Jan 222020
 
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Eli Manning – © USA TODAY Sports

Quarterback Eli Manning has decided to end his NFL career and retire as a New York Giant. Manning will announce his retirement at a news conference at Quest Diagnostics Training Center in East Rutherford, New Jersey at 11:00AM on Friday. Thus ends a historic, 16-year NFL career spent entirely on the playing field with one team.

Through his first eight pro seasons, Manning accrued a 69-50 regular-season record and an 8-3 playoff record with two Super Bowl MVP trophies. He is the only Giants player to win the award twice and is one of just five players in NFL history to win multiple Super Bowl MVP awards. Manning is also one of 12 quarterbacks to win at least two Super Bowls. In his last eight seasons, Manning was 48-67 in the regular season and 0-1 in the playoffs. Ironically, he finished with an even 117-117 regular-season record and played in only one playoff game in the second-half of his entire career.

The 2019 season will be remembered as a sad farewell to arguably the best quarterback who ever played for the team. Manning was benched after Week 2. He started two more games in December when Daniel Jones got hurt and finished 2019 with a 1-3 record, completing 61.9 percent of his passes for 1,042 yards, 6 touchdowns, and 5 interceptions. A sparse crowd at MetLife Stadium in December gave him a standing ovation in his final game, a win that evened his overall career regular-season record.

Manning was the first player selected in the 2004 NFL Draft and immediately traded to the Giants by the San Diego Chargers. Manning owns practically every quarterback record in franchise history. He is the only player in franchise history to suit up for 16 seasons and his 236 regular-season games (234 starts) and 248 total games are both Giants records. From November 21, 2004 through November 23, 2017, Manning started 210 consecutive regular-season games, then the second-longest streak by a quarterback in NFL history. After being benched for one game by then Head Coach Ben McAdoo, Manning started the next 22 in a row, giving him 232 starts in 233 games. Manning never missed a game because of injury.

Manning is sixth in NFL history with 8,119 attempts and seventh with 4,895 completions, 57,023 yards, and 366 touchdown passes. He also has the franchise’s highest career completion percentage (60.29). Manning set Giants career playoff records with 400 passes, 242 completions, 2,815 yards, and 18 touchdown passes.

Manning was voted to the Pro Bowl in 2008 and 2011, and played in the game after the 2012 and 2015 regular seasons as an alternate. In 2016, Manning was the co-recipient of the Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year Award. He is the only Giants player to be so honored in the award’s 49-year history.

“For 16 seasons, Eli Manning defined what it is to be a New York Giant both on and off the field,” said team President and Chief Executive Officer John Mara. “Eli is our only two-time Super Bowl MVP and one of the very best players in our franchise’s history. He represented our franchise as a consummate professional with dignity and accountability. It meant something to Eli to be the Giants quarterback, and it meant even more to us. We are beyond grateful for his contributions to our organization and look forward to celebrating his induction into the Giants Ring of Honor in the near future.”

“We are proud to have called Eli Manning our quarterback for so many years,” said team Chairman and Executive Vice President Steve Tisch. “Eli was driven to always do what was best for the team. Eli leaves a timeless legacy with two Super Bowl titles on the field and his philanthropic work off the field, which has inspired and impacted so many people. We are sincerely thankful for everything Eli has given our team and community. He will always be a Giant among Giants.”

“I learned very early that you evaluate quarterbacks on their ability to win championships, and to do it late in a game when the game is on the line, that they’re able to take a team down the field and into the end zone to win a title,” said former team General Manager Ernie Accorsi, who traded for Manning. “The second thing is to know that over a period of years, he’s always going to be there. Those kinds of quarterbacks always give you a chance to win, and for 16 years, he did that for this franchise. He won championships and he was always there giving us a chance to win. I don’t know how you can ask more from a quarterback.”

“It was an honor and privilege to coach Eli, and to go through the wonderful and magnificent moments that he and his teammates provided for all of us in the world championship ‘07-‘08 and ’11-’12 seasons,” said Tom Coughlin, who served as Manning’s head coach from 2004 to 2015. “The New York Giants, flagship franchise of the National Football League, have four world championships You have four trophies sitting there. You have (Phil) Simms, you have (Jeff) Hostetler, and you have Eli for two. Eli Manning not only is the quarterback on those great teams, but he is the MVP of the Super Bowls. He’s an incredible big-game performer. You talk about a guy that’s great to coach, focused every day, took tremendous pride in preparing, practice, had a great sense of humor, was a cynic in the locker room. But the guys loved him and they loved him for it, and they played for him. The guys that had the opportunity to play with him know what it’s like to be with a guy with as much talent, as much grit, as much determination.

“Here goes the retirement of a great, great football Giant. I and my coaching staff and our teams from 2004 right through 2015, for me at least, my part, hold Eli in the highest respect and congratulate him and his family, and his mom and dad, for all of the wonderful, wonderful experiences he’s had, and the happiness and pride that he has brought to the entire Giants family, the fanfare, the fans, the family and everyone that’s taken so much pride from his performances and for what he’s meant. He’s always been there to make the call, to stand up and represent the Giants in the best possible way.

“I can’t tell you what that means to a coach, to be able to prepare every week knowing your starter is going to be there. It’s almost impossible today to be able to do that. Some teams are fortunate. Many teams it doesn’t happen to. You get a guy nicked, you get him hurt. I remember once he was hurt with a shoulder. He didn’t practice all week. We didn’t know if he’d be alright. He started and played the whole game and played well. It meant a great deal to us to be able to prepare knowing he was going to be on the field and be the starting quarterback for all of those games.”

Off of the field, Manning has been one of the most giving Giants, donating his time and money to numerous civic and charitable causes. He heads the Tackle Kids Cancer Initiative at Hackensack UMC and he launched “Eli’s Challenge” by pledging to match grassroots donations from local organizations dollar-for-dollar up to $100,000. He and his family built “The Eli Manning Children’s Clinics” at the Blair E. Batson Hospital for Children in Jackson, Mississippi. Manning supports numerous other charities, including Children’s of Mississippi Capital Campaign, March of Dimes, New York March for Babies, Guiding Eyes for the Blind, American Red Cross, Scholastic’s Classroom Care Program, and the PeyBack Foundation.

“That’s what it’s all about – it’s about giving back,” Coughlin said. “You think that the good Lord gave you these tools for you to hold inside you and be selfish about it? No chance. He goes out in the community, he’s himself when he’s out there. He’s done a tremendous amount of work for the Jay Fund (Coughlin’s charity foundation, which benefits the families of children with cancer). He goes to see cancer kids over in Hackensack and throughout New York City. His heart is in the right place.”

Next week in Hollywood, Florida, Manning will be presented with the 2020 Athletes in Action/Bart Starr Award. The award, bearing the name of Pro Football Hall of Famer Bart Starr, honors Starr’s lifelong commitment to serving as a positive role model to his family, teammates, and community.

Jan 212020
 
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Bret Bielema, New England Patriots (November 3, 2019)

Bret Bielema – © USA TODAY Sports

REPORT – GIANTS HIRE JEROME HENDERSON AS DEFENSIVE BACKS COACH…
ESPN is reporting that the New York Giants have hired former Atlanta Falcons Defensive Passing Game Coordinator Jerome Henderson as the team’s new defensive backs coach.

  • 2016-2019: Defensive Passing Game Coordinator, Atlanta Falcons
  • 2012-2015: Defensive Backs Coach, Dallas Cowboys
  • 2009-2011: Defensive Backs Coach, Cleveland Browns
  • 2008: Defensive Backs Coach, New York Jets
  • 2007: Assistant Defensive Backs Coach/Director of Player Development, New York Jets
  • 2006: Director of Player Development, New York Jets
  • Pro Experience: Cornerback, New England Patriots (1991-1993), Buffalo Bills (1993-1994), Philadelphia Eagles (1995), New England Patriots (1996), New York Jets (1997-1998)
  • Collegiate Experience: Cornerback, Clemson University (1987-1990)
  • Born: August 8, 1969

REPORT – GIANTS HIRE BRET BIELEMA IN UNSPECIFIED CAPACITY…
The NFL Network is reporting that the New York Giants have hired New England Patriots Defensive Line Coach Bret Bielema in a publicly unspecified role.

