Dec 082014
 
Share Button
Markus Kuhn, New York Giants (December 7, 2014)

Markus Kuhn – © USA TODAY Sports Images

New York Giants 36 – Tennessee Titans 7

Game Overview

The New York Giants dominated one of the NFL’s worst teams (30th in both offense and defense) that was also missing key players, especially on the offensive line and wide receiver. So it’s important to take this win with a very big grain of salt. The win also practically ensures that the Giants will not receive a top-5 pick in the 2015 NFL Draft.

All that said, after seven straight losses and two months of losing football, it does feel good to see our team finally win a game.

Offensive Overview

The Giants had five first-half possessions and scored on four of them. In the first half, the Giants picked up 14 first downs, were 6-of-10 (60 percent on 3rd down), and accrued 258 total net yards. Interestingly, the Giants’ first half strategy was heavily oriented to the pass as New York passed 30 times in 42 plays (71 percent) and almost 88 percent of the yards gained came through the air (226).

The issue was New York had to settle for field goals on three of those drives with possessions ending at the 2, 1, and 18 yard lines. In other words, the Giants were 1-of-4 (25 percent) within the red zone in the first half. On the Giants’ 12 first-half rushing attempts, they only gained 32 first-half yards (2.7 yards per carry).

With a 23-0 lead, the defense dominating, and memories of last week’s pass-play disasters, it was understandable for the Giants to go more conservative in the second half, especially after QB Eli Manning’s boneheaded interception that was returned for a touchdown. In the second half, the Giants passed the ball 13 times (for 34 yards) and ran it 16 (for 113 yards). (This does not count Ryan Nassib’s two kneel downs for -3 yards).

Only two plays went for over 18 yards, but those two plays (the 50 yard reception by Odell Beckham and the 50-yard run by Andre Williams) accounted for 1/4 of New York’s offense.

Quarterback

One again, it was a tale of two halves for Eli Manning. Eli was very sharp in the first half, completing 20-of-29 passes for 226 yards and one touchdown. That said, he did miss on two passes late in the first half inside the red zone.

In the second half, Eli did not play well, completing 6-of-13 passes for 34 yards, and one terrible interception that was returned 23 yards for a touchdown. The interception was an incredibly stupid play by Manning as the Giants were leading 30-0 at that point, and the only way the Titans could possibly get back into the game was turnovers. Instead of trying to make something out of nothing by carelessly flinging the ball to a well-covered Larry Donnell to his left, Eli should have tried to run for the first down or just taken a slide. At worst, bring on Steve Weatherford and punt. Don’t give the Titans any hope. In addition to that single play, Manning just wasn’t as accurate in the second half despite a number of passes called in obvious running down situations.

Running Backs

The running game was much more productive in the second half than the first, as the Giants running backs rushed for 32 yards on 12 carries (2.7 yards per carry) in the first half and 104 yards on 15 carries (6.9 yards per carry) in the second half. Of course, those numbers are inflated by Williams’ 50-yard touchdown run on 3rd-and-1 in the 3rd quarter.

Williams (52 snaps) was the bell cow, accounting for 131 of New York’s 142 rushing yards (92 percent). He also caught three passes for 16 yards. The second offensive touchdown drive was all Williams and his blockers as he carried the ball three times for 59 yards and the score.

Rashad Jennings (14 snaps), who was battling an ankle injury, only ran the ball twice for five yards and had one catch on 3rd-and-long for 17 yards on a very well-executed screen pass. Orleans Darkwa (6 snaps) carried the ball once for no gain and had one incomplete pass thrown in his direction.

Henry Hynoski played 24 snaps and his lead blocking in the second half was a big factor in Williams’ productivity.

Wide Receivers

Odell Beckham (67 snaps) was targeted 15 times, catching 11 passes for 130 yards and a touchdown. The bulk of his productivity came in the first half again when he caught nine of those passes for 117 yards. Beckham also showed off his arm strength with a deep pass that covered about 65 yards in the air.

