Apr 192018
 
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Brandon Marshall, New York Giants (October 8, 2017)

Brandon Marshall – © USA TODAY Sports Images

NEW YORK GIANTS CUT BRANDON MARSHALL…
The New York Giants released wide receiver Brandon Marshall on Thursday after he failed his physical. Marshall was placed on Injured Reserve in October 2017 after suffering an ankle injury in Week 5 that required stabilization surgery to repair torn ligaments. Marshall finished his disappointing debut season with the Giants with only 18 catches for 154 yards (8.6 yards per catch).

Marshall was entering the final year on a 2-year, $11 million contract and was set to count $6,156,250 against the 2018 salary cap. By cutting him, the Giants “saved” $5,156,250 with $1 million lost in dead money. The Washington Post is reporting that Marshall had agreed to take a pay cut in March. No formal re-structuring had taken place however.

Marshall was originally drafted in the 4th round of the 2006 NFL Draft by the Denver Broncos. He has played with the Broncos (2006-2009), Miami Dolphins (2010-2011), Chicago Bears (2012-2014), and Jets (2015-2016). Marshall is a six-time Pro Bowler (2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2015) and two-time All-Pro (2012 and 2015). Marshall is the only player in NFL history with six seasons of 100 or more receptions. In 2016, he started 15 regular-season games despite battling knee and foot injuries that he suffered in Week 2. Marshall caught 59 passes for 788 yards and three touchdowns. Those numbers were down dramatically from his 109-catch, 1,502-yard, 14-touchdown 2015 season. The Giants signed Marshall in March 2017 after he was cut by the New York Jets.

DAVE GETTLEMAN’S 2018 PRE-DRAFT PRESS CONFERENCE…
New York Giants General Manager Dave Gettleman held the team’s annual pre-draft press conference on Thursday. The following is the transcript from the event (video is also available courtesy of Giants.com):

Opening Statement: Just before we begin, I’d like to thank Pat Shurmur, Chris Mara, Chris Pettit, Kevin Abrams, the scouts, the coaches and all of the support staff that we have that are just doing a terrific job helping us put the whole board together. Everybody has done a great job adjusting to the different philosophy and methodology. We have gotten meaningful dialogue and collaboration, we’ve watched a ton of film together and the ensuing dialogue is going to be very insightful and meaningful and my hat is off to all of them. They just did a great job and with that being said, let the games begin.

Q: You mentioned the different philosophies. Can you explain the changes that you brought in?

A: Well, the college football game is so different from ours it is not even close. It is a very, very different game and in the old days we would grade, you would have critical factors and you have position specifics. In the old days you had kids that were on scholarship, a lot of them were five-year guys, there was no such thing as the 20-hour rule and when those guys were coming out, all you had to do was put a little polish on them and you had a player. The guys that are coming out now and I’m not criticizing anybody, they’re not as fundamentally and technically as sound as those guys used to be. So, to grade them position specific and plus since the game has changed, the college game is different, it’s hard for us to really decipher what each player is being asked to do, it’s different. So, what I’ve tried to get everyone to understand is you have to grade the critical factors. You have to grade instincts, competitiveness, strength, explosion, athletic ability, and you’ve got to grade their play. I don’t care what a guy runs on the watch in his underwear, I don’t care. It’s how fast can he play on the field, how does he carry his pads, that’s what’s important, so with this 20-hour rule and everything, you can’t really knock it if we’re going to take a linebacker. You have to be careful if you knock his grade down because he doesn’t shed well. You don’t know what he’s being taught, you don’t know what he’s being told, you don’t know how much time is being spent on that skill and it is a skill, but that is a skill that can be coached, that’s something that we can improve, so that’s why I don’t grade on (?) I’m not as concerned much with the position specifics as I am with the critical factors, so that’s a different way of looking at it. And then just the whole methodology of setting the board up. I learned a really unique way of looking at it when I went to Carolina. I had never seen it before and when I looked at it — of course, I’m a little anxious because these guys got to understand that they are teaching me to a certain degree and they were very gentle (laughs). At the end of the day, it is a great way of looking at it and it really brings clarity to what you do and the other thing is the detail work, really knowing the player, digging deep – what kind of a guy is he? Is he trained? How important is football to him? I think in my opening presser I said I don’t want guys that like to play football, I want guys that hate to lose, that’s what I want. There isn’t anybody in this room that would say, who likes to win and everybody raise their hand, we have gone through this exercise before, it’s just the way it is. It’s that detail work that’s really important and everybody is getting it and it was really neat sitting around and watching film as a group. It’s great from looking at a guy that’s played in the Southeast Conference and it’s great for the scouts that didn’t get an opportunity to see them play. It’s vice versa as you’re looking at players around the country, so I thought it was a great exercise, it was a great teaching moment, we can all learn from each other and I thought that was very good. The scouts were excellent in terms of chiming in and telling me what they thought. I told them at our opening, the first time we all sat down, I said, ‘Listen, you’re getting paid for your opinion. You leave this room wishing you had said something but didn’t, shame on you because you’re not doing your job, you’re thinking about it.’ So it was great. We had a great time to prep, the scouts are home right now, we all got tired of looking at each other and it was time for them to see their families, so they’re home. They will be back Sunday night, we’ll take a good, hard look at the board again on Monday and Tuesday morning and then we’ll be ready to roll.