  • 2019: Defensive Line Coach, New England Patriots
  • 2018: Consultant to the Head Coach, New England Patriots
  • 2013-2017: Head Coach, University of Arkansas
  • 2006-2012: Head Coach, University of Wisconsin
  • 2004-2005: Defensive Coordinator, University of Wisconsin
  • 1996-2001: Linebackers Coach, University of Iowa
  • 1994-1995: Graduate Assistant, University of Iowa
  • 2002-2003: Co-Defensive Coordinator, Kansas State University
  • Pro Experience: Milwaukee Mustangs (1994)
  • Collegiate Experience: Defensive Lineman, University of Iowa (1989-1992)
  • Born: January 13, 1970

REPORT – GIANTS WILL RETAIN ANTHONY BLEVINS…
ESPN is reporting that the New York Giants will retain Assistant Special Teams Coach Anthony Blevins in a publicly unspecified role.

  • 2018-Present: Assistant Special Teams Coach, New York Giants
  • 2013-2017: Coaching Assistant/Special Teams, Arizona Cardinals
  • 2012: Cornerbacks Coach, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • 2011: Special Teams Coach/Cornerbacks Coach, Tennessee State University
  • 2009-2010: Cornerbacks Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, Tennessee State University
  • 2008: Cornerbacks Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, University of Tennessee-Martin
  • 2005-2007: Graduate Assistant, Mississippi State University
  • 2003-2004: Defensive Backs/Running Backs Coach, Meadow Creek High School (Georgia)
  • Pro Experience: Defensive Back, Mobile Admirals (1999), Birmingham Steeldogs (2000), Birmingham Thunderbolts (2001)
  • Collegiate Experience: Cornerback, University of Alabama at Birmingham (1994-1998)
  • Born: July 23, 1976

REPORTS – GIANTS TO INTERVIEW DAVE DeGUGLIELMO AND MARC COLOMBO…
According to media reports, the New York Giants will interview Miami Dolphins Offensive Line Coach Dave DeGuglielmo and Dallas Cowboys Offensive Line Coach Marc Colombo this week for the team’s vacant offensive line coaching position.

The 51-year old DeGuglielmo has served as offensive line coach for the Dolphins (2019, 2009-2011), offensive line coach for the Indianapolis Colts (2018), senior offensive assistant for the Dolphins (2017), assistant offensive line coach for the San Diego Chargers (2016), offensive line coach for the New England Patriots (2014-2015), offensive line coach for the New York Jets (2012), assistant offensive line coach for the New York Giants (2004-2008), as well as a series of college jobs coaching the offensive line for the University of South Carolina, University of Connecticut, and Boston University.

The 41-year old Colombo has served as offensive line coach for the Cowboys (2018-2019) and assistant offensive line coach for the Cowboys (2016-2018).

ARTICLES…

Jan 182020
 
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New York Giants Helmet (November 24, 2019)

© USA TODAY Sports

NEW YORK GIANTS OFFICIALLY ANNOUNCE NEW COORDINATORS…
Late on Friday night, the New York Giants officially announced that they have hired Patrick Graham as assistant head coach and defensive coordinator and Jason Garrett as offensive coordinator. The team also retained Thomas McGaughey as special teams coordinator.

“We’re setting out to develop a smart, tough and really sound football team and that’s going to start with the coordinators setting the tone in each room,” said new Head Coach Joe Judge. “Each one has experience, each one has the ability to run multiples (schemes), put the pressure on the opponent, and each one is an excellent teacher.

“All these guys were priorities to add to our staff. You have a short list when you come into this and you make sure you go ahead and take your time and get those guys in with whatever it takes. The priority is to put the best teachers and the best people around your players so you can form a strong locker room and make them fundamentally sound and situational. And I think all three of these guys bring that to the team.”

Assistant Head Coach/Defensive Coordinator Patrick Graham: The 40-year old Graham was also named assistant head coach. Before becoming defensive coordinator of the Miami Dolphins in 2019, Graham was the defensive run game coordinator and inside linebackers coach for the Green Bay Packers (2018), defensive line coach for the New York Giants (2016-2017), linebackers coach for the New England Patriots (2011, 2014-2015), defensive line coach for the New England Patriots (2012-2013), defensive assistant for the New England Patriots (2010), coaching assistant for New England Patriots (2009), defensive line coach for the University of Toledo (2009), graduate assistant for the University of Notre Dame (2007-2008), tight ends coach for University of Richmond (2005-2006), defensive line coach for the University of Richmond (2004), and a graduate assistant for Wagner College (2002-2003).

“We’ve had a lot of discussions, both before he came here as well as since he’s been here, in terms of what he would want to do with the scheme,” Judge said. “We share the same vision to be able to run multiples and use the players on our roster to the best of their ability to match up against the opponent.”

Offensive Coordinator Jason Garrett: The 53-year old Garrett served as head coach of the Dallas Cowboys since 2011. Before that, he served in other roles for the Cowboys, including interim head coach (2010), assistant head coach and offensive coordinator (2008-2010), and offensive coordinator (2007). He was also quarterbacks coach of the Miami Dolphins (2005-2006). The Cowboys decided not to renew Garrett’s contract when it expired on Tuesday.

“I’ve known about Jason for a long time, not only through the general public as well-known as he is as head coach of the Cowboys,” Judge said. “There were guys I worked with that I came across in my career at both Alabama and at the New England Patriots that worked with Jason through their time in Miami with him. They consistently all reflected on how smart he is, how great a teacher he is and how his perspective of the game was through a different lens than most coaches. And when he sees it, he’s able to communicate it and paint that mental image to the players. And he does a fantastic job of making in-game adjustments.

“We had some great conversations when we were able to bring him in here. It was a great opportunity to get to know each other a little better than we had before. It was a great opportunity to sit there and talk ball and share philosophies and views on the game. It’s a great system he brings with great teaching that will allow our players to go out there and play aggressively.”

Special Teams Coordinator Thomas McGaughey: The 46-year old McGaughey, who was hired as special teams coordinator by former Head Coach Pat Shurmur in 2018, will remain in the same position under new Head Coach Joe Judge. McGaughey’s previous special teams experience also includes coordinator jobs with the Carolina Panthers, San Francisco 49ers, and New York Jets.

“I’ve known T-Mac from going against him as well as being in the business and I have a good relationship with him professionally and personally,” Judge said. “I have a lot of respect for him as a coach and I have a tremendous amount of respect for him as a person. He gets the most out of his players. I’ve competed against him and I knew it was always going to be tough sledding in the game there. From the perspective of having to go against him, you understand you don’t want to get him out of the building; you want to hold onto guys like that. They’re definitely key assets. He and (Assistant Special Teams Coach) Tom Quinn do an outstanding job of working together, coaching the players in techniques and coming up with schemes for game plans that allow them to apply pressure on the opponents.”

FREDDIE ROACH STAYING AT MISSISSIPPI STATE…
According to the University of Mississippi, their team’s defensive line coach, Freddie Roach, will not be joining the New York Giants as previously reported. It appears the school gave Roach a promotion that included new roles as assistant head coach and recruiting coordinator to keep him.

