May 102018
 
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Paul Perkins, New York Giants (October 3, 2016)

Paul Perkins – © USA TODAY Sports Images

NEW YORK GIANTS WAIVE PAUL PERKINS…
The New York Giants have waived running back Paul Perkins with a non-football injury. The team says Perkins suffered a pectoral injury prior to the start of the team’s offseason strength and conditioning program. The injury required surgery.

Perkins was drafted by the Giants in the 5th round of the 2016 NFL Draft. After a respectable rookie season, Perkins had a very disappointing sophomore season in 2017. Perkins saw both his playing time and productivity markedly decline.

In 2016, Perkins played in 14 regular-season games with one start (regular-season finale). He also started the playoff game. Perkins finished the 2016 regular season with 112 carries for 456 yards (4.1 yards per carry) and 15 catches for 162 yards (10.8 yards per catch).

In 2017, Perkins started the first four games, but then suffered a rib injury and lost his starting job to Orleans Darkwa. He played in 11 games and finished the year with 41 carries for 90 yards (2.2 yards per carry). He also caught eight passes for 46 yards.

THE PLAYERS SPEAK…
Exclusive Giants.com interviews with the following players are available at Giants.com:

  • TE Rhett Ellison (Video)
  • DL Dalvin Tomlinson (Video)
  • LB Avery Moss (Video)

ARTICLES…

Apr 192018
 
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Brandon Marshall, New York Giants (October 8, 2017)

Brandon Marshall – © USA TODAY Sports Images

NEW YORK GIANTS CUT BRANDON MARSHALL…
The New York Giants released wide receiver Brandon Marshall on Thursday after he failed his physical. Marshall was placed on Injured Reserve in October 2017 after suffering an ankle injury in Week 5 that required stabilization surgery to repair torn ligaments. Marshall finished his disappointing debut season with the Giants with only 18 catches for 154 yards (8.6 yards per catch).

Marshall was entering the final year on a 2-year, $11 million contract and was set to count $6,156,250 against the 2018 salary cap. By cutting him, the Giants “saved” $5,156,250 with $1 million lost in dead money. The Washington Post is reporting that Marshall had agreed to take a pay cut in March. No formal re-structuring had taken place however.

Marshall was originally drafted in the 4th round of the 2006 NFL Draft by the Denver Broncos. He has played with the Broncos (2006-2009), Miami Dolphins (2010-2011), Chicago Bears (2012-2014), and Jets (2015-2016). Marshall is a six-time Pro Bowler (2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2015) and two-time All-Pro (2012 and 2015). Marshall is the only player in NFL history with six seasons of 100 or more receptions. In 2016, he started 15 regular-season games despite battling knee and foot injuries that he suffered in Week 2. Marshall caught 59 passes for 788 yards and three touchdowns. Those numbers were down dramatically from his 109-catch, 1,502-yard, 14-touchdown 2015 season. The Giants signed Marshall in March 2017 after he was cut by the New York Jets.

DAVE GETTLEMAN’S 2018 PRE-DRAFT PRESS CONFERENCE…
New York Giants General Manager Dave Gettleman held the team’s annual pre-draft press conference on Thursday. The following is the transcript from the event (video is also available courtesy of Giants.com):

Opening Statement: Just before we begin, I’d like to thank Pat Shurmur, Chris Mara, Chris Pettit, Kevin Abrams, the scouts, the coaches and all of the support staff that we have that are just doing a terrific job helping us put the whole board together. Everybody has done a great job adjusting to the different philosophy and methodology. We have gotten meaningful dialogue and collaboration, we’ve watched a ton of film together and the ensuing dialogue is going to be very insightful and meaningful and my hat is off to all of them. They just did a great job and with that being said, let the games begin.

Q: You mentioned the different philosophies. Can you explain the changes that you brought in?

A: Well, the college football game is so different from ours it is not even close. It is a very, very different game and in the old days we would grade, you would have critical factors and you have position specifics. In the old days you had kids that were on scholarship, a lot of them were five-year guys, there was no such thing as the 20-hour rule and when those guys were coming out, all you had to do was put a little polish on them and you had a player. The guys that are coming out now and I’m not criticizing anybody, they’re not as fundamentally and technically as sound as those guys used to be. So, to grade them position specific and plus since the game has changed, the college game is different, it’s hard for us to really decipher what each player is being asked to do, it’s different. So, what I’ve tried to get everyone to understand is you have to grade the critical factors. You have to grade instincts, competitiveness, strength, explosion, athletic ability, and you’ve got to grade their play. I don’t care what a guy runs on the watch in his underwear, I don’t care. It’s how fast can he play on the field, how does he carry his pads, that’s what’s important, so with this 20-hour rule and everything, you can’t really knock it if we’re going to take a linebacker. You have to be careful if you knock his grade down because he doesn’t shed well. You don’t know what he’s being taught, you don’t know what he’s being told, you don’t know how much time is being spent on that skill and it is a skill, but that is a skill that can be coached, that’s something that we can improve, so that’s why I don’t grade on (?) I’m not as concerned much with the position specifics as I am with the critical factors, so that’s a different way of looking at it. And then just the whole methodology of setting the board up. I learned a really unique way of looking at it when I went to Carolina. I had never seen it before and when I looked at it — of course, I’m a little anxious because these guys got to understand that they are teaching me to a certain degree and they were very gentle (laughs). At the end of the day, it is a great way of looking at it and it really brings clarity to what you do and the other thing is the detail work, really knowing the player, digging deep – what kind of a guy is he? Is he trained? How important is football to him? I think in my opening presser I said I don’t want guys that like to play football, I want guys that hate to lose, that’s what I want. There isn’t anybody in this room that would say, who likes to win and everybody raise their hand, we have gone through this exercise before, it’s just the way it is. It’s that detail work that’s really important and everybody is getting it and it was really neat sitting around and watching film as a group. It’s great from looking at a guy that’s played in the Southeast Conference and it’s great for the scouts that didn’t get an opportunity to see them play. It’s vice versa as you’re looking at players around the country, so I thought it was a great exercise, it was a great teaching moment, we can all learn from each other and I thought that was very good. The scouts were excellent in terms of chiming in and telling me what they thought. I told them at our opening, the first time we all sat down, I said, ‘Listen, you’re getting paid for your opinion. You leave this room wishing you had said something but didn’t, shame on you because you’re not doing your job, you’re thinking about it.’ So it was great. We had a great time to prep, the scouts are home right now, we all got tired of looking at each other and it was time for them to see their families, so they’re home. They will be back Sunday night, we’ll take a good, hard look at the board again on Monday and Tuesday morning and then we’ll be ready to roll.