Q: How close are you to making a final decision at this point or how close are you at narrowing it down to a couple guys?

A: How close? You can’t close your mind. You can’t close your mind. You don’t know what is going to happen.

Q: Well it’s a little easier at No. 2 isn’t it?

A: Sure. Listen, we’ll know when we know. I’m not making any decisions before that.

Q: How important is this pick to the future of this franchise?

A: Well, when you’re picking this high, if you make a mistake, you’re done. We talk that when you miss on a quarterback, you really hurt the franchise for probably five years. It’s a five-year mistake. Yeah, it’s a big decision, but as long as you’ve done your homework and turned all the rocks over, you will come to the right answer. You ask the right questions and you will get the right answers.

Q: The last year or two it seemed like this quarterback class was very anticipated. Now that you have done all of your pre-draft homework, how do you think this group stacks up against other groups of quarterbacks in previous drafts?

A: It’s funny, it’s a really a neat group to evaluate because they are all different players. With the second pick, I’m sitting at Ben and Jerry’s and I’ve got a lot of flavors to look at and they’re all different. I can’t compare it to the ‘83 draft if that’s what you’re asking. The ‘83 draft you had (John) Elway, (Jim) Kelly, (Dan) Marino. C’mon Steve, help me. (Ken) O’Brien, (Tony) Eason at that time on my Patriots.

Q: What about 2004?

A: That was a heck of a group, too. Everything is different and, again, we’re in a different time with college football being just different. It’s funny, when I went to Carolina, at the opening presser they say, (?). I said listen, ‘At the end of the day, I don’t care what kind of quarterback you are, I don’t care who you play for, if you can’t make plays from the pocket, then you can’t win. You can’t win. You’ve got to be able to make plays from the pocket.’ So they take that and they run with it and I am going to trade Cam. The bottom line is all of these guys are interesting, they’re unique, there is depth there for sure and it’s a heck of a group to watch. It’s fun.

Q: When you talk about the quarterbacks in this class and the importance of the position, do you still apply your gold jacket standard?

A: I’m going to turn the question on you. My mother told me that it was never polite to answer a question with a question, but I’m going to do it anyway. If you think about all the quarterbacks that you’ve seen, who of them have made everybody better? That’s what you’re looking for. Does he make everybody around him better? That’s what you’re looking for.

Q: Is it naïve to think that the three days next week where you will see Davis Webb can change your board?

A: Nothing is going to totally change the top of the board. Seeing Davis next week is going to be fun for us because he’s a great kid, he works his fanny off, he has been following Eli (Manning) around like a little puppy dog since he walked in the door and it will be a neat opportunity to see him play. Yeah, sure, everything affects the board. I’d be lying if I said no, but at the end of the day, I’m looking forward to it.

Q: Do you like the fact that there are so many opinions about what you’re going to do at No. 2?

A: Like it? I love it. Are you kidding me? By the way, when you were on Sirius the other day, it was Saturday and I was in here holed up watching film, I was listening to you and it was hysterical what you were saying. I loved it. Yeah, I do.

Q: Was I correct?

A: Yeah, you were in the response that you made that Dave Gettleman doesn’t care about what the media says. It’s true.

Q: When people bring up smokescreens and information has leaked…

A: Let me tell you something – when I was a little kid, every time I lied, I got caught and when I was seven years old, my father kicked my butt and I haven’t lied since then. To me it’s silly, but that’s me.

Q: So who are you picking?

A: I’m taking you, Steve.

Q: That’s a five-year mistake.

A: (Laughs) What else have you got, kids?

Q: Is (Penn State RB) Saquon Barkley a generational talent?

A:  I’m not going to lie. He’s a tremendous talent. You put the film on of a defensive guy and if they’re playing Penn State, then I’m watching Saquon. He’s one of those guys that my mother could have scouted. She could have figured that one out.

Q: If a certain group is considered deep in the draft, do you stay away from that position due to the depth in the later rounds?

A: You’ve got to stay with the value. You have to stay with the value because you guys have heard a million stories, I’ve heard a million and one and you’ve probably heard half a million where a guy says, ‘Don’t worry, he’ll be there in the next round.’ Then the next round comes around and he ain’t there. You have to stay with your board, you have to stay with value. You can’t get too cute. Guys have kind of laughed around the league when we’d be on the clock in Carolina and I’d have my pick in in 28 seconds. If you know what you want, then go do it. Don’t be shy. If you get too cute, you’re going to lose. You’re going to come up on the wrong end and it’s about value. You can never have too many good players at one position.

Q: Along those lines how do you weigh the running back value in the NFL with the talent of a guy like Saquon also taking into account the value of the quarterback in the NFL?

A: I think that the devaluing of the running back is really a myth. If you have a great running back, he immediately makes your quarterback better, your offensive line better and your passing game. So I don’t believe in it. It’s how you evaluate the players, how we value them, how we rate them and then you go on from there.

Q: How much does shelf life come into consideration?

A: That’s dangerous. It’s dangerous to look at it that way. Anthony Munoz failed everybody’s physical and he only played 15 years and went to the Hall of Fame. Thurman Thomas had no ACL – I think he had a pretty long career. You make yourself crazy. You just can’t get into that. It’s the value, it’s the player – does he fit your scheme? If he fits your scheme and the value is there, pull the trigger and keep moving.