Jan 172020
 
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Jason Garrett, Dallas Cowboys (October 13, 2019)

Jason Garrett – © USA TODAY Sports

REPORTS – GIANTS HIRE JASON GARRETT AS OFFENSIVE COORDINATOR…
Multiple media outlets are reporting that the New York Giants have hired former Dallas Cowboys Head Coach Jason Garrett as the team’s new offensive coordinator. The Cowboys decided not to renew Garrett’s contract when it expired on Tuesday. Ironically, the Giants had expressed interest in interviewing Garrett for their head-coaching vacancy before hiring Joe Judge.

The 53-year old Garrett served as Dallas’ head coach since 2011, accruing an 85–67 (.559) regular-season record and a 2-3 (.400) post-season record. Before that, he served in other roles for the Cowboys, including interim head coach (2010), assistant head coach and offensive coordinator (2008-2010), and offensive coordinator (2007). He was also quarterbacks coach of the Miami Dolphins (2005-2006).

Garrett also was a well-traveled, journeyman back-up quarterback who spent time with five NFL teams, including the New York Giants (2000-2003).

REPORT – GIANTS HIRE BURTON BURNS AS RUNNING BACKS COACH…
SiriusXM is reporting that the New York Giants have hired University of Alabama Assistant Athletic Director for Football Burton Burns as the team’s new running back coach. The 67-year old Burns served as running backs coach with Alabama (2007-2017) and Clemson University (1999-2006). Before that he was an assistant coach with Tulane University (1994-1998) and Southern University (1981-1985).

REPORT – GIANTS TO INTERVIEW SCOTT LINEHAN…
ESPN is reporting that new Head Coach Joe Judge is interested in interviewing Scott Linehan, who last served as offensive coordinator of the Dallas Cowboys from 2015 to 2018 and passing game coordinator in 2014. It is not known for which position Linehan will interview. Linehan served under new Giants’ offensive coordinator Jason Garrett in Dallas.

The 56-year old Linehan also was offensive coordinator of the Detroit Lions (2009- 2013), head coach of the St. Louis Rams (2006-2008), offensive coordinator of the Miami Dolphins (2005), and offensive coordinator/wide receivers coach of the Minnesota Vikings (2002-2004). Before that, he served in a number of offensive positions with the University of Louisville, University of Washington, University of Idaho, and the University of Nevada Las Vega.

REPORT – GIANTS DENIED REQUEST TO INTERVIEW BRIAN DABOLL …
SNY is reporting that new Head Coach Joe Judge requested permission to interview Buffalo Bills Offensive Coordinator Brian Daboll, but the Bills denied that request.

Jan 152020
 
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Jason Garrett, Dallas Cowboys (December 22, 2019)

Jason Garrett – © USA TODAY Sports

REPORT – GIANTS INTERVIEWING JASON GARRETT FOR OFFENSIVE COORDINATOR…
The NFL Network is reporting that new New York Giants Head Coach Joe Judge is interviewing former Dallas Cowboys Head Coach Jason Garrett for the team’s vacant offensive coordinator position. The Cowboys decided not to renew Garrett’s contract when it expired on Tuesday. Ironically, the Giants had expressed interest in interviewing Garrett for their head-coaching vacancy before hiring Judge.

The 53-year old Garrett served as Dallas’ head coach since 2011, accruing a 85–67 (.559) regular-season record and a 2-3 (.400) post-season record. Before that he served in other roles for the Cowboys, including interim head coach (2010), assistant head coach and offensive coordinator (2008-2010), and offensive coordinator (2007). He was also quarterbacks coach of the Miami Dolphins (2005-2006).

Garrett also was a well-traveled, journeyman back-up quarterback who spent time with five NFL teams, including the New York Giants (2000-2003).

REPORT – JOE JUDGE INTERVIEWED MIKE SHULA FOR OFFENSIVE COORDINATOR…
ESPN is reporting that new Head Coach Joe Judge interviewed Mike Shula for the team’s vacant offensive coordinator position on Monday. Shula served in the same capacity for the Giants under recently-fired Head Coach Pat Shurmur in 2018-2019. However, Shula did not call the plays under Shurmur, who handled those responsibilities himself.

The 54-year old Shula has also been offensive coordinator for the Carolina Panthers (2013-2017), quarterbacks coach for the Panthers (2011-2012), quarterbacks coach for the Jacksonville Jaguars (2007-2010), head coach at the University of Alabama (2003-2006), quarterbacks coach for the Miami Dolphins (2000-2002), offensive coordinator for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1996-1999), tight ends coach for the Chicago Bears (1993-1995), coaches assistant for the Dolphins (1991-1992), quarterbacks coach for the Buccaneers (1990), and offensive assistant for the Buccaneers ( 1988-1989).

REPORTS – PATRICK GRAHAM ALSO DESIGNATED ASSISTANT HEAD COACH…
Multiple sources are reporting that Patrick Graham will not only be the team’s new defensive coordinator, but will also be given the title of assistant head coach. The 40-year old Graham served with new Head Coach Joe Judge on the New England Patriots staff from 2012 to 2015 until he joined former Head Coach Ben McAdoo’s staff with the Giants in 2016-2017. Graham’s first year as a defensive coordinator was 2019, when the undermanned Miami defense finished 30th in the NFL in yards allowed and 32nd in points allowed.

Before becoming Miami’s defensive coordinator, Graham was the defensive run game coordinator and inside linebackers coach for the Green Bay Packers (2018), defensive line coach for the New York Giants (2016-2017), linebackers coach for the New England Patriots (2011, 2014-2015), defensive line coach for the New England Patriots (2012-2013), defensive assistant for the New England Patriots (2010), coaching assistant for New England Patriots (2009), defensive line coach for the University of Toledo (2009), graduate assistant for the University of Notre Dame (2007-2008), tight ends coach for University of Richmond (2005-2006), defensive line coach for the University of Richmond (2004), and a graduate assistant for Wagner College (2002-2003).

REPORTS – NEW YORK GIANTS ASSISTANT COACHES NOT BEING RETAINED…
According to various reports, the following New York Giants assistant coaches who served under former Head Coach Pat Shurmur will not be retained:

  • Defensive Line Coach Gary Emanuel
  • Inside Linebackers Coach Bill McGovern
  • Outside Linebackers Coach Mike Dawson
  • Defensive Backs Coach Everett Withers
  • Assistant Defensive Backs Coach Henry Baker
  • Offensive Assistant Ryan Roeder

In addition, Tight Ends Coach Lunda Wells has also accepted the same position with the Dallas Cowboys.

DEXTER LAWRENCE NAMED TO PFW ALL-ROOKIE TEAM…
The Professional Football Writers of America (PFW) have named defensive lineman Dexter Lawrence to their 2019 All-Rookie Team. Lawrence started all 16 games, playing 63 percent of all defensive snaps, and accruing 38 tackles, 2.5 sacks, 1 pass defense, and 1 forced fumble. The Giants drafted Lawrence in the 1st round of the 2019 NFL Draft.

Jan 152020
 
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NFL: Pro Football Hall of Fame Game-Atlanta Falcons vs Denver Broncos

© USA TODAY Sports

Former New York Giants General Manager George Young, who passed away in 2001 at the age of 71, has been elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Young served as general manager of the franchise from 1979 until 1997. He is credited with bringing the Giants out of dark period when the team failed to make the playoffs during a 17 stretch, from 1964 until 1981. Under his guidance and supervision, the Giants made the playoffs eight times in 19 seasons, culminated by two Super Bowl championships in 1986 and 1990. Young was also named “NFL Executive of the Year” five times, including after the 1984, 1986, 1990, 1993, and 1997 seasons.

“George is certainly very deserving of being in the Hall of Fame,” said team President and Chief Executive Officer John Mara. “My only regret is that he’s not around to enjoy this. He took our organization from being in last place and not having a lot of respect around the league to being a Super Bowl Champion. He made every football department in our organization more professional. He changed the reputation and level of respect that our team had for the better. He improved us in so many different ways. He certainly is a very deserving Hall of Famer. Again, I only wish he could be around to enjoy this moment. It’s long overdue. All of us here are very happy that at long last he will be enshrined in Canton, Ohio.”