Q: How close are you to making a final decision at this point or how close are you at narrowing it down to a couple guys?

A: How close? You can’t close your mind. You can’t close your mind. You don’t know what is going to happen.

Q: Well it’s a little easier at No. 2 isn’t it?

A: Sure. Listen, we’ll know when we know. I’m not making any decisions before that.

Q: How important is this pick to the future of this franchise?

A: Well, when you’re picking this high, if you make a mistake, you’re done. We talk that when you miss on a quarterback, you really hurt the franchise for probably five years. It’s a five-year mistake. Yeah, it’s a big decision, but as long as you’ve done your homework and turned all the rocks over, you will come to the right answer. You ask the right questions and you will get the right answers.

Q: The last year or two it seemed like this quarterback class was very anticipated. Now that you have done all of your pre-draft homework, how do you think this group stacks up against other groups of quarterbacks in previous drafts?

A: It’s funny, it’s a really a neat group to evaluate because they are all different players. With the second pick, I’m sitting at Ben and Jerry’s and I’ve got a lot of flavors to look at and they’re all different. I can’t compare it to the ‘83 draft if that’s what you’re asking. The ‘83 draft you had (John) Elway, (Jim) Kelly, (Dan) Marino. C’mon Steve, help me. (Ken) O’Brien, (Tony) Eason at that time on my Patriots.

Q: What about 2004?

A: That was a heck of a group, too. Everything is different and, again, we’re in a different time with college football being just different. It’s funny, when I went to Carolina, at the opening presser they say, (?). I said listen, ‘At the end of the day, I don’t care what kind of quarterback you are, I don’t care who you play for, if you can’t make plays from the pocket, then you can’t win. You can’t win. You’ve got to be able to make plays from the pocket.’ So they take that and they run with it and I am going to trade Cam. The bottom line is all of these guys are interesting, they’re unique, there is depth there for sure and it’s a heck of a group to watch. It’s fun.

Q: When you talk about the quarterbacks in this class and the importance of the position, do you still apply your gold jacket standard?

A: I’m going to turn the question on you. My mother told me that it was never polite to answer a question with a question, but I’m going to do it anyway. If you think about all the quarterbacks that you’ve seen, who of them have made everybody better? That’s what you’re looking for. Does he make everybody around him better? That’s what you’re looking for.

Q: Is it naïve to think that the three days next week where you will see Davis Webb can change your board?

A: Nothing is going to totally change the top of the board. Seeing Davis next week is going to be fun for us because he’s a great kid, he works his fanny off, he has been following Eli (Manning) around like a little puppy dog since he walked in the door and it will be a neat opportunity to see him play. Yeah, sure, everything affects the board. I’d be lying if I said no, but at the end of the day, I’m looking forward to it.

Q: Do you like the fact that there are so many opinions about what you’re going to do at No. 2?

A: Like it? I love it. Are you kidding me? By the way, when you were on Sirius the other day, it was Saturday and I was in here holed up watching film, I was listening to you and it was hysterical what you were saying. I loved it. Yeah, I do.

Q: Was I correct?

A: Yeah, you were in the response that you made that Dave Gettleman doesn’t care about what the media says. It’s true.

Q: When people bring up smokescreens and information has leaked…

A: Let me tell you something – when I was a little kid, every time I lied, I got caught and when I was seven years old, my father kicked my butt and I haven’t lied since then. To me it’s silly, but that’s me.

Q: So who are you picking?

A: I’m taking you, Steve.

Q: That’s a five-year mistake.

A: (Laughs) What else have you got, kids?

Q: Is (Penn State RB) Saquon Barkley a generational talent?

A:  I’m not going to lie. He’s a tremendous talent. You put the film on of a defensive guy and if they’re playing Penn State, then I’m watching Saquon. He’s one of those guys that my mother could have scouted. She could have figured that one out.

Q: If a certain group is considered deep in the draft, do you stay away from that position due to the depth in the later rounds?

A: You’ve got to stay with the value. You have to stay with the value because you guys have heard a million stories, I’ve heard a million and one and you’ve probably heard half a million where a guy says, ‘Don’t worry, he’ll be there in the next round.’ Then the next round comes around and he ain’t there. You have to stay with your board, you have to stay with value. You can’t get too cute. Guys have kind of laughed around the league when we’d be on the clock in Carolina and I’d have my pick in in 28 seconds. If you know what you want, then go do it. Don’t be shy. If you get too cute, you’re going to lose. You’re going to come up on the wrong end and it’s about value. You can never have too many good players at one position.

Q: Along those lines how do you weigh the running back value in the NFL with the talent of a guy like Saquon also taking into account the value of the quarterback in the NFL?

A: I think that the devaluing of the running back is really a myth. If you have a great running back, he immediately makes your quarterback better, your offensive line better and your passing game. So I don’t believe in it. It’s how you evaluate the players, how we value them, how we rate them and then you go on from there.

Q: How much does shelf life come into consideration?

A: That’s dangerous. It’s dangerous to look at it that way. Anthony Munoz failed everybody’s physical and he only played 15 years and went to the Hall of Fame. Thurman Thomas had no ACL – I think he had a pretty long career. You make yourself crazy. You just can’t get into that. It’s the value, it’s the player – does he fit your scheme? If he fits your scheme and the value is there, pull the trigger and keep moving.

Q: What about the value of having the No. 2 pick helps you now as opposed to picking a quarterback helping the franchise in the future?

A: It’s a consideration. It’s a consideration. You think about stuff.

Q: How many good years do you think Eli Manning has left?

A: Well, you know we’ve talked about it. There is no ability to predict that. Eli takes great care of his body, he’s very fit. We watched the film and he still has plenty of arm. Who knows? Did anybody know that, I’m drawing a blank on his name; he played quarterback at the age of 45. Who knows? I know the Oakland kicker Blanda played a game late, right Steve? You played a game late and there was another quarterback, he played for Atlanta. But anyhow, like I said, Eli takes great care of himself, he’s very fit and he still has plenty of arm.

Q: How much does he factor into the equation of what you’re going to do at No. 2?