Q: What about the value of having the No. 2 pick helps you now as opposed to picking a quarterback helping the franchise in the future?

A: It’s a consideration. It’s a consideration. You think about stuff.

Q: How many good years do you think Eli Manning has left?

A: Well, you know we’ve talked about it. There is no ability to predict that. Eli takes great care of his body, he’s very fit. We watched the film and he still has plenty of arm. Who knows? Did anybody know that, I’m drawing a blank on his name; he played quarterback at the age of 45. Who knows? I know the Oakland kicker Blanda played a game late, right Steve? You played a game late and there was another quarterback, he played for Atlanta. But anyhow, like I said, Eli takes great care of himself, he’s very fit and he still has plenty of arm.

Q: How much does he factor into the equation of what you’re going to do at No. 2?

A: Everybody factors in. Your team factors into the equation, everybody does. Here is the deal – as the G.M., I walk a tight line. I have to look at the short term and I have to look at the long term and that’s the tight rope that I walk and I have to take all that into consideration in making decisions, whether it’s the draft, whether it’s unrestricted free agency, whether it’s trading for an Alec Ogletree. Whatever it is, making claims – you have to think about it. So I’m on that tight rope doing the best I can with the information that I have and we move forward.

Q: What do you say to the idea of picking at No. 2 means you have to take a quarterback?

A: I say hogwash. How is that?

Q: You never traded back in the five drafts in Carolina? Is that philosophical?

A: No, I never did, did I? It just kind of never happened, I guess. I traded up a bunch, I know that. It just kind of never happened. There was nothing ever meaningful enough that would keep me from a player that we had that was there for us to take. I guess that’s what it is. Like I said, you can outsmart yourself and you can have a player there that you like, but someone wants to trade and you go, ‘Alright, I can get extra draft picks.’ Woo and you get into that. Nobody ever offered us – you know what, in Carolina I never got a meaningful enough offer to trade back.

Q: Are you open to it if a meaningful enough offer came your way?

A: Sure. It depends on what’s on the board and who is still on the board. I’m open to it. Listen, you have to be open to everything. You have to listen. You can’t be afraid of conversation. You have to be open.

Q: Do you get more offers and calls because of your position?

A: We’ve had calls. I’ll admit to that.

Q: What do you think the likelihood is of you making a move?

A: I’m not going to put a percentage on that. If I had the answer to that, I wouldn’t be sitting here and I would be in Vegas.

Q: Are you adamant that you have to get a great player in this draft?

A: Sometimes you have to look at it this way and I’m not saying this is the way I always look at it, but sometimes you have to look at it this way – we’re all in school, do I want to get an A and four C’s or do we want an A-, a couple of B+’s and a couple of B’s? Winning requires depth. If you don’t have depth – I’ve seen teams that had great defenses that folded in the fourth quarter because they had no depth and now you’ve got guys on the field for 95-98 percent playing time. You can’t win that way, guys wear down, so there is obviously different ways of looking at it depending upon what the A looks like. But, if you get a chance to accumulate quality, you put yourself in a position to potentially accumulate picks and have a lot of very solid players, there is nothing wrong with that. There is nothing wrong with that.

Q: There is a report that you are releasing Brandon Marshall. Can you comment on that?

A: Really? Yes, we have.

Q: Why now?

A: We’re releasing him – failed physical.

Q: Does that mean that you guys have interest in Dez Bryant?

A: I have interest in everybody. We do our film work and you never know.

Q: Now that we’re closer to the draft, are you able to say for sure that Odell Beckham Jr. is not going to be traded?

A: I’m not going to say. He’s on our team, he’s a valued member of our football team.

Q: Is No. 2 too high to draft a lineman?

A: It was really funny, we did some background work and there has only been one interior guy taken with the second pick of the draft and it was in (1966) and it was (Tom Mack) of the Rams. Brandon Scherff was taken at No. 5. In the old days, people would shoot you in the head. You were considered brain dead and they’d drag you out by your toes. Is it ever too early to take a great player? You know my philosophy – big men allow you to compete and you have to build your lines. I’m going to build this team from the inside out. You look at the teams that go deep in the playoffs, you turn around and you take a look at how (Eagles General Manager) Howie (Roseman) has built Philly – both fronts, let’s go. Because again, those three truths don’t change, you’ve got to run the ball, you’ve got to defend the run and rush the passer. So, everyone else wants to talk about skill guys and I want to talk about hog mollies.

Q: You said that you’ve traded up a lot. Do you have enough assets to trade up in this draft and would you dip into future drafts to trade up?

A: I’m not going to do that. I’m going to tell you that right now. Right now, I have no intention of dipping into future drafts. None.

Q: Can you explain how you set up your draft board?

A: It’s a combination of vertical – by position, you set it up vertically and then once you’ve set your values on the players vertically, then you start working horizontally. So, let’s say that I’ve got Russ Salzberg at a 7.4 and I’ve got Art Stapleton at a 7.4 and I’ve got Paul Schwartz at a 7.4 and Russ is the running back, Art is the tackle and Paul is a pass rusher, I’ll give him something. What you’re going to do now is if they all have the same value, they’re all in the same conversation, so when the pick comes up and those three characters are all 7.4’s, you talk about what it is and if there is a need at one of those positions, then you take the need. If there is not a need, then you take the best guy, but that’s the conversation. We’re not talking about 25 guys, we’re talking about three guys. Does that make sense to you guys?