“George Young transformed our organization,” said team Chairman and Executive Vice President Steve Tisch. “My father (the late Bob Tisch, who purchased Tim Mara’s 50 percent ownership in 1991) always appreciated George’s leadership and vision, and George was vital to our family as we transitioned from our traditional business interests into the National Football League. For that, we are grateful, and his election to the Pro Football Hall of Fame is most deserving and a long time coming.”

“George Young’s career is the very definition of a Hall of Famer,” said Ernie Accorsi, who worked under Young and succeeded him as general manager. “From assistant coach to scout to general manager to trusted advisor to Commissioner (Paul) Tagliabue, every step of the way there was excellence. There isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t think of George or something I learned from him. The only bittersweet part is that he’s not here. But as the great Beano Cook would say, ‘If the Gipper knew, George knows.’”

Young came to the Giants in 1979 when then NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle suggested that team ownership hire him during a family feud between co-owners Wellington Mara and his nephew Tim Mara. Young was responsible for drafting a slew of New York Giants legends, including quarterback Phil Simms; running backs Joe Morris, Rodney Hampton, and Tiki Barber; wide receiver Amani Toomer; tight end Mark Bavaro; defensive ends Leonard Marshall and Michael Strahan; and linebackers Lawrence Taylor, Carl Banks, and Jessie Armstead. He also hired Ray Perkins, Bill Parcells, Ray Handley, Dan Reeves, and Jim Fassel as head coaches.

“I think this would have meant a lot to George because he always had a great appreciation for the history of the game and he had so much respect for people who were enshrined in the Hall,” Mara said “I think this would have meant the world to him, even though he may not have admitted to that. I think this would have had a huge impact on him. Again, I’m really sorry he’s not around to enjoy it.”

“He would be very, very happy and fulfilled by this,” said Accorsi. “This would have been something he cherished, because the game meant so much to him.”

Complete List of New York Giants in the Pro Football Hall of Fame

Jan 132020
 
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Jerry Schuplinski, New England Patriots (November 12, 2017)

Tom Brady and Jerry Schuplinski – © USA TODAY Sports

REPORTS – GIANTS HIRE PATRICK GRAHAM AS DEFENSIVE COORDINATOR…
Multiple media sources are reporting that the New York Giants have hired Miami Dolphins Defensive Coordinator Patrick Graham for the same position with the Giants.

The 40-year old Graham served with new Head Coach Joe Judge on the New England Patriots staff from 2012 to 2015 until he joined former Head Coach Ben McAdoo’s staff with the Giants in 2016-2017. Graham’s first year as a defensive coordinator was 2019, when the undermanned Miami defense finished 30th in the NFL in yards allowed and 32nd in points allowed.

Before becoming Miami’s defensive coordinator, Graham was the defensive run game coordinator and inside linebackers coach for the Green Bay Packers (2018), defensive line coach for the New York Giants (2016-2017), linebackers coach for the New England Patriots (2011, 2014-2015), defensive line coach for the New England Patriots (2012-2013), defensive assistant for the New England Patriots (2010), coaching assistant for New England Patriots (2009), defensive line coach for the University of Toledo (2009), graduate assistant for the University of Notre Dame (2007-2008), tight ends coach for University of Richmond (2005-2006), defensive line coach for the University of Richmond (2004), and a graduate assistant for Wagner College (2002-2003).

REPORT – GIANTS HIRE JERRY SCHUPLINSKI AS QUARTERBACKS COACH…
The NFL Network is reporting that the New York Giants have hired Miami Dolphins Assistant Quarterbacks Coach Jerry Schuplinski as the team’s new quarterbacks coach.

Schuplinski served with new Head Coach Joe Judge on the New England Patriots staff from 2013 to 2018.

Before becoming Miami’s assistant quarterbacks coach in 2019, Schuplinski served in the same role with the Patriots from 2016-2018. He also was a coaching assistant for the Patriots (2013-2015), linebackers/special teams coach for Case Western Reserve University (2007-2012), head coach of Trinity High School in Ohio (2002-2006), and running backs/special teams coach at John Carroll University (2000-2001).

REPORT – GIANTS HIRE FREDDIE ROACH AS DEFENSIVE LINE COACH…
SiriusXM is reporting that the New York Giants have hired University of Mississippi Defensive Line Coach Freddie Roach for the same position with the Giants.

The 36-year old Roach served with new Head Coach Joe Judge on the University of Alabama’s staff from 2009-2010.

Before becoming Mississippi’s defensive line coach in 2017, Roach served as director of player development at Alabama (2015-2016), defensive ends/linebackers coach at the University of South Alabama (2013-2014), defensive line coach at Murray State University (2012), defensive line coach and director of strength and conditioning at East Mississippi Community College (2011), and assistant strength and conditioning coach at Alabama (2008-2010). He also played linebacker at Alabama (2002-2005).

Jan 122020
 
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Patrick Graham, Green Bay Packers (June 4, 2018)

Patrick Graham – © USA TODAY Sports

GIANTS REQUEST INTERVIEW WITH PATRICK GRAHAM FOR DEFENSIVE COORDINATOR…
The NFL Network is reporting that the New York Giants have requested permission to interview Miami Dolphins Defensive Coordinator Patrick Graham for the same position with the Giants. The NFL Network is also reporting that the permission is expected to be granted.

The 40-year old Graham served with new Head Coach Joe Judge on the New England Patriots staff from 2012 to 2015 until he joined former Head Coach Ben McAdoo’s staff with the Giants in 2016-2017. Graham’s first year as a defensive coordinator was 2019, when the undermanned Miami defense finished 30th in the NFL in yards allowed and 32nd in points allowed.

Before becoming Miami’s defensive coordinator, Graham was the defensive run game coordinator and inside linebackers coach for the Green Bay Packers (2018), defensive line coach for the New York Giants (2016-2017), linebackers coach for the New England Patriots (2011, 2014-2015), defensive line coach for the New England Patriots (2012-2013), defensive assistant for the New England Patriots (2010), coaching assistant for New England Patriots (2009), defensive line coach for the University of Toledo (2009), graduate assistant for the University of Notre Dame (2007-2008), tight ends coach for University of Richmond (2005-2006), defensive line coach for the University of Richmond (2004), and a graduate assistant for Wagner College (2002-2003).

REPORT – JOE JUDGE TO RETAIN TYKE TOLBERT AS WIDE RECEIVERS COACH…
The NFL Network is reporting that new Head Coach Joe Judge has decided to retain Tyke Tolbert as the team’s wide receiver coach. If earlier reports are also accurate, Tolbert is the second coach from former Head Coach Pat Shurmur’s staff to be retained, joining Special Teams Coordinator Thomas McGaughey.

The 52-year old Tolbert has served as New York’s wide receivers coach since 2018. Before that, he served in the same position with the Denver Broncos (2011-2017), Carolina Panthers (2010), Buffalo Bills (2004-2009), and Arizona Cardinals (2003). His college experience included tight ends coach at the University of Florida (2002), wide receivers coach at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (1999-2001), tight ends coach at Auburn University (1998), tight ends coach at the University of Louisiana Monroe (1995-1997), wide receivers coach at Ohio University (1995), and a graduate assistant with the University of Louisiana Monroe (1994).

Jan 092020
 
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Joe Judge, New York Giants (January 9, 2020)

Joe Judge – © USA TODAY Sports

JOE JUDGE INTRODUCTORY PRESS CONFERENCE…
Joe Judge was officially introduced as the new head coach of the New York Giants at a press conference on Thursday at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey.