A: Everybody factors in. Your team factors into the equation, everybody does. Here is the deal – as the G.M., I walk a tight line. I have to look at the short term and I have to look at the long term and that’s the tight rope that I walk and I have to take all that into consideration in making decisions, whether it’s the draft, whether it’s unrestricted free agency, whether it’s trading for an Alec Ogletree. Whatever it is, making claims – you have to think about it. So I’m on that tight rope doing the best I can with the information that I have and we move forward.

Q: What do you say to the idea of picking at No. 2 means you have to take a quarterback?

A: I say hogwash. How is that?

Q: You never traded back in the five drafts in Carolina? Is that philosophical?

A: No, I never did, did I? It just kind of never happened, I guess. I traded up a bunch, I know that. It just kind of never happened. There was nothing ever meaningful enough that would keep me from a player that we had that was there for us to take. I guess that’s what it is. Like I said, you can outsmart yourself and you can have a player there that you like, but someone wants to trade and you go, ‘Alright, I can get extra draft picks.’ Woo and you get into that. Nobody ever offered us – you know what, in Carolina I never got a meaningful enough offer to trade back.

Q: Are you open to it if a meaningful enough offer came your way?

A: Sure. It depends on what’s on the board and who is still on the board. I’m open to it. Listen, you have to be open to everything. You have to listen. You can’t be afraid of conversation. You have to be open.

Q: Do you get more offers and calls because of your position?

A: We’ve had calls. I’ll admit to that.

Q: What do you think the likelihood is of you making a move?

A: I’m not going to put a percentage on that. If I had the answer to that, I wouldn’t be sitting here and I would be in Vegas.

Q: Are you adamant that you have to get a great player in this draft?

A: Sometimes you have to look at it this way and I’m not saying this is the way I always look at it, but sometimes you have to look at it this way – we’re all in school, do I want to get an A and four C’s or do we want an A-, a couple of B+’s and a couple of B’s? Winning requires depth. If you don’t have depth – I’ve seen teams that had great defenses that folded in the fourth quarter because they had no depth and now you’ve got guys on the field for 95-98 percent playing time. You can’t win that way, guys wear down, so there is obviously different ways of looking at it depending upon what the A looks like. But, if you get a chance to accumulate quality, you put yourself in a position to potentially accumulate picks and have a lot of very solid players, there is nothing wrong with that. There is nothing wrong with that.

Q: There is a report that you are releasing Brandon Marshall. Can you comment on that?

A: Really? Yes, we have.

Q: Why now?

A: We’re releasing him – failed physical.

Q: Does that mean that you guys have interest in Dez Bryant?

A: I have interest in everybody. We do our film work and you never know.

Q: Now that we’re closer to the draft, are you able to say for sure that Odell Beckham Jr. is not going to be traded?

A: I’m not going to say. He’s on our team, he’s a valued member of our football team.

Q: Is No. 2 too high to draft a lineman?

A: It was really funny, we did some background work and there has only been one interior guy taken with the second pick of the draft and it was in (1966) and it was (Tom Mack) of the Rams. Brandon Scherff was taken at No. 5. In the old days, people would shoot you in the head. You were considered brain dead and they’d drag you out by your toes. Is it ever too early to take a great player? You know my philosophy – big men allow you to compete and you have to build your lines. I’m going to build this team from the inside out. You look at the teams that go deep in the playoffs, you turn around and you take a look at how (Eagles General Manager) Howie (Roseman) has built Philly – both fronts, let’s go. Because again, those three truths don’t change, you’ve got to run the ball, you’ve got to defend the run and rush the passer. So, everyone else wants to talk about skill guys and I want to talk about hog mollies.

Q: You said that you’ve traded up a lot. Do you have enough assets to trade up in this draft and would you dip into future drafts to trade up?

A: I’m not going to do that. I’m going to tell you that right now. Right now, I have no intention of dipping into future drafts. None.

Q: Can you explain how you set up your draft board?

A: It’s a combination of vertical – by position, you set it up vertically and then once you’ve set your values on the players vertically, then you start working horizontally. So, let’s say that I’ve got Russ Salzberg at a 7.4 and I’ve got Art Stapleton at a 7.4 and I’ve got Paul Schwartz at a 7.4 and Russ is the running back, Art is the tackle and Paul is a pass rusher, I’ll give him something. What you’re going to do now is if they all have the same value, they’re all in the same conversation, so when the pick comes up and those three characters are all 7.4’s, you talk about what it is and if there is a need at one of those positions, then you take the need. If there is not a need, then you take the best guy, but that’s the conversation. We’re not talking about 25 guys, we’re talking about three guys. Does that make sense to you guys?

Q: I know you laid out the process. If you had to make the pick right now, in your mind and your heart, do you know who you want to take at No. 2?

A: No. I’m being honest.

Q: Is all the information that you got during the visits overkill?

A: It’s not overkill at all, it really isn’t because what is interesting is seeing a guy out of his own element because there is a little less comfort and you can’t know too much about a guy. Remember, you’re bringing him into your locker room, how is he going to handle that, do you want him in your locker room? Who is he coming here with? Is he living alone, does he know how to boil water? How is he going to handle New York City? It is all that stuff and we have to find that out because when you come into the National Football League and so many of these guys are 21, 20 years old when they get out there for the first time and there is some 28, 29 year-old man staring them in the face, they better be ready for that because it’s going to be a rude awakening, and if you don’t bring in the kinds of guys that you know are going to be able to stand up to that, then you’re making a mistake. The 30 visits are not overkill. The amount of contact that we have with these guys over the draft process, all star games, Indianapolis and then their Pro Days workouts and then the 30 guys we can bring in here, it’s very, very meaningful and it’s important.

Q: When you talk about the quarterbacks about being in Ben and Jerry’s and having a lot of different flavors, does that also translate to there is no one that has it all?

A: Not necessarily. They are four different, distinct personalities. But no, not necessarily.

Q: Do you know in your mind right now if you will take a quarterback?

A: Time will tell.

Q: By your own barometer of envisioning the player you take at No. 2 wearing a gold jacket some day, is there a chance that that player is out there, he can help you win now and it’s actually not that hard of a decision?

A: Yes.

Q: You took Christian McCaffrey at No. 8 last year and you described the pick as a no brainer. Could you argue at No. 2 that Saquon is a no brainer to help this team?

A: You could argue that either way.