Q: I know you laid out the process. If you had to make the pick right now, in your mind and your heart, do you know who you want to take at No. 2?

A: No. I’m being honest.

Q: Is all the information that you got during the visits overkill?

A: It’s not overkill at all, it really isn’t because what is interesting is seeing a guy out of his own element because there is a little less comfort and you can’t know too much about a guy. Remember, you’re bringing him into your locker room, how is he going to handle that, do you want him in your locker room? Who is he coming here with? Is he living alone, does he know how to boil water? How is he going to handle New York City? It is all that stuff and we have to find that out because when you come into the National Football League and so many of these guys are 21, 20 years old when they get out there for the first time and there is some 28, 29 year-old man staring them in the face, they better be ready for that because it’s going to be a rude awakening, and if you don’t bring in the kinds of guys that you know are going to be able to stand up to that, then you’re making a mistake. The 30 visits are not overkill. The amount of contact that we have with these guys over the draft process, all star games, Indianapolis and then their Pro Days workouts and then the 30 guys we can bring in here, it’s very, very meaningful and it’s important.

Q: When you talk about the quarterbacks about being in Ben and Jerry’s and having a lot of different flavors, does that also translate to there is no one that has it all?

A: Not necessarily. They are four different, distinct personalities. But no, not necessarily.

Q: Do you know in your mind right now if you will take a quarterback?

A: Time will tell.

Q: By your own barometer of envisioning the player you take at No. 2 wearing a gold jacket some day, is there a chance that that player is out there, he can help you win now and it’s actually not that hard of a decision?

A: Yes.

Q: You took Christian McCaffrey at No. 8 last year and you described the pick as a no brainer. Could you argue at No. 2 that Saquon is a no brainer to help this team?

A: You could argue that either way.

Q: One of the things that you need from a player is that they have to love football. There are reports that Josh Rosen maybe lacks a desire to play the game. You met with him. What was your impression of him?

A: He wants to play football. He came off as bright, insightful and he wants to play football.

ARTICLES…

Dec 282017
 
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Dave Gettleman, Carolina Panthers (March 1, 2017)

Dave Gettleman – © USA TODAY Sports

NEW YORK GIANTS HIRE DAVE GETTLEMAN AS GENERAL MANAGER…
The New York Giants announced on Thursday that they have hired Dave Gettleman as the team’s general manager. Kevin Abrams had been serving as the Giants’ interim general manager since Jerry Reese was fired on December 4th.

The 66-year old Gettleman was the Giants’ pro personnel director (1999-2011) and senior pro personnel analyst (2012) before becoming the general manager of the Carolina Panthers (2013-2017). The Panthers fired Gettleman in July 2017.

The Giants only interviewed Gettleman and three other individuals for the position, including Giants’ Vice President of Player Evaluation Marc Ross, former Washington Redskins and Philadelphia Eagles Director of Pro Personnel Louis Riddick, and Abrams, who was the team’s assistant general manager before serving as interim GM. Gettleman was interviewed by team President/CEO John Mara, Chairman/Executive Vice President Steve Tisch, and former general manager Ernie Accorsi last Wednesday. Accorsi served as a consultant to Mara and Tisch during the selection process.

“Given where we are as a team, we thought it was important to bring in someone with experience as a general manager and a proven track record,” Mara and Tisch said in a written statement. “Dave’s experience is unparalleled. He did an outstanding job as general manager in Carolina, and he was vital to our success during his tenure here. Dave is going to bring his own approach to our organization in how we draft and acquire players through free agency.”

Gettleman will be introduced to the media on Friday at an 11:15AM news conference at Quest Diagnostics Training Center.

NEW YORK GIANTS INJURY REPORT…
Wide receiver Sterling Shepard (neck), wide receiver Tavarres King (concussion), tight end Evan Engram (rib), and defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul (finger/back) did not practice on Thursday.

Wide receiver Roger Lewis (ankle), offensive tackle Ereck Flowers (groin), offensive tackle Bobby Hart (ankle), and defensive end Avery Moss (hip) practiced on a limited basis.

THE COACHES SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following coaches are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

THE PLAYERS SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
The New York Giants practice on Friday at 10:55AM. Interim Head Coach Steve Spagnuolo and select players will address the media after practice.

Oct 162017
 
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Landon Collins and Jay Bromley, New York Giants (October 15, 2017)

Goal-Line Defense! – © USA TODAY Sports

NEW YORK GIANTS 23 – DENVER BRONCOS 10…
Missing a plethora of injured players, the underdog New York Giants soundly defeated the Denver Broncos 23-10 on Sunday night at Sports Authority Field at Mile High in Denver, Colorado. The victory was the team’s first on the season, as New York is now 1-5 overall.