Opening Remarks by Team President/CEO John Mara (Video)
Good afternoon and welcome. We began our search for a new head coach immediately after our season ended. I just wanted to make a few comments about that process. This was the deepest and most talented group of candidates that I’ve ever seen, and as a number of you have made note of, I’ve had quite a bit of experience in recent years in interviewing coaching candidates. We liked all of the coaches that we interviewed, we did not eliminate any of them from consideration. All of them made a great impression and were really interested in this job. We would have been pleased to have had any one of them as our head coach. For me, our search ended on Monday afternoon when we finished our session with Joe Judge. I have to tell you that this was perhaps the best coach interview that I have ever been a part of. When Steve (Tisch) met with him on Tuesday morning, he felt just as strongly as we did. Joe is someone who has certainly been on our radar for the last couple of years. When a coach works under Nick Saban and then finds his way onto Bill Belichick’s staff, that’s something that you take note of. Joe has been a part of three Super Bowls with New England and two National Championships with Nick Saban at Alabama. What came through in the interview was his poise, his confidence, his leadership, his knowledge of the game, what it takes to build a winning program, his ability to relate to players, and then of course, his work ethic. He’s a teacher, he’s a communicator, he’s somebody who demands and commands respect, and he just has a certain presence about him. For all of those reasons, on behalf of the Mara and Tisch families, I am very pleased to introduce Joe Judge as the new Head Coach of the New York Giants.

Remarks by Head Coach Joe Judge

Joe Judge’s Opening Statement: Thank you. First, I’d like to start by thanking the Mara and the Tisch families, Mr. Gettleman, Kevin Abrams, for this wonderful opportunity. I do not take it lightly the position I’m in and the people, the city, and the region I represent. I’d like to thank my family, my wife, my mother, my children, all of my close friends who have made each step of this process to enable me to be where I am today, which is just another step in the process of where we’re trying to go. I’d like to thank all of my former coaches that I have ever played or worked under for building in me the foundation of fundamentals that has allowed me to teach and instruct at a high level, to again put me in this position. I would like to start with (New England Patriots Head Coach) Coach Belichick, and (Alabama Football Head Coach) Coach Saban, (Former New England Patriots Special Teams) Coach Scotty O’Brien, (Former Mississippi State Special Teams and Linebackers) Coach Amos Jones, (Former Mississippi State Head Coach) Coach Sylvester Croom, (Former Mississippi State Head Coach) Coach Jackie Sherrill and (Former Lansdale Catholic High Football Coach) Coach Jim Algeo. I would be remiss if I didn’t thank my own father, who was my first coach and taught me the most important lesson is you hold those you expect the most from at the highest standard. Now, I would also like to thank all of the players who ever played under me. They gave everything, that’s what I expect. I was very demanding, and I’ll continue to be demanding. But, you expect the players to be held to a certain standard and for all of the ones who have ever played under me to this point, I appreciate your work and your sacrifice to allow me to have this opportunity that I have today, and it’s just an opportunity. I have to make the most of it. That starts today.

Now, there is a question out there that I’m sure a lot of people are asking, and that’s number one – who am I? Well, maybe I can explain that a little bit better, but instead of saying, ‘Who am I,’ by telling you what’s relevant in this conversation with being the coach of the New York Giants— what I’m about. What I’m about is an old school physical mentality. We’re going to put a product on the field that the people of this city and region are going to be proud of because this team will represent this area. We will play fast, we will play downhill, we will play aggressive. We will punch you in the nose for 60 minutes, we will play every play like it has a history and a life of its own, with a relentless, competitive attitude. We will play fundamentally sound, we will not beat ourselves. That is our mission right here. I’m about caring for the players in the locker room. Let’s not forget there’s a human element to this game. Let’s not think that in professional sports that paying a pay check to somebody makes it absent of empathy. We need to make sure that we take care of the players in our locker room, that we treat them the right way, that we teach them the correct techniques, and that we put them in the right situations to be successful. We’re going to ask these men to come in and give everything they have every day. We’re going to demand it, and we appreciate everything they give us. It’s our responsibility to take care of them on a daily basis and make sure that when they are done with our game, they are better furthered for the rest of their career as a father, a husband, and a professional in whatever avenue they take.

Now, what this team’s going to look like. I mentioned earlier, I want this team to reflect this area. I want the people that pay their hard-earned money and the neighborhoods of New York, North Jersey, South Jersey, to come to our games and know that the players on the field play with the same attitude they wake up with every morning. That is blue collar, it’s hard work, it’s in your face. We’re not going to back down from anybody. We’re going to come to work every day and grind it out the way they do in their jobs every day, and they can invest their money in our program knowing it’s worthwhile. They put a Giants uniform on, they put a Giants hat or jersey on, that it’s not representing just the 53 on the field, but it’s representing their neighborhoods, their communities and their families with the values they have instilled in their children.

Now, at this moment, my priorities are pretty simple. I have an outsider’s view of this team, I’ve competed against the Giants, I’ve studied this team from the outside looking in, preparing myself for this job and opportunity, but I have to make myself fluent in a language within the building. I have to study the players, I have to evaluate the current coaching staff and give everybody a fair evaluation to make sure we make the right decisions, that I have a clear vision of what the path going forward needs to be, to help these players progress the correct way. Relative to staff, I do not have a staff in place. Yes, I have some names in mind, but we will talk to everybody, we will take our time. My priority is to put the right men around these players that they can come to work every day, they can be coached hard, they can be taught. I want good people. Before anything, if you’re going to work in an organization, you’re a good person. I don’t want any alternative agendas, I’m making that clear right now. There is not going to be a coach in our organization who has nothing but the best interest in the players at hand and isn’t going to come to work every day and put their butt on the line for the guys who are going to work hard for them. I want teachers, not presenters. I don’t want someone who looks fancy in front of the screen that can say it with a lot of different sales lines. I want teachers, I want old school people who can get to our players and give them the mental image of what it’s supposed to look like. I want them to demonstrate on a daily basis the work ethic of what it’s going to take to do it successfully day in and day out. Because over the course of six months of this season, it takes day in and day out to be successful. The margins of error in this league are too small. You cannot get by with some kind of magic scheme or new gimmick or think you’ve reinvented the wheel. The same things win football games that have always won football games. It’s fundamentals. Those fundamentals will start for us in the classroom. They’ll start with being in meetings on time, they’ll start with being on the field on time in the proper dress. They’ll start with knowing your playbook, they’ll start with being out there and stretching the right way and warming your body up the right way that you prevent any kind of soft tissue injuries on the field. Then they’ll carry over to the fundamentals on the field—it’s running, it’s tackling, it’s ball security. It’s a contact sport, you can’t get around that. It’s meant to be a physical game. It’s for tough people. We will practice with a physical attitude. We will practice in pads, we will practice live tackling—not to make a statement that we’re trying to be tough. We’re going to practice live tackling because I believe in doing it safely. You want to make your players safer, you start by instructing them how to do it. We’re going to work on everything we do. Everything we ask them to do at full speed on Sunday at a competitive level we’re going to make sure that we have practiced, corrected, and re-practiced before they have to do it at a live pace. There are not going to be shortcuts with what we have to do. It’s a tough division, it’s a tough division and the city is full of tough people and they expect to see a program, they expect to see a product, that represents them. I’m going to do everything in my power, every day, to make sure the people of this city and this area turn on the TV or sit in the stadium seats and are proud to say that we’re their New York Giants. Now, from this point forward, any questions you may have I’d be happy to answer to the best of my ability.

Q: You said yesterday in the statement that you guys were in conversation about where this team is and where it is headed and how you’re going to get there. My question is— how are you going to get there?
A: Well, exactly what I just said a second ago. We’re going to start by showing up on time, by having a plan, for executing that plan. It’s going to be fundamentals. I’ll tell you this right now, and I’m sure it’s going to come up somewhere along the line—I’m not going to be the offensive coordinator, the defensive coordinator, or the special teams coordinator. I’ll work with all three sides of the ball. But, the primary focus I’m going to have as the head coach is I’m going to make sure we are fundamentally sound, we are situationally aware, and that we play with a relentless effort.