Q: One of the things that you need from a player is that they have to love football. There are reports that Josh Rosen maybe lacks a desire to play the game. You met with him. What was your impression of him?

A: He wants to play football. He came off as bright, insightful and he wants to play football.

ARTICLES…

Dec 132017
 
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Eli Manning, New York Giants (December 10, 2017)

Eli Manning – © USA TODAY Sports

GIANTS WILL BEGIN INTERVIEWING GM CANDIDATES NEXT WEEK…
New York Giants President/CEO John Mara said on Wednesday that the team will begin interview general manager candidates next week. Jerry Reese was fired by the team last week along with Head Coach Ben McAdoo.

“We have interviews scheduled next week, and we’ll probably be announcing who we’re bringing in,” Mara said.

Mara was asked if he would like quarterback Eli Manning to remain with the team. “Yes,” Mara responded. “But that’s a discussion that we’ll have.”

“We’re in a unique position to take a quarterback (in the 2018 NFL Draft) if we want, but I’m not certain at this point they will be the highest graded players on the board,” Mara said. “That will be a discussion at a later date with the new general manager and new head coach. I’ve watched all of them (on TV) except for (Josh Allen). They’re all impressive.”

When asked about the current season, Mara said, “I’m trying to think of one that was worse. Maybe 1978, maybe ’66. But never one where the expectations were so high and the performance was so poor.”

NEW YORK GIANTS INJURY REPORT…
Wide receiver Roger Lewis (ankle), offensive lineman Justin Pugh (back), defensive tackle Damon Harrison (not injury related), and safety Landon Collins (ankle) did not practice on Wednesday.

Wide receiver Travis Rudolph (hamstring), tight end Rhett Ellison (finger), defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul (finger), linebacker B.J. Goodson (ankle), and cornerback Brandon Dixon (heel/hamstring) practiced on a limited basis.

INTERIM HEAD COACH STEVE SPAGNUOLO…
The transcript of Steve Spagnuolo’s press conference on Wednesday is available in The Corner Forum while the video is available at Giants.com.

THE PLAYERS SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
The New York Giants practice on Thursday at 11:35AM. Interim Head Coach Steve Spagnuolo, Offensive Coordinator Mike Sullivan, Special Teams Coordinator Tom Quinn, and select players will also address the media after practice.

Dec 042017
 
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John Mara, New York Giants (December 4, 2017)

John Mara – © USA TODAY Sports

NEW YORK GIANTS FIRE JERRY REESE AND BEN MCADOO…
The New York Giants fired both Senior Vice President and General Manager Jerry Reese and Head Coach Ben McAdoo on Monday. Reese will be replaced on an interim basis by Assistant General Manager Kevin Abrams, while McAdoo will be replaced on an interim basis by Defensive Coordinator Steve Spagnuolo.

Ernie Accorsi will serve as a consultant in the new general manager search. Accorsi previously served as the team’s assistant general manager (1994-1997) and general manager (1998-2007) until his retirement.

According to various press reports, quarterback Eli Manning will also regain his starting job, although team President John Mara said in today’s press conference announcing the firings that Spagnuolo will decide who starts on Sunday.

Reese had been with the Giants’ organization since 1994, first as a scout (1994-2004), then Director of Player Personnel (2004-2007), and then General Manager (2007-2017). McAdoo was hired by then-Head Coach Tom Coughlin as the team’s new offensive coordinator in 2014. In 2016, he replaced Coughlin as the team’s head coach when Coughlin was fired.

While the Giants have fired many coaches in the team’s history, the Giants have not fired a general manager since 1978. McAdoo’s tenure as head coach lasted 28 regular-season games, marking the shortest stay for a head coach since the pre-Steve Owen era (1930-1953). The last time the Giants fired a coach during the season was 1976, when they parted ways with Bill Arnsparger after an 0-7 start.

McAdoo’s Giants finished 2016 with an 11-5 record and a playoff loss to the Green Bay Packers. However, the Giants are a dreadful 2-10 with four games remaining this season, marking the franchise’s worst start since 1976 when they were also 2-10.

As for Abrams, the Giants’ press release states: “Abrams is the team’s primary negotiator for player contracts, works with the college and pro personnel departments to evaluate players in preparation for the NFL Draft and free agency, and is responsible for managing the Giants’ salary cap, football data analysis, related strategic planning for football operations and coordinating the organization’s compliance with the NFL’s Collective Bargaining Agreement.” Abrams joined the Giants in 1999 to serve as the team’s first salary cap analyst.

The 57-year old Spagnuolo has served two stints as the Giants’ defensive coordinator (2007-2008, 2015-2017). He was the head coach of the St. Louis Rams from 2009-2011, when the team compiled a dreadful 10–38 record.

Transcript of New York Giants President/CEO John Mara’s press conference:

Opening Statement: As you all know by now, I met this morning with Jerry Reese and Ben McAdoo and relieved both of them of their responsibilities. Just to give you the chronology of what happened – Steve Tisch and I met after the game yesterday and agreed to talk this morning, which we did and we agreed that wholesale changes needed to be made to this organization to get us back to the team that we expect to be and we also agreed that it was pointless to wait any longer to make these changes. I met with Jerry Reese at approximately 10:30 a.m. this morning. That’s as difficult a meeting as I’ve ever had. Jerry has been here since 1994. He is homegrown. Started out as a part-time scout and rose all the way through the ranks to become our general manager and to become the general manager for two Super Bowl teams. I thanked him on behalf of Steve and myself for everything he’s done for this organization. I told him that I have no doubt that he will get another shot with another franchise and that at some point in time, I’m going to be answering questions from people about why I got rid of him in the first place.

I then met with Kevin Abrams and asked him to serve as our interim general manager for the rest of the season and if he chooses to be a candidate for the full time position. Kevin agreed to do that. Then met with Ben McAdoo and thanked him for everything he has done for us, for all of his hard work, for the professional matter in which he’s conducted himself. I also feel that he will be a successful head coach at some point in the future. I think he’s going to learn from his experience here and he’ll go on to be a successful head coach. Both of these men – contrary to what their public persona is sometimes – have been complete professionals here. They always make decisions looking out for what they believe is in the best long term interest of the franchise. They never complain about anything. They don’t politic around the office. They communicate well with one another and that’s something that I’m very grateful to both of them for.