Beckham had an 18-yard catch on New York’s first drive that ended with a short field goal. His biggest impact came on New York’s next possession as all four plays involved passes to Beckham with the talented receiver catching a contested 50-yard deep ball, a short 7-yard reception, and two plays later, a 3rd-and-3 15-yard TD reception while he was being smacked by the safety. Beckham also caught two short third-down conversions on the second FG drive. On the negative side, Beckham was flagged with an unsportsmanlike penalty and he dropped what should have been a 45-yard touchdown pass in the 4th quarter.

The second most productive wideout was not Rueben Randle but Preston Parker (42 snaps) who caught all five passes thrown in his direction for 50 yards. Two of those catches came on the opening FG drive as Parker caught a 12 yarder on 2nd-and-6 and a 15 yarder on 3rd-and-4. On New York’s second FG drive, Parker had another key 13-yard catch on 3rd-and-4. He also had a 17-yard catch on the final first-half FG drive.

Rueben Randle (50 snaps) had one catch for nine yards. Kevin Ogletree (15 snaps) had three passes thrown in his direction, but did have a reception. Corey Washington played four snaps and was not targeted.

Tight Ends

Larry Donnell (49 snaps) caught 4-of-7 passes thrown in his direction for 28 yards. He dropped a pass 3rd-and-6 pass right in his hands that would have given the Giants a 1st-and-goal situation in the 4th quarter. Daniel Fells (32 snaps, one target) did not have a catch while Adrien Robinson (13 snaps) made a tough catch on a low throw on 3rd-and-1 that unfortunately did not pick up the first down.

I watched the blocking of the tight ends more closely on the opening drive. Robinson had a nice block on the game’s initial play. Fells failed to make his block later on a run by Williams that went nowhere. Donnell made a really nice block as an upback leading the back through the hole on another carry. Donnell’s man was the guy who hit Manning hard on the deep shot to Beckham in the 4th quarter.

Offensive Line

The same offensive line that played for the first 10 games of the season started in Tennessee with Justin Pugh back at right tackle. Against a defense that was 8th in the NFL in sack production, the Giants did not allow a sack although Eli Manning was officially hit five times, three times by DE Jurrell Casey.

The running attack continues to sputter though the Giants certainly had some second half success running the ball, most notably on the 50-yard touchdown run.

The two weak spots remain OC J.D. Walton and RG John Jerry. For example, on the only New York drive in the first half that did not result in points, Walton’s bad block on 1st-and-10 led to a 1-yard loss. On 2nd-and-11, Manning had to quickly unload the ball as Jerry’s man blew past him to hit Manning as he threw the ball. Jerry gave up another quick pressure in the second quarter.

J.D. Walton gets pushed back, disrupting running play

J.D. Walton gets pushed back, disrupting the running play…

...then John Jerry gets beat inside, causing rushed throw.

…then John Jerry gets beat inside, causing a rushed throw.

But there were other slip ups up front that hurt the running game. In the 2nd quarter, LT Will Beatty could not handle DE Jurrell Casey at the point-of-attack and Williams was tackled for a 3-yard loss.

RDE disrupts running play by defeating block of Will Beatty.

RDE disrupts running play by defeating block of Will Beatty.

On the positive side, there was superb blocking Williams’ 50-yard touchdown run by Beatty, tight ends Robinson and Fells, and fullback Hynoski.

50-yard TD with good blocks from Robinson, Beatty, Fells, and Hynoski.

50-yard TD with good blocks from Robinson, Beatty, Fells, and Hynoski.

And my whipping boys, Walton and Jerry did a really nice job on a 3rd-and-long screen pass that picked up 17 yards and set up the last field goal.

A well-executed screen with good downfield blocks by Walton and Jerry.

A well-executed screen with good downfield blocks by Walton and Jerry.

Beatty was flagged with a holding penalty and Richburg with ineligibly downfield on a screen pass.