Q: I’m curious about your conversations with Dave Gettleman and your conversation about personnel, your input, his input, and how that relationship is going to work as you coach this team.
A: I couldn’t have been more excited walking in here than sitting down with Mr. Gettleman. It’s been tremendous. Listen, from a scout’s view, from a coach’s view, the one thing that I’ve been privileged to do is my role in New England when I first went there was heavy on personnel. Being a special teams coach, you have to know every player on your team inside and out because you have to know who you can use with a limited menu. It’s kind of like when you’re hungry, you go to the fridge, your Dad says figure out a way to make a sandwich. You know it’s in there, but you’ve got to find a way because you’ve got to eat. So, I’ve got to know what everybody does so I can put those ingredients together and get the most out of it. So, what I’ve prepared myself for was leading into every draft I studied every player in the draft as a player and an athlete. I didn’t look at them as a receiver, I didn’t look at them as a tight end, I didn’t look at them as a linebacker. I want to know how they moved— are they stiff in the hips, are they a straight-line speed guy, do they use their hands, what kind of short area quickness do they have, what kind of top end speed do they have, do they turn down contact. So, I’m used to looking at things from a big picture perspective on players in terms of what they bring to the team as a whole. You can turn around and say, ‘How good is this guy as a running back?’ Well, there’s different kinds of running backs. I want to know what kind of athlete this man is and how we can use his toolset to our advantage.

Q: Obviously an outside perspective, what is your first impression of Daniel Jones from his rookie season, and then for his offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach, what are you looking for from a coaching perspective?
A: So, I’m going to answer both of those questions, and I don’t want to be confused in this, I want to make sure I make this clear, again, I have an outsider’s perspective. We have a lot of talent on this roster. It’s been assembled that way for a reason, I don’t want to sit here and try to give you expert analysis without having done my due diligence and homework to sit down and thoroughly investigate each one of these players. They all have ability. I’m excited to work with every player on our roster. Every player on our roster has talent, and every player on our roster will compete for whatever they get. Nothing will be handed out. In terms of the coaches, again, I want to reference back to I’m looking for teachers. I’m sure the next question is going to be something relative to, ‘What I look for in the offensive system?’ Well, I can answer that of all three systems—offense, defense, and special teams. Our philosophy is going to be to put pressure on the opponent to prepare for multiple things. Within that, we have to have personnel versatility and we have to have flexibility schematically to make sure that whoever we play, we can adjust our game plan to maximize our strengths versus their weaknesses. So, while there may be some games that we throw the ball 50 times, there’s going to be other times we may throw it 10 times and run the ball 45 times. So, I don’t have a crystal ball, Miss Cleo can help you better with that, but we’re going to look for the best system to help us week by week.

Q: Clearly, the Giants were very impressed with your work with two great coaches, Saban and Belichick, and that’s looked great for you on the resume. How are you different from them? The big thing everybody wants to know is, you’re not those guys, how are you your own man?
A: Well, I think when you work with anybody, you try to grow as much as you can from them. You’re going to always have the opportunity to learn lessons if you pay attention and are willing to learn something new. I worked for two great coaches, Coach Belichick and Coach Saban, and there wasn’t a day I went to work that I didn’t come home with a full new education and I knew fully every day that there were coaches out there that would pay thousands of dollars to sit in a staff meeting and just hear the wisdom they were saying on a daily basis. I’d like to think I was not foolish enough to squander that. Both have a very unique style about them. Both have a world of knowledge. Both have a lot of the same philosophical views, and a lot of the same values. What I learned from Coach Saban was not an individual lesson. What I learned from Coach Saban is it’s important to address everybody, not only on the what they have to do, but how it should look, what we’re going to do to get there, and why it’s important. And what you find out when you’re coaching players, they’re not robots, and if they understand what the end result is supposed to look like and why it’s important, normally those players are going to take the principles you instilled in them and in the game make a player’s adjustment, and you’re going to learn more from the players than they are as a coach because they’re going to find a better way to do it in the heat of the moment with a certain adjustment. And as a coach, you have to have your eyes open enough to understand they’re making the correct adjustment, you have to find another way to teach in the future to give multiple options. That’s what I learned from Coach Saban, and that applied across the board. That was whether you’re dealing with a person, a player in recruiting, developing a player on the field, or schematics in a game. You better make sure everyone knows the full picture of what you’re looking for. What I learned from Coach Belichick was real simple—be flexible within your personnel. Don’t try to shove round pegs into square holes. Figure out what you have. Let them play to their strengths. Don’t sit in a meeting and tell me what you don’t have in a player. Don’t tell me they can’t do certain things, tell me what they can do and then we’ll figure out as coaches, because that’s our job, how we can use that. That’s our responsibility. Everybody has something they can do. How many castoffs do you see around the league in the NFL on another team that everyone says, ‘Wow, how’d they get that out of them?’ Maybe they just weren’t closing their eyes to what they could do. We have to, as a coaching staff when we get assembled, we have to make sure we’re sitting down, we’re patient with our players, we fully evaluate them, we find out what they can do to be an asset, and that we’re not foolish enough to not use them.

Q: A lot of fans look at this hire and they regarded you as a non-prominent name. There were a lot of prominent names that a lot of fans out there wanted, maybe more so than you, so what do you think of the notion, what do you say to the notion that you’re not the preferred choice for a lot of fans?
A: To be completely honest with you, I’m not really concerned about whoever interviewed for this job. All I’m concerned about is the opportunity I have in front of me and what I have to do going forward. And I’m going to tell my players the same thing, it doesn’t matter how you got there, it doesn’t matter how high-profile you may be or may not be, it’s what you do on a daily basis. If you’re in a position, earn it. Earn it every day. And I appreciate the opportunity, I’m working every day to earn it. And our players have to do the same thing. The best players will play. I don’t care where you got drafted, I don’t care if you’re an undrafted free agent, I don’t care if you’re old, young, traded, whatever you got there for. Everybody will have an opportunity every day to compete for a job on our roster. Every day. If you want to be on the field, be the best player. Outwork the guy in front of you. Prove your value to us, show you can handle the job, and we’re going to put you on the field and give you an opportunity.

Q: Could a culture—and I completely concede it’s an overused work, but I don’t know another better word to use in this example—when you look at taking over the New York Giants, what culture do you want to have in the locker room, and how will you go about making sure that is there?
A: The only culture we’re going to have in that building, period, is a winning culture. And what that means is everybody comes to work every day, regardless of how they feel, and puts the team first, period. Whatever you have going on outside the building, you’re sick, a little bit of pain, you have discomfort, you’re upset, you’re mad, put all that aside. You come in, you put the team first. We’re going to ask our players at times to do things that necessarily may not be what they have in mind for themselves. But if it’s best for the team, they have to be willing to go forward with it, because that’s what a winning culture is.

Q: You’ve mentioned teaching a lot—I know you have a background in teaching. Could you just elaborate on how you plan to teach, and what you look for in teachers alike?
A: Well, I would say teaching is just to inspire learning. And I think what we have to do is, we have to identify how our players learn. Everybody learns different. Everyone learns different. We have to make sure that when we teach we hit the full spectrum of students in the classroom, the full spectrum of our players. We can’t just teach in an old school or a certain way. We have to find whatever’s helpful for these guys to take the information and apply it on the field. Now, whether that may be old school lectures for some guys, or that’s more visual evidence through tape for other guys, or maybe that’s on their feet through walk-thrus for some others, we’re going to as much as what’s necessary to make sure we’re checking the box on every guy. And as a coaching staff, I expect our coaches to know who’s up to speed on what. Don’t tell me you taught the whole room and one guy screwed it up. I want to know what you did to hit that guy. You figure out what he’s a little behind on and you make up the difference. Figure it out, that’s your job. So, to me a teacher is, we talk about no child left behind, but I’m going to tell you right now, if you’re in our locker room, you’re going to get coached. We’re not leaving anyone behind in here. So, I want people that are going to treat the player as a person, find out what makes them tick, what inspires their learning, and make sure we accomplish it every day.