I met with Steve Spagnuolo after these meetings. Asked him to serve as the interim head coach and also to be a candidate to be the head coach after the season if he chooses to do so. He agreed to do that. I then met with all the assistant coaches and told them that my expectation is for them to continue to work hard to get these players ready to play in these last four games. I told them I would not put up with any talk in this building about tanking or anything else and I expected us to go out and try to win these games. I expected their best efforts to try to get us to do that. In terms of our general manager search – that starts right away. I have asked Ernie Accorsi to serve as a consultant in this process. He’s agreed to do that. So, we expect to get started right away on that. Ideally, you like to have the general manager in place first before the head coach. That’s not always going to be the case, but that would be the ideal scenario. So with that, I will entertain some of your questions.

Q: What was the final straw for you with Jerry Reese in terms of why you wanted to make the decision now?

A: I don’t think there was any one final straw. I just think that where we are as a franchise right now, you know, we’re 2-10. We’ve kind of been spiraling out of control. I just felt like we needed a complete overhaul. I don’t think there was any one event or one final act to precipitate that.

Q: How much did the Eli Manning situation play into this decision?

A: Really had no effect whatsoever. 2-10 is 2-10 and obviously the public reaction to that was not pleasant, but that really didn’t have any effect on our decision.

Q: Have you spoken to Steve Spagnuolo and does he have any intent to go back to Eli Manning as the starting quarterback?

A: I’ve spoken to Steve and he’s still trying to come to grips with this whole thing. He wants to talk to his offensive staff and he’s going to talk to Kevin (Abrams) and myself. Ultimately, it’s going to be his decision as to who to play at quarterback.

Q: Are you embarrassed in general with what’s happened to the franchise this season?

A: Of course I’m embarrassed. 2-10. There’s no defense for that. Particularly when expectations were so high, and I understand that – listen, we had a ridiculous number of injuries. It’s the first time in my life that I think I sat at a game having to constantly look at the flip card to try and determine who we were playing. But, that being said, we still started out 0-5 with a relatively healthy roster up until that fifth game when all of our wide receivers got hurt. So, yeah, I’m embarrassed about that. That’s one of the reasons I’m standing here.

Q: Are you committing to a division between personnel and coaching or can they cross?

A: My very strong preference is to maintain that traditional separation, but again, I would never say never if the right candidate was there.

Q: Do you regret the decision that was made with Eli Manning and the plan to use Geno Smith? It seemed like you weren’t on the same page.

A: I mean, we were and we weren’t. Ben came up with the plan. I initially signed off on the plan. My hope had been to talk to him to try to have a little more flexibility with it. Not have a hard, fast time when he was going to come out of the game. But, by then Eli rightfully had rejected the notion only starting and playing the half and coming out. We issued a statement and it was just too late at that point.

Q: Did you consider firing Ben McAdoo on Wednesday?

A: No.

Q: What changed between when you put out a statement three weeks ago saying there were not going to be any in-season changes, to now?

A: I changed my mind, we changed our minds. Given all the events that occurred, where we are as a franchise right now. To be honest with you, it became more and more apparent that we were going to have to do something at the end of the season, so we talked after the game and again this morning about, why prolong it any longer? Why not just get it done now? I’m very conscious of the fact that three of our last four games are at home. I’m conscious, having lived through it before, of what the reaction was going to be. Also, gives us somewhat of a tactical advantage, allowing us to start looking at general managers right now rather than waiting until the end of the season.

Q: Were you aware of Ben’s plan to start and play Eli for the first half, and Geno in the second before he actually went and presented it to Eli?

A: That seems to be the focus of everybody’s attention right now. The plan was, Ben was going to talk to Eli and tell him that he was going to start and play the first half and Geno would play the second half.  I signed off on that. But, again, my hope was two things: one, that I was going to speak to Ben and try to get him to be a little bit more flexible about that all. I do not like interfering with coaching decisions about who’s going to play, I’ve never done that before. I also, as I said I think the other day to you guys, was hoping that Eli would be playing so well, it’d be impossible to take him out. In any event, it is where it is and you ought to stop blaming Ben and Jerry on that. If you want to blame me, go ahead and do it. I certainly have the power to overrule them if I wanted to, I chose not to do it.

Q: There are reports that Manning will start this week, are they true?

A: There’s no decision, to my knowledge, that’s been made on that yet. I’d assume [Spagnuolo] will run it by me before he makes that decision.

Q: Do you believe the coaching staff will still plan on giving quarterback Davis Webb an opportunity this season?

A: I mean, I’m hopeful that at some point he gets into the game, but right now, to be honest with you, after all this losing I’m just as focused on trying to win some of these games as anything else.

Q: After an 11-5 season and playoff appearance last season, how did all of this go so wrong so quickly?

A: That’s a good question, one that we’re trying to figure out right now. I was very confident about this roster, as I think most of the people in this room were heading into this season. I thought it was as talented a roster as we’ve had here in a long time. We were coming off an 11-5 season, our defense was basically the same, our offense was supposed to be better. We had added some receivers and a tight end, a couple of tight ends. We were supposed to be better. We got off to a very poor start on offense, our defense did not play as well as they could have and then everybody got hurt. It’s really, and I’ve used this expression, it was the perfect storm. Everything that could have gone wrong has gone wrong so far this season and it’s just one of those things you have to live through and suck it up and make whatever changes you have to make and go on.

Q: How much did Reese not improving the offensive line in the offseason ultimately cost him?

A: Well, it’s more where we are as a team right now. It wasn’t that specifically. We had pretty much the same offensive line last year and even though our offense was not particularly good last year, it was good enough to win 11 games. We thought that group would take a step forward this year and even now, half of them have gotten hurt, it’s just been an impossible situation.

Q: How important is it for the new general manager and head coach to have better communication skills with players and everybody in the building that what you had?

A: Well, first of all, Ben and Jerry Reese communicated very well. And Jerry and I communicated very well together. I usually don’t have that much interaction with the head coach because I like that to be the general manager’, because that’s always been the way I’ve done it. Jerry communicated very well with players. One of the things that I liked about him the most is he’s not afraid to call a player out if he didn’t feel like he was playing up to his potential. And Ben, I thought communicated pretty well. Listen, I’ve spoken to players over the past few weeks, a handful of them, to try to get a handle on whether guys were quitting, or whether they weren’t playing hard and that was not the message that I got back. I think that people felt that they were still playing hard and for most of the season, with an exception of a couple games that I can think of, I thought players did play hard.