Denver actually substantially out-gained the Giants in first downs (20 to 12), total net yards (412 to 266), and net passing yards (366 to 118). But the Giants out-rushed the Broncos 148 to 46 and the Giants won the all-important turnover battle 3 to 0. New York’s defense also forced two turnovers on downs. Coming into the game, Denver had been averaging 143 rushing yards per contest. And the Giants were able to move the ball on the ground against what had been the NFL’s #1 defense.

It was announced before the game that Offensive Coordinator Mike Sullivan would be taking over play-calling duties from Head Coach Ben McAdoo. The Giants also reconfigured their offensive line as follows: left tackle Ereck Flowers, left guard John Jerry, center Brett Jones, right guard D.J. Fluker, and right tackle Justin Pugh.

After the Giants’ defense forced a three-and-out to start the game, New York set the tone with a 7-minute, 13-play, 69-yard drive that ended with a 25-yard field goal by place kicker Aldrick Rosas. Both teams then exchanged three-and-outs. Denver had a chance to tie the game on their third possession, but missed a 35-yard field after a 6-play, 41-yard drive. Sparked by a 15-yard catch by wide receiver Roger Lewis on 3rd-and-10 and 47-yard run by running back Orleans Darkwa, the Giants went up 10-0 early in the second quarter on a 5-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Eli Manning to tight end Evan Engram on 3rd-and-2.

The Broncos responded with a drive into New York territory, but safety Landon Collins picked off quarterback Trevor Siemian’s pass at the 14 yard line and returned it 21 yards. After a three-and-out by the Giants, Denver managed their first scoring drive with a 9-play, 70-yard possession that resulted in a 28-yard field goal. Giants 10 – Broncos 3.

The Giants went three-and-out again and Denver got the ball back with 2:32 left before halftime. But on 3rd-and-10 from the Denver 38-yard line, Siemian’s pass was intercepted by cornerback Janoris Jenkins and returned 43 yards for a touchdown to give the Giants a 17-3 halftime advantage.

After both teams exchanged punts to start the third quarter, the Giants expanded their lead to 20-3 with Rosas’ 51-yard field goal after the offense gained 30 yards on six plays. Denver’s attempt to cut into this lead on their ensuing possession failed when their 53-yard field goal was blocked by defensive end Kerry Wynn. The Broncos immediately reciprocated as Rosas’ 49-yard field goal was partially blocked.

Still trailing 20-3, a desperate Broncos team went for it on 4th-and-5 at the start of the 4th quarter. The Broncos completed the pass for six yards and the first down, but Jenkins forced a fumble on the play that was recovered by fellow cornerback Eli Apple at the Giants’ 39-yard line. The Giants then went three-and-out for the fourth time in the game. Denver seriously threatened with an 11-play, 84-yard drive. But on 4th-and-goal from the NYG 1-yard line, defensive end Avery Moss stopped the running back for no gain with 8:23 to go in the game.

After a 15-yard run by Darkwa, the Giants were forced to punt again with just over six minutes to play. Unfortunately, the defense too quickly allowed Denver to score their lone touchdown of the night, moving 58 yards in seven plays and two minutes. The Giants recovered the onside kick at the Denver 41-yard line with four minutes to go. On 3rd-and-9, Darkwa gained 19 yards – enough to set up Rosas for a 40-yard field goal with half a minute to go for the final points of the game.

Offensively, Manning only completed 11-of-19 passes for 128 yards, 1 touchdown, and 0 interceptions. His leading receiver was Engram, who caught 5 passes for 82 yards and a touchdown. Darkwa rushed 21 times for 117 yards.

Defensively, Jenkins scored on his interception and also forced a fumble that was recovered by Apple (who also was credited with three pass defenses). Collins also had a pick. Defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul led the team with 8 tackles, three tackles for losses, and three sacks. Defensive tackle Damon Harrison also had a sack. The Giants were credited overall with 11 pass defenses.

Video highlights/lowlights are available at Giants.com.

INACTIVE LIST AND INJURY REPORT…
Inactive for the game were running back Paul Perkins (ribs), wide receiver Sterling Shepard (ankle), center Weston Richburg (concussion), defensive end Olivier Vernon (ankle), defensive end Romeo Okwara (knee), linebacker Jonathan Casillas (neck), and quarterback Davis Webb.

Linebacker Calvin Munson (quad) left the game and did not return.

POST-GAME REACTION…
Video clips of post-game media sessions with Head Coach Ben McAdoo and the following players are available at Giants.com:

  • Head Coach Ben McAdoo (Video)
  • QB Eli Manning (Video)
  • TE Evan Engram (Video)

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
Head Coach Ben McAdoo will address the media by conference call Monday afternoon.

Oct 102017
 
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Brandon Marshall, New York Giants (October 8, 2017)

Brandon Marshall – © USA TODAY Sports Images

BRANDON MARSHALL PLACED ON INJURED RESERVE…
A day after the New York Giants placed wide receivers Odell Beckham, Jr. (fractured ankle) and Dwayne Harris (fractured foot) on Injured Reserve, the team also placed wide receiver Brandon Marshall on IR with an ankle injury. All three were injured during the team’s 27-22 loss to the San Diego Chargers on Sunday and it is anticipated that all three will be out the remainder of the 2017 NFL season.

The Giants announced that Beckham had surgery on his left ankle on Monday night. Harris (5th metatarsal) and Marshall (ankle stabilization to repair torn ligaments) had surgeries performed on Wednesday.