Q: We know about the endorsement that Coach Belichick gave ownership here about you. I’m curious, yes, it’s sort of two-fold, but one, what advice he had for you if you consulted with him and how that went? And I would like to kind of flip side, of all the things on your resume, you haven’t actually been a head coach if I’m correct?
A: You’re absolutely correct in that. I’ve been a kindergarten PE teacher, I have not been a head coach (laughter).

Q: So, just how you sort of sold them with that asterisk on the resume that you were ready to be a head coach.
A: So, I’ll start with the first one, the question about Belichick and his advice. I’ll be honest with you, the only advice I really sought from him as far as this opportunity, he told me just be yourself. And that’s all I know how to be. I think one of the things people ask me a lot is, ‘You worked for Coach Saban, Coach Belichick, what makes you different?’ Look, I’m myself. I’m going to be myself every time. If I’m anything else, everyone’s going to see straight through it. And if you lie to the team, you’re going to lose the team immediately. So, I’m going to always be myself. And that’s a little bit different than other people and that’s fine. I’m not trying to emulate anyone I’ve ever worked for, I’m trying to take what I’ve learned from them and what matches with my own belief structure and do it with my own personality. The second part of the question, as far as being a head coach, you can’t fabricate that experience. And as a young head coach, I’m going to lean on Dave Gettleman, I’m going to lean on the assistants I hire, I’m going to lean on having the right people in the building to fill in some of the blanks that I may have. I’m about transparency and honesty, so I need men in my building who are going to walk in my office and tell me the truth, and we can be on the same page. Now, we may have some disagreements at times, but we’re going to walk out on that field with those players and all have the same vision, same voice, and be on the same page. Relative to how to handle a team, I can tell you that with the experience I’ve had, I feel prepared as being a head coach. From a personnel standpoint, I talked earlier, I have to evaluate everyone from the draft, I have to know who the players in the locker room are. Not just as an athlete in that regard, but personally, because a special teams coach, it’s not just point and click and say go do it. There’s a lot of recruiting that happens at certain times, and you have to find out how every player ticks. And everyone responds differently at different times. And you’ve got your core guys that show up to work and they know they pay their light bill and they’re going to do it every day. But there comes a time where you have to go ahead and go to the starting quarterback and say, ‘Hey buddy, I need you to be the holder this week because we have an issue with an injury.’ You may have to go to a guy that’s a starting linebacker and say, ‘I need you to start on punt team for me this week. You haven’t done it since training camp, but we need you.’ Or you have to go to a guy in the middle of a game and tell him he now has to cover a kick on kickoff. The thing is you have to get to those people early on and develop a relationship with them, a relationship with the entire team to have them trust you to know that you have their best interest at hand and the team’s best interest at hand. So, when you come to them and you ask them to form a task, they trust you that what you’re asking them to do is going to benefit them individually, and as a team collectively. Along with that, look, I’ve had the experience and it’s been beneficial—I get to stand in front of the room every day and coach every player. Every player. When we’re at 90, it’s all 90. When we’re at 53, it’s 53, plus the 10 on practice squad. So, in different adages, I’ve been able to address the team every day. And again, you can’t address the team all in one message. You have to make sure you’re hitting everybody in the room. So, you gain the experience of what the pulse of the team is and what makes them tick. You’re not always addressing them after wins. A lot of times you’ve got to walk in after a tough loss. A lot of times you’ve got to walk in after a tough loss where maybe your unit didn’t play as well as it should have, and you have to grab the attention of those players and not only tell them how we have to correct what was wrong, but why they have to trust you going forward. So, there’s been a lot of experience through the years of having to do that on a daily basis. Special teams, one thing you’ve got to manage is time. Another thing is people. As a head coach, those are the two main things you have to manage, time and people. So, I’ve had experience preparing me for that. I don’t have all the answers. I’m not preparing to sit here and tell you a lie like I have all the answers. But I am telling you I’ll find out the ones I don’t know and make sure by the time we get to the players, they’re the right ones.

Q: This was obviously a goal of yours to become a head coach. Was there anything specific that you did to prepare for this? How much did you talk about being a head coach with Bill to learn how to become a head coach in the process?
A: I think Bill understood my desire to become a head coach because of my involvement overall in a complete team. I never talked about becoming a head coach or walked around and advertised that as a specific goal. To be completely honest with you, I didn’t have a goal this year, specifically right now, of being a head coach right now. This opportunity is very unique. When I received the call from the Giants that they would like to interview me, that was very exciting. There’s 32 teams in this league, that’s not a lot. The reality is there are very few that have a chance at winning, the reality of that is there are very few of those that have a chance at winning that have tradition and history behind them. I don’t take this lightly, there’s not 32 great programs in this league. The truth is the Giants are one of (them) at the top, that’s what makes this job intriguing.

Q: In this interview, was there a moment when it clicked that your vision and the Giants ownership and front office’s vision aligned? What was it like the morning when you found at you were getting the job. Where were you, how did you feel at that moment?
A: I’ll go backwards on that. When I received the phone call and Mr. Mara offered me the job, it was very exciting, it was very humbling. I was actually sitting in my office in Gillette Stadium at the time, I had returned the night before from the interview and basically went in the next day to resume work like I would normally do and make sure I was prepared for what was coming up next. It was very humbling, I think when you get past the initial wave of excitement, and then you realize the task at hand you have, you realize that it’s time to go to work. There’s people depending on you and that’s a humbling feeling. You have to show up every day and do your absolute best because everyone is depending on you to do your absolute best, anything less won’t be acceptable. Without going into too many details about the interview, I would say when we spoke about discipline on the team, that’s something very important to me. I think you need to have the fundamental foundation of discipline on your team, that you hold players accountable. It’s important to have good people in your locker room. It’s a family business for our ownership and it’s a family business for myself. My children have all been born in this business. Knowing that your passion is football, that your desire to win is what you truly love and that benefits your family and you’re representing something bigger than yourself. That moment right there is when it really clicked that this is where I belong and where I want to be.

Q: You just mentioned your family. What was their reaction, specifically your wife and kids, when you got the job?
A: Very exciting, they were very excited. I have a 14-year-old who stays as current as he can on everything. So he is already looking to make GM moves, sorry Mr. Gettleman. He was telling me about the roster when I came home and things we can do. I have an 11-year-old who was kind of speechless when we told him at school, we pulled him out of class to let him know, he couldn’t have been more excited. I’ve got a 9-year-old back there, Emma Riley, and she has a gymnastics meet in Manhattan in a few weeks. She’s been talking about that all fall. Now she gets to have her meet but it’s also her new home, that’s a little bit extra special for her. I haven’t really broken the news yet to Ella because she doesn’t know she has to move but she is very excited to be a part of the Giants.

Q: When you talked about taking the job you said you wanted to be old school. Is that the way you were brought up or is that something that you learned from Belichick and Saban? It sounds very much like Parcells and Coughlin.
A: We used to have posters when I was in kindergarten about sharing and telling the truth and being polite and all that stuff. The thing that I really learned from the great coaches later in my career was really that they reinforced everything that I learned early in my career. That it’s really the basics that carry over. There’s some minutia that gets caught up when you get into the flow of things. Everyone thinks there’s some guru out there with a magical scheme, everyone thinks there’s some short cut to being good. Everything I learned from coach Belichick and coach Saban reinforced on a daily basis that it’s the fundamentals. You don’t build the Empire State Building by washing the windows, you build it with the foundation and work it on up. Whatever your goal is at hand, you can put that in the distance and start working day by day to take a step forward.

