally, I never think it is wise to count on being a league leader in takeaways. Too much luck is involved.

For better or worse, many of core defensive players are now gone: DE Osi Umenyiora, DT Chris Canty, LB Michael Boley, LB Chase Blackburn, and S Kenny Phillips. DT Rocky Bernard also will not be re-signed.

New faces include veteran free agents DT Cullen Jenkins, DT Mike Patterson, DT Frank Okam, LB Dan Connor, LB Aaron Curry, and S Ryan Mundy – all but Jenkins signed to only 1-year contracts. Also added to the mix were rookie draft picks DT Johnathan Hankins, DE Damontre Moore, and S Cooper Taylor.

There still may be a move or two, but the roster heading into camp is largely set. More tweaking could occur in late August and early September when teams make their final cuts.

Obviously, there has been a lot of change. But will change lead to improved results on the playing field both in the short-term and medium-term? Has the talent actually improved? Moving beyond 2013, key veteran holdovers such as DE Justin Tuck, CB Corey Webster, and S Antrel Rolle are aging and taking up too much salary cap space. DT Linval Joseph will be a free agent and DE Jason Pierre-Paul will want a new contract soon. Who will the front office and coaching staff determine to be the core defensive players to build around on this team moving forward? Who will be the defensive leaders? Can Defensive Coordinator Perry Fewell restructure the various moving parts into an effective, cohesive unit in 2013 and beyond? Yes, there is change in every offseason, but there is a pretty significant changing of the guard on defense. Can it all come together quickly?

Defensive Line: Except for Pierre-Paul’s play in 2011 and late season flashes from everyone else that same season, this unit has largely lived off its reputation rather than consistent play on the football field. And because of that, gone are Umenyiora, Canty, and Bernard. Tuck could be next in 2014.

On paper, the defensive line is still the strongest position on defense. There are 16 bodies present and all of them have talent. The Giants will probably keep five defensive ends and the sure bets are Tuck, Pierre-Paul, Mathias Kiwanuka, and Damontre Moore. But Adrian Tracy, Adewale Ojomo, Justin Trattou, and Matt Broha have all flashed as players. Based on early impressions, it appears that Tuck is reinvigorated to have a big season, if for no other reason than his next contract with the Giants or another team. But he has been physically beat-up and quite moody in recent years. JPP also needs to rebound from a sackless second half if he wants a big-money contract. Kiwanuka should move back to his more natural position with something to prove as well. Moore has exciting potential, but he needs a lot of work in the weight room. If the Giants think Tuck is likely to depart in 2014, can they find a way to hold onto six defensive ends this year?

The Giants added a lot of new bodies at defensive tackle. Due to injuries and declining play, this was necessary. Linval Joseph returns. He has a lot of talent but he needs to be more effectively consistent on the playing field. Cullen Jenkins should add veteran leadership and a pass rush presence. Johnathan Hankins is the type of stout, double team-eating nose tackle that this team has lacked. That leaves one or two spots for Mike Patterson, Shaun Rogers, Markus Kuhn, Marvin Austin, and Frank Okam. Austin is the three-technique, pass rusher of the group. Rogers and Okam are huge nose tackle types. Patterson and Kuhn offer flexibility and can play the run. Moving forward past 2013, if the Giants can re-sign Joseph (a big if), then the Giants will be in good shape with him and Hankins. The real wild card is Austin. Is he a bust or can he become the player the Giants hoped he would when they drafted him in the second round of the 2011 NFL Draft?

Linebacker: Most Giants’ fans seemed to be more concerned with this position than any other. For quite some time, the Giants have rarely addressed this spot high in the draft (with the exception of Clint Sintim). The team has been more proactive in free agency with additions such as Michael Barrow, Antonio Pierce, and Michael Boley to name a few. The same pattern continued this offseason. The Giants did not draft a linebacker but added Dan Connor and Aaron Curry in free agency. They also re-signed Keith Rivers.

This position is the most unsettled on the team despite the fact there are only eight linebackers on the current roster and it is conceivable that the Giants could only carry six heading into the regular season. There is little stability right now. Not only is there no sure starter at any of the three spots, but five of the eight players will see their contracts expire after the 2013 season. Dan Connor is probably the favorite to start in the middle, but he could be challenged there by Aaron Curry or Mark Herzlich. Curry will also vie for one of the outside spots along with Rivers, Jacquian Williams, and Spencer Paysinger. Long shots include Jake Muasau who was with the Giants in camp last year and rookie free agent Etienne Sabino.

One wonders how much the Giants will actually use three linebackers on the field. Obviously, a three-linebacker set will be their base defense. And one would think that having more linebackers on the field would be a good thing against a run-centric team like the Washington Redskins. But Perry Fewell and many other defensive coordinators are using more nickel-type defenses in today’s passing league, and Fewell, in particular, favors the three-safety look.

Rivers has talent, but he can’t seem to stay healthy. Williams can run like a deer, but is he physical enough? Paysinger has been working like a dog this offseason to get his shot. But both he and Herzlich need to prove they are more than just special teams players. The real wild cards are Connor and Curry – two highly-touted collegiate prospects who have had their ups and downs in the NFL, each with two different teams.

Defensive Back: It’s not the linebacker position that worries me the most, but cornerback. This was the position I was more shocked the Giants did not address in the draft. On paper, the Giants look deep and talented with Corey Webster, Prince Amukamara, Terrell Thomas, Jayron Hosley, and Aaron Ross. But Webster and Ross are over 30 and obviously on the downside of their respective careers. Thomas is coming off his third ACL tear on the same knee. If Webster rebounds from a bad 2012, if Thomas’ knee holds up and his overall athleticism hasn’t suffered, and if Ross can serve as a steady backup, then the Giants should be in good shape. But those are all huge “ifs”. Things could get really ugly if the answers to those questions are negative. Moreover, the Giants need Prince Amukamara to build upon a decent 2012 with a better 2013. And they desperately need Jayron Hosley to improve; he struggled quite a bit as a nickel corner in 2012.

Is there any potential gem in the other unknown cornerback candidates? Terrence Frederick, Laron Scott, Trumaine McBride, Charles James, and Junior Mertile are all vying for a spot on the 53-man roster.

Safety is more settled, but the Giants will be without Kenny Phillips. It’s hard to envision Stevie Brown duplicating his 8-interception season again in 2013, but we shall see. Rolle is steady and athletic, but he does not make many plays on the football and his cap number may become untenable in 2014. Will Hill flashed a great deal of promise and the Giants drafted Cooper Taylor. Ryan Mundy is a veteran free agent addition, but he was often viewed as a liability in coverage in Pittsburgh. Tyler Sash has not demonstrated anything more than special teams ability and may be on the hot seat. Veteran David Cardwell and rookie free agents Alonzo Tweedy and John Stevenson are the long shots.

Summary: So there has been a great deal of change. But will these changes improve their dreadful defensive rankings? There is talent on the defensive line, but it has to stop living off its reputation. Everything seems to be in a state of flux at linebacker. Are there three quality starters in that group? In the secondary, much depends on the questions surrounding the cornerback spot. Can Webster rebound? Can Thomas come back healthy and strong? Will Amukamara prove to be worthy of a #1 pick?

And can Perry Fewell and his defensive staff successfully mold together all of these changing and evolving parts into a cohesive, aggressive, and physical defense?

The Giants’ 2013 season probably depends on it.