Defensive Overview

The Giants dominated defensively, shutting out the Titans, holding them to 12 first downs (three in the first half). The Titans were held to a paltry 207 total yards (62 in the first half). The Giants accrued eight sacks, three turnovers, and scored defensively.

While such a performance should not be discounted against any pro team, keep in mind the Titans were 30th in offense and dead last in scoring coming into the game, and they were without both offensive tackles and their best wideouts due to injury.

Defensive Line

The Giants held the Titans to 61 yards rushing and 27 of those yards were from the quarterback. Indeed, backup quarterback Jake Locker was the team’s leading rusher. In addition, the Giants defensive line was credited with four sacks.

There are currently only three defensive ends on the roster. Jason Pierre-Paul (50 snaps, 7 tackles, 2 sacks, 2 tackles for losses, 1 QB hit, 1 forced fumble) and Damontre Moore (45 snaps, 2 tackles, 2 sacks, 2 tackles for losses, 2 QB hits) saw the bulk of the action though Kerry Wynn (35 snaps, no tackles) played quite a bit.

Tennessee was missing both their offensive tackles. JPP took advantage of that and was the most disruptive defensive player on the field. Interestingly, Perry Fewell finally had him playing quite a bit at left defensive end, though Pierre-Paul continued to flip-flop between both end spots. Not only did Pierre-Paul have two sacks but he was a factor on the pass rush throughout the contest. For example, JPP’s pressure caused the quarterback to step up into the pocket and into the waiting arms of Jameel McClain on the team’s first sack. Similarly, on the Devon Kennard sack the caused the fumble returned for a touchdown, it was JPP who initially contacted the quarterback.

Pierre-Paul had initial contact on fumble play returned for TD.

Pierre-Paul had initial contact on fumble play returned for TD.

Pierre-Paul’s first sack came late in the first half as he also stripped the ball. However, Pierre-Paul should have simply fallen on the fumble instead of trying to pick it up as Tennessee recovered instead. JPP’s second sack came on the Titans’ last offensive series.

JPP beats left tackle to sack QB and cause fumble.

JPP beats the left tackle to sack QB and cause a fumble.

Pierre-Paul was also a factor against the run, as best illustrated by his penetration on the second offensive snap of the 3rd quarter that disrupted one running play.

JPP blows up running play.

JPP blows up running play.

Like Pierre-Paul, Moore was flipped-flopped from side to side. He was not terribly stout at the point-of-attack against the run, particularly at left defensive end. I saw one late 1st quarter running play where he was easily shoved back four yards by the tight end. To me, since he doesn’t look bigger than Devon Kennard, Moore is probably better suited to the right side of the defense in non-obvious pass-rush situations.

Moore - playing LDE - gets pushed back 4 yards by TE

Moore – playing LDE – gets pushed back 4 yards by TE

Moore came up with his first sack late in the 3rd quarter. However, two plays later, Moore was flagged with an unnecessary roughness penalty, wiping our a defensive touchdown. Moore’s final sack came on the Giants’ last defensive play as Moore nailed the QB for a 10-yard loss on 4th-and-9.

At defensive tackle, as usual, Johnathan Hankins (27 snaps, 1 tackle, 1 QB hit) saw the most action but Jay Bromley (23 snaps, no tackles) was #2 in the number of snaps received. Hankins had one very good pass rush where he smacked the quarterback as he released the ball, causing an incomplete pass on a play where the receiver was wide open. He also was right on top of the quarterback on Moore’s sack that ended the game on 4th-and-9.

Hankins beats LG to hit QB, causing an incomplete pass.

Hankins beats LG to hit QB, causing an incomplete pass.

Mike Patterson (19 snaps, 1 tackle), Markus Kuhn (16 snaps, 2 tackles, 1 fumble recovery), and Cullen Jenkins (14 snaps, 1 tackle) all saw playing time too. Kuhn had the defensive score. Patterson made a nice hustle play down the line of scrimmage on the tight end on his sole tackle.