Q: Having never been through this process with a general manager, do you feel like it has to be a total front office overhaul, or can a new general manager come in and keep the staff?

A: Well, I think that’s going to be largely up to the new GM. And we did go through this, back in ’07 when Jerry was hired. We kept most of the people and I’m not anticipating there being wholesale changes, but again, that’s largely going to be up to the new general manager.

Q: Would you shy away from hiring a new head coach that doesn’t have head coaching experience?

A: Not necessarily, it just depends on the candidate. I mean, there are a number of new head coaches that are very successful in this league this year, so you can’t shy away from that. If you think you have the right guy, you have to go for it.

Q: There is an expression, the Giant Way. How do you tell the fans that you haven’t lost your way during this season?

A: Listen Bruce, we’ve had an embarrassing season. I think most people that know me know how painful that is to me and know how committed I am in trying to put a winning team back on the field. I know our fans are suffering, but I’m suffering more, I guarantee it. We’ve gotten to the point where we felt like we had to make wholesale changes and that’s what we’ve done here.

Q: Is Steve Spagnuolo a candidate for the head coaching job moving forward or is that dependent on the new general manager?

A: Well, Steve (Tisch) and I have the final say on any head coaching decision, but that’s going to be largely dependent on what the new general manager has to say, yes.

Q: Where do you think it went wrong for Ben after making the playoffs last year?

A: As I said, I just think it ended up being a perfect storm for us. We got off to a bad start this year, particularly on offense. Our defense didn’t play as well as they played last year. We had leads in a few games and last year they would have held them and we would have won the game. They didn’t do that early on and then everybody got hurt. Listen, there were certain guys that on this roster that aren’t playing as well as they should be playing.

Q: Was it just the record or were there other things?

A: Our team isn’t good enough, it’s obviously not good enough. We are 2-10.

Q: Do you expect to hire a new GM before the end of this season?

A: That’s possible. If the right candidate comes along, that’s possible. Obviously if we want to talk to somebody who’s currently employed, we would have to wait.

Q: Do you have names in mind?

A: We have names in mind, but I’m not going to go into the names right now.

Q: Do you regret the decision of hiring Ben?

A: I don’t think so. That’s semantics. I thought that he was the right guy for the job. We were 11-5 last year and everything looked great back in September and now it’s all fallen apart. We will obviously hire the best general manager we can and be very guided on what he has to say.

Q: Three months ago, you thought you’d be headed to the playoffs?

A: Yes. I’ve been around long enough not to get shocked by many things, but I certainly did not see this coming.

Q: Did you think about making this change last week?

A: No.

Q: How do you handle the draft process right now, if you don’t have that new GM in?

A: We will have the GM in long before the draft. Our scouts and Marc Ross our head of scouting, it’s business as usual for them. They’re going to keep doing what they’re doing. But that GM will be in place long before the draft.

Q: Was there any thought in giving Ben another chance?

A: That was certainly something we considered, but at the end of the day, we still felt like wholesale changes needed to be made.

Q: Is it a given that you will hire the general manger before the coach?

A: In all likelihood that will be the way it occurs, but I don’t ever want to say that it’s a definite. But in all likelihood that will be what happens.

Q: How much did the timing of doing it now rather than the end of the season play off of the fan reaction from last week?

A: Listen, I was certainly cognizant of what the fan reaction was likely to be over the last four weeks, but that wasn’t the final determining factor. We just reached a point where we felt, you know what, we’re going to be making these changes probably at the end of the season, so what’s the point in prolonging this any further.

Q: How will your perception of leadership of the men in the locker room change after this example?

A: If I understand your question correctly, listen, I do think we need some more leadership in the locker room for sure. But I think in terms of our priorities as an organization right now, let’s go out and find the best general manager and then let’s take it from there.

Q: How do you look at Odell’s (Beckham) future?

A: I certainly expect him to be a part of this team in the future, but that will be a discussion also with the incoming general manager and the incoming head coach and we’ll make whatever decision we think is appropriate going forward.

Q: What was Jerry and Ben’s reactions? Were they shocked?

A: I don’t think either one of them was shocked. I think they could not have been more professional. They both thanked me for the opportunity. My meeting with Jerry was a little more emotional just because we had a longer history together and because he’s meant so much to this organization. I’ve talked to him a couple times this morning and he thanked me for the opportunity and everything we have done for his family. I thanked him for everything he’s done here and that was not an easy meeting for me and it was not for him either.

The video of Mara’s press conference if available at Giants.com.

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
There is no media availability to the New York Giants on Tuesday. The players return to practice on Wednesday in preparation for Sunday’s home game against the Dallas Cowboys.

Oct 082017
 
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Odell Beckham, New York Giants (October 8, 2017)

Odell Beckham – © USA TODAY Sports

LOS ANGELES CHARGERS 27 – NEW YORK GIANTS 22…
It just keeps getting worse and worse for the New York Giants, who lost their fifth consecutive game on Sunday, falling 27-22 to the Los Angeles Chargers at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Giants also lost four of their five active wide receivers to injury as Odell Beckham (fractured ankle), Sterling Shepard (ankle), Brandon Marshall (sprained ankle), and Dwayne Harris (fractured foot) left the game and did not return.

The injuries to Beckham and Marshall looked very serious. The Giants are officially reporting that Beckham fractured his ankle. ESPN is reporting that Beckham may undergo surgery as early as today or tomorrow. The NFL Network is reporting that the team believes Beckham broke his fibula. He will need to undergo an MRI to ascertain any ligament damage.

The game itself was sloppy and difficult to watch. The Giants squandered a 9-0 1st-quarter lead, and yet another 4th-quarter lead as the team was up 22-17 late in the contest.

After the teams exchanged punts to start the game, New York went up 2-0 as a botched snap by the Chargers was knocked out of the end zone for a safety. After both teams punted again, the Giants went up 9-0 on Orleans Darkwa’s 23-yard touchdown run, capping a 5-play, 64-yard drive. The play marked the first time a Giants’ running back scored a rushing touchdown this year. But the Chargers overtook the Giants on the scoreboard before halftime with an 8-play, 77-yard touchdown drive and a 12-play, 49-yard field goal drive. Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers threw a 6-yard touchdown pass to running back Melvin Gordon and place kicker Nick Novak kicked a 20-yard field goal. The Giants twice squandered excellent field position in the 2nd quarter – starting one drive at their own 45 and another at the Chargers 39-yard line – coming up with no further points in the first half.