Q: You hear coaches talk about how this is a timing business and sometimes you take an opportunity and you take it a year too soon or a year too late. Why is the timing right for you now to be standing here as the new head coach of the Giants?
A: The only thing that’s relevant to me on this is the opportunity with the New York Giants. The timing is now and that’s the only time that is relevant to me.

Q: I know you said you haven’t studied all the players yet. Obviously, you know a little bit about the roster and that there hasn’t been a lot of winning around here recently. How quickly do you think you can turn this around? How big of a job is it to get this back on track?
A: To try to get any team to win in this league is a tough job, they are all tough jobs. Every team is good, they are coached well, they have talent. There is a lot of parity in this league, it’s structured and built that way. Every job in this league has a tough job trying to get a win. I’m not into making predictions about wins. I’m a process-built guy, you focus on the process and you worry about the steps in place you have to execute to get to the end result. I’m not going to circle a number on my board and say we have to get to X number of wins to be successful. I’m worried about when these guys walk into the building in mid-April, what we have to do with them to get them working in the right direction to build from the ground up.

Q: A big part of your job will be dealing with reporters and especially answering questions after games. Just to kind of kick start that process, I’m curious in the last game, what went into the decision not to have someone returning that last punt?
A: I’m not going to get into any specific decisions on schematics. I can assure it was discussions we had before the game and we called it according to what we thought gave our team the best opportunity to win. I appreciate the question. At this point, I’m really looking forward to everything we are doing with the New York Giants. That’s a question that’s probably better fit for Foxborough.

Q: You mentioned something about the things you learned in kindergarten that stayed with you. What did you actually learn by teaching kindergarten?
A: When I got done being a GA (Graduate Assistant) at Mississippi State, which when you are a GA, it’s basically volunteering to be tortured and it’s the best experience you can ever have. I washed cars, I got coffee, I built playsets, I did everything I could do and on top of that, I got to coach football and learn. They kind of paid me 700 bucks a month, which didn’t even cover the rent even in Mississippi. What I learned coaching PE for three days in the West Point School District was the patience you have to have with children. I think I had five or six classes a day in a classroom, it wasn’t a gymnasium, it was a classroom. These kids would come in and I realized I had to have an organized plan with these kids that covered the full 60 minutes I had them. If I let any detail in that plan go to waste, it was going to be chaos. I had kids dancing on the window sills, I had kids peeing themselves, I had kids doing everything. I figured out you have to keep them busy. You have to be detailed and prepared on the front end to make sure that regardless of who your audience is or who your classroom is, you have to have something to keep them busy and occupy them mentally and stimulated that they want to participate in what you are trying to accomplish.

Video of Joe Judge’s post-introductory press conference remarks is also available at Giants.com.

JOHN MARA’S POST-PRESS CONFERENCE REMARKS…
The transcript of team President and CEO John Mara’s post-introductory press conference remarks is available in The Corner Forum. The video is available at Giants.com.

STEVE TISCH’S POST-PRESS CONFERENCE REMARKS…
The transcript of team Chairman and Executive Vice President Steve Tisch’s post-introductory press conference remarks is available in The Corner Forum. The video is available at Giants.com.

DAVE GETTLEMAN’S POST-PRESS CONFERENCE REMARKS…
The transcript of General Manager Dave Gettleman’s post-introductory press conference remarks is available in The Corner Forum. The video is available at Giants.com.

REPORT – THOMAS McGAUGHEY WILL REMAIN SPECIAL TEAMS COODINATOR…
SiriusXMNFL Radio is reporting that Thomas McGaughey, who was hired as special teams coordinator by Pat Shurmur in 2018, will remain in the same position under new Head Coach Joe Judge.

Jan 082020
 
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Joe Judge, New England Patriots (December 17, 2017)

Joe Judge – © USA TODAY Sports

NEW YORK GIANTS OFFICIALLY HIRE JOE JUDGE AS NEW HEAD COACH…
The New York Giants officially announced that they have hired New England Patriots Special Teams Coordinator/Wide Receivers Coach Joe Judge as the team’s new head coach, the 19th in team history. Judge was interviewed by the Giants on Monday by team President/Chief Executive Officer John Mara, General Manager Dave Gettleman, and Vice President of Football Operations/Assistant General Manager Kevin Abrams at the team’s headquarters in East Rutherford, New Jersey. He then met with team Chairman/Executive Vice President Steve Tisch on Tuesday in Providence, Rhode Island.

Judge will be formally introduced at an afternoon press conference on Thursday.

The 38-year old Judge has held mainly special teams titles with the Patriots since 2012, including special teams coordinator and wide receivers coach (2019), special teams coordinator (2015-2018), and special teams assistant (2012-2014). He has also served as University of Alabama special teams assistant/football analyst (2009-2011) and Birmingham-Southern College special teams/linebackers coach (2008).

“I am humbled and honored,” Judge said in a team press release. “I want to thank John Mara, Steve Tisch, Dave Gettleman, and Kevin Abrams for this opportunity. Over the past couple of days we had great conversations about where this team is and where it is headed and how we are going to get there. My job is to lead our players and coaches. The mission is clear, to win games. There is a process to reaching that objective, and we will implement that process and work that process starting today.”

“Joe has prepared for this moment and is ready for the challenge of leading our team,” said Gettleman. “His beliefs and principles are all about the team. Because of his background with special teams working under (New England Patriots Head Coach) Bill Belichick, he has had the experience of evaluating and managing the entire roster. Can’t wait to work with him.”

The Giants ended up interviewing four other head-coaching candidates: Dallas Cowboys Defensive Backs Coach/Defensive Passing Game Coordinator Kris Richard last Thursday, former Green Bay Packers Head Coach Mike McCarthy last Friday, and Kansas City Chiefs Offensive Coordinator Eric Bieniemy and Baltimore Ravens Defensive Coordinator Don “Wink” Martindale last Saturday. McCarthy was hired as the new head coach of the Dallas Cowboys on Monday.

“This was the deepest group of quality candidates I can recall, and Joe is as impressive a candidate as I have interviewed,” Mara said. “We met with Joe on Monday. We did have some other candidates lined up to speak with, but Joe had established the threshold at that point. He knows what winning looks like and should look like. His exposure and experience in New England and Alabama have helped shape his philosophy of building a winning program and culture. We are thankful that he has accepted the responsibility to lead our team.”

“We had a great conversation, and Joe articulated his vision of leadership and team building,” Tisch said. “He clearly learned some valuable lessons in both those areas while working with Bill Belichick and (University of Alabama Head Coach) Nick Saban. He is an impressive young leader, and as we said last week, he will have the full support of ownership to get us where we want to be.”

“Joe has done an outstanding job,” said Belichick. “He’s an excellent coach. He understands the game well, works extremely hard and is a very good teacher of fundamentals. Joe picks up concepts and coaching points quickly. He is an exceptional leader and one of the best coaches I have been around. He has been responsible for coaching units comprised of nearly every player on the roster. That requires an ability to handle many moving parts, make constant adjustments and immediate decisions. I appreciate Joe’s many contributions to our staff and team and wish him well.”

“Joe did a fantastic job for our program early on in our tenure in Tuscaloosa,” said Saban. “He went on to have a lot of success on Bill’s staff in New England. Joe is one of the brightest young coaches in our profession, and I think he will do a tremendous job as the head coach of the New York Giants. They are getting an extremely smart football coach who is very loyal, organized and diligent about getting the job done. We wish Joe and his entire family the best of luck with the Giants.”