Linebackers

With Jacquian Williams and Mark Herzlich both out with concussions, the Giants were short at linebacker with only Jameel McClain, Devon Kennard, Spencer Paysinger, and newcomers James Davidson and Paul Hazel active.

McClain (58 snaps, 8 tackles, 1 sack, 2 tackles for losses, 1 QB hit) and Kennard (32 snaps, 6 tackles, 2 sacks, 2 tackles for losses, 2 QB hits, 1 forced fumble) were very active for the second game in a row. No other linebacker showed up on the stat sheet as Paysinger only played nine snaps.

McClain had the team’s first sack and Kennard followed that up later in the first quarter with a sack and forced fumble that was returned for a touchdown. McClain made a nice tackle on a 3-yard screen play that looked poised to pick up more. Kennard’s second sack – where he was unblocked – knocked the Titans’ starting quarterback out of the game.

Defensive Backs

Titans’ wideouts were limited to 12 catches for a total of 148 yards, but keep in mind that Tennessee’s two top wideouts were missing from this game and former Giant Derek Hagan was Tennessee’s leading receiver with six catches for 62 yards. The two Titans quarterbacks completed 23-of-35 passes for 206 yards, 0 touchdowns, and 2 interceptions (57.6 QB rating).

The only big breakdown came late in the game on a 30-yard completion where there appeared to be some confusion between safeties Antrel Rolle and Stevie Brown.

Zack Bowman (no defensive snaps) appears to have been demoted. Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie (58 snaps, 0 tackles, 1 interception, 1 pass defense) and Chykie Brown (56 snaps, 5 tackles) started with Mike Harris (50 snaps, 3 tackles, 1 sack, 2 tackles for losses, 1 QB hit) receiving significant playing time as the slot corner.

DRC played well and picked off a pass that he returned for a touchdown in the fourth quarter. A penalty wiped out the TD, but the interception stood. I thought he got a little sloppy with this tackling however.

I liked what I saw from Harris. He missed a sack in the first half when the QB ducked under his blitz, but later redeemed himself with a 10-yard sack on 4th-and-5 in the fourth quarter. Harris was often matched up on dangerous RB Dexter McCluster, and he did a nice job on him. Harris also nailed Hagan for a 2-yard loss on a WR-screen in the 4th quarter.

At safety, Stevie Brown (58 snaps, 2 tackles) continued to start along with Antrel Rolle (58 snaps, 4 tackles, 1 pass defense). Quintin Demps (26 snaps, 3 tackles, 1 interception, 1 pass defense) and Nat Berhe (3 snaps, 1 tackle) saw playing time as well.

On the play where Moore’s penalty wiped out a defensive score by DRC, Rolle was also flagged with unsportsmanlike conduct for pretending to take pictures of Rodgers-Cromartie…a stupid, immature stunt by a veteran of Rolle’s stature. Rolle did cause a late interception with his hit on TE Delanie Walker that was picked off by Demps on the rebound.

Chykie Brown seemed to do OK but was flagged with an unnecessary roughness penalty.

Special Teams

Josh Brown was 5-for-5 on field goal attempts, making it from 20, 19, 36, 52, and 42 yards. Five of his nine kickoffs went for touchbacks. The longest Tennessee kickoff return went for 23 yards.

Steve Weatherford punted four times, averaging 46.5 yards per punt (40.5 yard net). He nailed a 61 yarder that bounced into the end zone and only netted 41 yards – this is why Tom Quinn was upset on the sidelines. The Titans only returned one punt for four yards.

Preston Parker returned one kickoff for 20 yards but only reached the 17-yard line. Odell Beckham returned four punts for 49 yards, with the longest being for 21 yards. He seems poised to break one.

Paul Hazel was flagged for being offsides on a kickoff.

(New York Giants at Tennessee Titans, December 7, 2014)
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Eric Kennedy

Eric Kennedy is Editor-in-Chief of BigBlueInteractive.com, a publication of Big Blue Interactive, LLC. Follow @BigBlueInteract on Twitter.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.