The Giants went three-and-out to start the 3rd quarter. The Chargers drove to the Giants’ 14-yard line, but Rivers’ 3rd-and-7 pass was intercepted by safety Darian Thompson in the end zone. It was the first pass the Giants have picked off all season. The Giants then re-gained the lead on a 9-play, 80-yard effort, culminating with a perfect quarterback Eli Manning 29-yard touchdown strike to wide receiver Roger Lewis. Giants 16 – Chargers 10.

But the defense could not hold the lead as the Chargers responded with a 12-play, 92-yard drive that ended with a 25-yard touchdown pass from Rivers to tight end Hunter Henry. It only took five plays (and 75 yards) for the Giants to move ahead again. Under duress, Manning found a wide-open Beckham for a 48-yard score. After a delay-of-game penalty, the Giants’ 2-point conversion attempt failed and New York led 22-17 with 13:31 to go in the game.

After both teams exchanged punts, the Chargers got the ball back again with nine minutes to play. Los Angeles moved the ball 48 yards in 11 plays to set up a successful 31-yard field with just under five minutes to go. Then came disaster. On 2nd-and-7, Manning’s high slant pass to Beckham fell incomplete. It was on this play where Beckham got seriously injured. On the very next snap, Manning was sacked and fumbled the ball away at the New York 11-yard line. On 3rd-and-9, Rivers found Gordon again out of the backfield for a 10-yard score. The Chargers now led 27-22 with three minutes to play.

However, by this point the Giants were down to only one wide receiver – Roger Lewis. The offensive line, which struggled all day in pass protection, allowing five sacks, imploded on the last possession with two penalties. Manning’s desperate 4th-and-10 pass from the Chargers’ 48-yard line was intercepted with less than 50 seconds to play. Game over.

The erratic Manning finished the game 21-of-36 for 225 yards, two touchdowns, 1 interception, and 1 lost fumble. The only player with over 30 yards receiving was Beckham with 5 catches for 97 yards. Against Los Angeles’ 31st-ranked run defense, the Giants had their best rushing game of the season with Orleans Darkwa rushing for 69 yards on eight carries and Wayne Gallman rushing for 57 yards on 11 carries.

Defensively, the Giants allowed 382 total net yards, including 124 yards rushing and 258 yards passing. The Giants have now allowed 100 yards rushing or more in five consecutive games to start the season. The Giants only forced one turnover and did not sack Rivers.

Video highlights/lowlights are available at Giants.com.

INACTIVE LIST AND INJURY REPORT…
Inactive for the game were running back Paul Perkins (ribs), center Weston Richburg (concussion), defensive end Olivier Vernon (ankle), quarterback Davis Webb, tight end Matt LaCosse, defensive tackle Robert Thomas, and cornerback Michael Hunter.

Wide receivers Odell Beckham (fractured ankle), Sterling Shepard (ankle), Brandon Marshall (sprained ankle), and Dwayne Harris (fractured foot) left the game with injuries and did not return. A number of Giants were in and out of the line-up with injuries including cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, linebacker Jonathan Casillas (burner), safety Landon Collins, and running back Orleans Darkwa (lower body – calf?).

Quarterback Eli Manning also had x-rays taken on his neck, but they were negative.

POST-GAME REACTION…
Transcripts and video clips of post-game media sessions with Head Coach Ben McAdoo and the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

POST-GAME NOTES…
The Giants fell to 0-5 for only the fourth time in franchise history. They lost their first nine games in 1976, their first five in 1987 (three of them strike-replacement games), and their first six in 2013. In those seasons, they finished, respectively, 3-11, 6-9, and 7-0. The Giants were also winless through their first five games in 1947 (when they started 0-7-2) and 1966 (0-4-1).

The Chargers broke a nine-game losing streak dating back to last season. The Giants lost their fourth consecutive game to the Chargers, and now trail in the all-time series, 7-5.

Quarterback Eli Manning’s ninth pass attempt was the 7,000th of his career. He is the seventh quarterback in history to throw at least 7,000 regular-season passes.

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
Head Coach Ben McAdoo will address the media by conference call Monday afternoon.

Nov 152016
 
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Landon Collins, New York Giants (November 14, 2016)

Landon Collins – © USA TODAY Sports Images

NEW YORK GIANTS 21 – CINCINNATI BENGALS 20…
The New York Giants defeated the Cincinnati Bengals 21-20 on Monday night at MetLife Stadium. With the victory, the Giants improved their overall record to 6-3.

The Giants out-gained the Bengals in first downs (23 to 12), total offensive plays (72 to 55), total net yards (351 to 264), net yards rushing (122 to 78), and net yards passing (229 to 186). The Bengals were held to 2-of-11 (18 percent) on 3rd down conversion attempts.

Both teams scored touchdowns on their opening drives. The Giants first drove 80 yards in eight plays. Quarterback Eli Manning started this possession off with a 25-yard pass to tight end Will Tye and finished it with a 10-yard touchdown pass to tight end Jerell Adams. But the Bengals quickly tied the game in three plays, with the biggest being a 71-yard pass from quarterback Andy Dalton to tight end Tyler Eifert. Dalton finished the possession off with a 13-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver A.J. Green. The game was tied at 7-7.

The next four Giants possessions ended with two punts, a turnover on downs, and an interception. The Bengals punted three times in a row before Manning’s interception. The turnover set up Cincinnati at the Giants 7-yard line. The defense held and forced a 25-yard field goal. New York’s offense then responded with an 8-play, 75-yard drive that culminated with a 10-yard touchdown pass from Manning to wide receiver Odell Beckham, Jr. to give the Giants a 14-10 lead at the half.

The Bengals returned the opening kickoff of the 3rd quarter 84 yards to the Giants 13-yard line. Two plays later, running back Jeremy Hill scored from nine yards out as the Bengals regained the lead 17-14. After a three-and-out by the Giants offense, Cincinnati added to their advantage by putting together a 7-play, 41-yard drive that set up a successful 38-yard field goal. The Bengals now led 20-14.

Both teams exchanged punts on their next two possessions. Late in the 3rd quarter and early in the 4th quarter, the Giants put together their game-winning drive after forcing the Bengals to punt from deep in their own territory. Starting on the Cincinnati 47-yard line, the Giants drove to the Bengals 3-yard line where they faced 4th-and-goal. Head Coach Ben McAdoo decided to go for it and was rewarded when Manning found wide receiver Sterling Shepard for the score. Giants 21 – Bengals 20.