To fill Marshall’s roster spot, the Giants signed wide receiver Ed Eagan from the team’s Practice Squad. The 5’11’, 183-pound Eagan was originally signed by the Dallas Cowboys as an undrafted rookie free agent after the 2016 NFL Draft. He has spent time with the Cowboys, Cleveland Browns, and Buffalo Bills. The Giants signed Eagan in August 2017.

The Giants also signed wide receiver Kalif Raymond and offensive guard Ethan Cooper to the Practice Squad. The Giants terminated the practice squad contract of center Anthony Fabiano, who was signed last week.

The 5’9, 160-pound Raymond was originally signed by the Denver Broncos after the 2016 NFL Draft. He has spent time with both the Broncos (2016) and New York Jets (2017). Raymond has played in six NFL games. The diminutive Raymond has not caught a pass, but he has returned nine kickoffs (24.7 yards per return) and 16 punts (9.3 yards per return).

The 6’2, 322-pound Cooper was originally signed by the Pittsburgh Steelers as an undrafted rookie free agent after the 2017 NFL Draft. The Steelers waived Cooper in early September. Cooper played at a lower level of competition in college but he has good size and is a decent athlete.

BRANDEN ALBERT VISITING THE GIANTS?…
NFL.com is reporting that left tackle Branden Albert will visit the New York Giants this week after meeting with the Seattle Seahawks and leaving without a deal. The 32-year old Albert was originally drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs in the 1st round of the 2008 NFL Draft. He has played with the Chiefs (2008-2013) and Miami Dolphins (2014-2016). In March 2017, Albert was traded to the Jacksonville Jaguars. He announced his retirement in July, returned to the team, and was then cut in August. The 6’5, 315-pound Albert is a two-time Pro Bowler (2013 and 2015). However, Albert is clearly in the twilight of his career and has not played a full regular-season schedule since 2011.

THE PLAYERS SPEAK…
Transcripts of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum:

NOTES…
The 0-5 Giants have trailed at halftime in each of their five games this season. This season, the Giants and their opponents have each scored 56 second-half points. But the Giants have been outscored in the first half, 66-26.

The Giants have led in the fourth quarter in each of their last three games.

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
The Giants return to practice on Wednesday at 11:40AM.

Oct 042017
 
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Giants fans tailgating in Tampa – Photo courtesy of Jim in South Florida

INJURY UPDATE…
Center Weston Richburg (concussion), defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul (shoulder/knee), defensive end Olivier Vernon (ankle), and cornerback Janoris Jenkins (ankle) did not practice on Wednesday.

Running back Paul Perkins (ribs), running back Orleans Darkwa (back), wide receiver Odell Beckham (finger/ankle), and wide receiver Brandon Marshall (toe) practiced on a limited basis.

ROSTER MOVES…
The New York Giants have waived linebacker Deontae Skinner and signed offensive lineman Jon Halapio off of the team’s Practice Squad. The Giants also signed center Anthony Fabiano to the Practice Squad.

Skinner was originally signed as an undrafted rookie free agent by the New England Patriots after the 2014 NFL Draft. He has spent time with the Patriots (2014-2015) and Eagles (2015-2016). The Giants added to and released Skinner from the Practice Squad multiple times in 2016. He also was signed to the 53-man roster in October and again in December. Skinner was cut by the Giants in September 2017 and re-signed later that month.

Halapio was originally drafted in the 6th round of the 2014 NFL Draft by the New England Patriots. He has bounced around different leagues and teams including the Patriots (2014), Boston Brawlers (2014), Denver Broncos (2014–2015), Arizona Cardinals (2015), Brooklyn Bolts (2015), and Patriots (2016) again. The Giants added him to their Practice Squad in September 2016 and again in September 2017. Halapio has not played in an NFL regular-season game.

Fabiano was originally signed as a rookie free agent by the Baltimore Ravens after the 2016 NFL Draft. He has spent time with the Ravens (2016), Cleveland Browns (2016), and Washington Redskins (2017). The 6’1”, 303-pound Fabiano played in four games with one start for Cleveland in 2016. Fabiano is an athletic lineman who lacks ideal size and strength.

HEAD COACH BEN MCADOO…
The transcript of Ben McAdoo’s press conference on Wednesday is available in The Corner Forum while the video is available at Giants.com.

THE PLAYERS SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
The Giants practice on Thursday at 11:20AM. The team’s coordinators and select players will also address the media after practice.

Oct 032017
 
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Eli Manning, New York Giants (October 1, 2017)

Eli Manning – © USA TODAY Sports

THE PLAYERS SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

NOTES…
Running back Wayne Gallman is the 78th different player to catch a regular-season pass from Manning. Gallman and tight end Rhett Ellison became the 47th and 48th players to catch a regular-season touchdown pass from Manning.

Wide receiver Odell Beckham, Jr.’s seven receptions in Tampa increased his career total to 308. That moved him past Victor Cruz (303) and into 10th place on the franchise’s career list. Hakeem Nicks is ninth with 318 catches.

According to the Elias Sports Bureau, this is the first time the Giants have lost consecutive games on the last play of the game since the 1970 merger.

The Giants and Buffalo Bills are the only NFL teams that have not scored a first-quarter point this season. The Giants’ 17 first-half points is the second-lowest total in the league; Miami has scored three.

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
The Giants return to practice on Wednesday at 11:40AM.

Oct 012017
 
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Nick Folk, Tampa Bay Buccaneers (October 1, 2017)

Giants lose at the buzzer again – © USA TODAY Sports

TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS 25 – NEW YORK GIANTS 23…
The losing continues for the New York Giants as the team fell to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sunday at Raymond James Stadium. For the second week in a row, the Giants blew two 4th-quarter leads and lost the game on a walk-off field goal. The Giants are still win-less on the season with an 0-4 record.

New York went three-and-out on its first two possessions of the game. Tampa Bay took a 7-0 lead after driving 56 yards in four plays, culminating with a 6-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Jameis Winston to wide receiver Mike Evans. The Giants responded by driving to the Bucs’ 30-yard line, but an incomplete pass on 4th-and-4 resulted in a turnover on downs. Two plays later, tight end O.J. Howard scored on a 58-yard reception to make the game 13-0 (the extra point was missed).

The Giants punted the ball away on both of their next two possessions. The Buccaneers punted once and missed a 46-yard field goal. New York finally got on the board in the second quarter with a 30-yard field goal by place kicker Aldrick Rosas after an 11-play, 52-yard drive. Tampa Bay went three-and-out and the Giants cut into their lead again when quarterback Eli Manning ran for a 14-yard touchdown, closing out a 7-play, 62-yard drive. But the Bucs added to their advantage late in the first half by driving 73 yards in 12 plays to set up a 20-yard field goal. It could have been worse as the defense held after facing 1st-and-goal from the 1-yard line. At the half, Tampa led 16-10.

The Buccaneers missed a 49-yard field goal on their initial possession of the second half. The Giants then took the lead on their initial possession by driving 61 yards in 11 plays. Rookie running back Wayne Gallman scored on a 4-yard pass from Manning. Giants 17 – Bucs 16.

Tampa Bay went three-and-out and the Giants had a chance to extend their lead but Rosas missed a 43-yard field goal early in the 4th quarter. The Bucs turned the ball over on downs on 4th-and-2 from the Giants’ 35-yard line with safety Landon Collins breaking up the pass. The Giants could not move the ball and punted. Worse, reminiscent of last week’s lost against the Eagles, Brad Wing shanked punt only traveled 15 yards. It only took Tampa Bay four plays to drive 57 yards with Winston throwing a touchdown pass from 14 yards out. The Buccaneers now led 22-17 (the 2-point conversion failed) with less than eight minutes to play.

To New York’s credit, the offense responded with an impressive 10-play, 75-yard drive that ended with a 2-yard touchdown pass to tight end Rhett Ellison on 3rd-and-goal. The big play on the drive was a 42-yard strike to wide receiver Odell Beckham. Unfortunately, the 2-point conversion failed and the Giants only led 23-22 with 3:16 left to play.

The defense could not hold the lead. Tampa Bay gained 59 yards in nine plays with a crucial 26-yard pass on 3rd-and-1. Place kicker Nick Folk – who missed an extra point and two field goals in the game – then nailed the 34-yard field goal to win the game with no time on the clock.

Manning finished the game 30-of-49 for 288 yards, two touchdowns passing, one running, and no interceptions. His leading receivers were Beckham (7 catches for 90 yards) and tight end Evan Engram (6 catches for 62 yards). Gallman was the leading rusher with 11 carries for 42 yards. Manning was not sacked in the game.

Defensively, the Giants did not force a turnover and only accrued one sack.

The Giants had no return yardage. Rosas missed a field goal and Wing shanked a punt.

Video highlights/lowlights are available at Giants.com.

INACTIVE LIST AND INJURY REPORT…
Inactive for the game were RB Orleans Darkwa (back), RT Bobby Hart (ankle), QB Davis Webb, TE Matt LaCosse, DE Avery Moss, LB Deontae Skinner, and CB Michael Hunter.

RB Paul Perkins (ribs), OC Weston Richburg (concussion), and DE Olivier Vernon (ankle) left the game with injuries and did not return.

WR Odell Beckham (finger) and DT Damon Harrison (bruised knee) were injured but later returned to the game.

POST-GAME REACTION…
Video clips of post-game media sessions with Head Coach Ben McAdoo and the following players are available at Giants.com:

  • Head Coach Ben McAdoo (Video)
  • QB Eli Manning (Video)
  • RB Wayne Gallman (Video)
  • WR Odell Beckham, Jr. (Video)
  • WR Brandon Marshall (Video)
  • S Landon Collins (Video)

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
Head Coach Ben McAdoo will address the media by conference call Monday afternoon.

Sep 262017
 
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Jay Bromley, New York Giants (September 24, 2017)

Jay Bromley – © USA TODAY Sports

THE PLAYERS SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
The Giants return to practice on Wednesday at 11:40AM.

Sep 242017
 
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Jake Elliott, Philadelphia Eagles (September 24, 2017)

Eagles win on a 61-yard walk-off field goal – © USA TODAY Sports

PHILADELPHIA EAGLES 27 – NEW YORK GIANTS 24…
In all likelihood, the 2017 New York Giants season ended on Sunday afternoon with the team’s devastating 27-24 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles. Trailing 14-0 entering the 4th quarter, the Giants scored 24 points in the final period, only to lose the lead twice. The Eagles won the game on a walk-off 61-yard field goal after a series of late-game Giants’ blunders. The Giants are now 0-3 overall and 0-2 in the NFC East.

The Giants’ offense continued to be inept in the first half. Their four offensive possessions resulted in two punts, an interception, and a turnover on downs at the Eagles’ 1-yard line just before halftime. The Eagles also had their own first-half offensive issues with two punts and a turnover on downs. But the team did put together an 18-play, 90-yard marathon of a drive that ended with a 1-yard touchdown run. At the half, the Giants trailed 7-0.

The 3rd quarter was not kind to New York either. Despite missing a 52-yard field goal, the Eagles extended their lead to 14-0 with a 7-play, 54-yard drive after another Manning interception. The Giants also had a three-and-out and another drive end on downs at the Eagles 13-yard line.

The game rapidly changed in the 4th quarter. The Giants scored their first touchdown on a 5-play, 55-yard drive that ended with a Manning 10-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver Odell Beckham, Jr. The Giants then immediately got the ball back when safety Landon Collins forced a fumble that was recovered by cornerback Eli Apple at the Eagles’ 33-yard line. Four plays later, Manning found Beckham again, this time with a one-handed 4-yard touchdown reception, and the game was tied at 14-14 with less than 11 minutes left to play.

After an Eagles punt, the Giants unbelievably went ahead 21-14 in the contest on a 77-yard catch-and-run by wide receiver Sterling Shepard. But the New York defense could not hold the lead as the Eagles quickly scored on a 4-play, 75-yard drive that tied the game with less than six minutes to play.

Back came the Giants with a 7-play, 52-yard drive that set up a successful 41-yard field goal by Aldrick Rosas. Giants 24 – Eagles 21. But again, the defense could not hold the lead and the Eagles tied the game on a 46-yard field goal after an 8-play, 47-yard drive.

The Giants got the ball back with 51 seconds left in regulation. After gaining seven yards on the first play, the Giants shot themselves in the foot with back-to-back penalties. Facing a 2nd-and-18 with 32 seconds to play, running back Shane Vereen stopped the clock by running out of bounds after a 3-yard run. Tight end Evan Engram came up 1-yard short of the first down after a 14-yard catch. On 4th-and-1 from the Giants’ 24, Brad Wing shanked a 28-yard punt to the Eagles’ 38-yard line. After an incomplete pass, a 19-yard pass with one second left on the clock moved the ball to the Giants’ 43-yard line. The Eagles punter then hit a 61-yard field goal to end the game.

Offensively, Manning finished the game 35-of-47 for 366 yards, three touchdowns, and two interceptions. His leading receivers were Beckham (9 catches, 79 yards, 2 touchdowns), wide receiver Brandon Marshall (8 catches for 66 yards), and Shepard (7 catches for 133 yards, 1 touchdown). However, the Giants continued to struggle running the ball, gaining just 48 yards on 17 carries.

Defensively, the Giants did force one turnover and accrued three sacks, but the defense yielded 354 total net yards, including 193 yards rushing.

The Giants were penalized 10 times for 137 yards in the game. The Eagles out-gained the Giants in time of possession 37:32 to 22:28.

Video highlights/lowlights are available at Giants.com.

INACTIVE LIST AND INJURY REPORT…
Inactive for the game were right tackle Bobby Hart (ankle), linebacker B.J. Goodson (shin), linebacker J.T. Thomas (groin), quarterback Davis Webb, running back Wayne Gallman, tight end Matt LaCosse, and defensive end Avery Moss.

Defensive end Olivier Vernon (ankle) and running back Orleans Darkwa (back) left the game with injuries and did not return. Vernon said after the game that x-rays on his ankle were negative but he would undergo an MRI.

POST-GAME REACTION…
Video clips of post-game media sessions with Head Coach Ben McAdoo and the following players are available at Giants.com:

  • Head Coach Ben McAdoo (Video)
  • QB Eli Manning (Video)
  • WR Odell Beckham, Jr. (Video)
  • WR Brandon Marshall (Video)
  • WR Sterling Shepard (Video)
  • DE Jason Pierre-Paul (Video)
  • CB Janoris Jenkins (Video)

ARTICLES…

Sep 212017
 
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Mike Sullivan and Eli Manning, New York Giants (September 18, 2017)

Mike Sullivan and Eli Manning – © USA TODAY Sports

INJURY UPDATE…
Right tackle Bobby Hart (ankle), linebacker B.J. Goodson (shin), linebacker J.T. Thomas (groin), and cornerback Janoris Jenkins (ankle) did not practice on Thursday.

Wide receiver Odell Beckham, Jr. (ankle) and tight end Evan Engram (concussion) practiced on a limited basis.

Linebacker Keenan Robinson (concussion) fully practiced. “I feel good,” Robinson said. “I’ve been on the sideline for like five weeks, four weeks, something like that. It feels good.”

THE COORDINATORS SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following coaches are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

THE PLAYERS SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
Head Coach Ben McAdoo and select position coaches and players will address the media on Friday. There is no media availability on Saturday. The Giants play the Eagles in Philadelphia on Sunday afternoon.