Both teams then exchanged interceptions. First, safety Landon Collins picked off Dalton. Then Manning gave the ball right back to the Bengals on the very next play. But New York’s defense forced a three-and-out. Both teams exchanged punts before the Giants ran out the final three minutes of the game.

Offensively, Manning finished the game 28-of-44 for 240 yards, 3 touchdowns, and 2 interceptions. His leading receivers were Beckham (10 catches for 97 yards and a touchdown), Tye (5 catches for 53 yards), and Shepard (5 catches for 42 yards and a touchdown). Running back Rashad Jennings rushed for 87 yards on 15 carries and running back Paul Perkins chipped in with 31 yards on nine carries.

Defensively, defensive end Olivier Vernon led the team with 10 tackles, 1 sack, and 2 tackles for losses. Defensive tackle Robert Thomas had one sack and defensive tackle Damon Harrison and linebacker Jonathan Casillas had half-sacks. Collins had the Giants lone turnover with his interception.

Video highlights/lowlights are available at Giants.com.

INACTIVE LIST AND INJURY REPORT…
Inactive for the game were wide receiver Victor Cruz (ankle), left guard Justin Pugh (knee), defensive end Kerry Wynn (concussion), cornerback Leon Hall, offensive tackle Will Beatty, linebacker Deontae Skinner, and quarterback Josh Johnson.

Left guard Brett Jones strained his calf in the 1st quarter and did not return. He was replaced by Marshall Newhouse. Wide receiver/returner Dwayne Harris left the game with a toe injury and did not play in the second half.

POST-GAME REACTION…
Transcripts and video clips of post-game media sessions with Head Coach Ben McAdoo and the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

POST-GAME NOTES…
QB Eli Manning was credited with his 33rd fourth-quarter, game-winning drive (leading the Giants to victories in games in which they trailed or were tied in the fourth quarter).

WR Odell Beckham set the NFL record for the fewest number of games (36) to reach 3,500 receiving yards.

S Landon Collins has four interceptions in his last three games.

TOM COUGHLIN, ERNIE ACCORSI, JUSTIN TUCK INDUCTED INTO RING OF HONOR…
Former New York Giants Head Coach Tom Coughlin (2004-2015), General Manager Ernie Accorsi (1998-2007), and defensive end Justin Tuck (2005-2013) were officially inducted into the team’s Ring of Honor at halftime during Monday night’s game against the Cincinnati Bengals. A video of the ceremony is available at Giants.com.

ARTICLES…

Nov 082016
 
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Tom Coughlin, New York Giants (February 6, 2012)

Tom Coughlin – © USA TODAY Sports Images

TOM COUGHLIN, ERNIE ACCORSI, JUSTIN TUCK TO BE INDUCTED IN RING OF HONOR…
The New York Giants have announced that former Giants Head Coach Tom Coughlin (2004-2015), General Manager Ernie Accorsi (1998-2007), and defensive end Justin Tuck (2005-2013) will be inducted into the team’s Ring of Honor at halftime during Monday night’s game against the Cincinnati Bengals.

The following are the transcripts of today’s conference call sessions with each inductee:

To see a list of who is already in the Ring of Honor, see the New York Giants Ring of Honor section of the website.

GIANTS LOSING GEREMY DAVIS OFF OF PRATICE SQUAD?…
ESPN is reporting that an unidentified team will be signing New York Giants wide receiver Geremy Davis off of the team’s Practice Squad. Davis was drafted in the 6th round of the 2015 NFL Draft by the Giants. He played in 10 games with no starts as a rookie and finished the season with only two catches for 21 yards.

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
Player interviews will be held on Wednesday and the team will return to practice on Thursday.

Nov 072016
 
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Ben McAdoo, New York Giants (November 6, 2016)

Ben McAdoo – © USA TODAY Sports Images

MONDAY BEN MCADOO CONFERENCE CALL…
New York Giants Head Coach Ben McAdoo addressed the media by conference call on Monday to discuss the team’s 28-23 victory over the Philadelphia Eagles:

McAdoo: Hit the defense first. Got off to a fast start. Two INT’s that led to two offensive touchdowns. We finished strong on a sudden change of possession. Showed high character there at the end of the ball game. Situational football was tremendous. The last thing is holding the quarterback to four carries and minus-four yards in the rushing department. What we need to work on, cut down the explosive plays. The details, execution and consistency needs to improve there. Set the tone in the first series of the second half.

Offensively, I think we took advantage of the two turnovers in the first quarter. Put two touchdowns on the board there. We were 4-for-4 in the shot zone, the high green zone, the fringe and the low green zone. We answered Philly’s touchdown to open the second half with one of our own. Despite all the negativity out there in the run game, we made some progress there late in the second half. What we need to work on, we had three pre-snap penalties, three batted balls. We need to finish the game in four-minute. We had a chance to end the game and we need to do that. We had eight opportunities to execute and make plays that were out there that could’ve had a positive impact on the game for us and we came up short. We need to take advantage of those opportunities.

Special teams, I think JPP going in and blocking the field goal at the end of the first half was huge. He used great technique there. He made a great play for us in the ball game. What we need to work on, we knew going in that we couldn’t give 43 (Darren Sproles) a seam on punt return. It was a combination of a bunch of things but hang to distance and being firm and protective on the releases. The gunners being singled up, they need to win there. In the four-minute, the kickoff decision was a poor decision. We had seven up. We need to stay in the end zone with the ball there. With that, we’ll open it up.

Q: You also incorporated a little bit more Roger Lewis and Dwayne Harris, how did that work out for you?

A: I thought it was good. I think it’s always good to get everyone involved. Those are two guys that have earned some opportunities. They’ve been practicing hard. Look good in practice and have earned reps. We’re going to give them some opportunities as long as they keep earning reps and working hard on the practice field and in games.

Q: What did Roger Lewis bring to the offense that you wanted to incorporate?

A: He’s a young and improving player. He’s taking advantage of his special teams opportunities. He needs to continue to do that. As long as he continues to produce the way he has been producing on special teams and improving on offense, he will get the opportunity to play.

Q: How is Justin Pugh and how do you think Brett Jones did?

A: Justin has a knee sprain. He’s going to miss a little bit of time. I thought Jonesie did a nice job when he went in there. He played physical. He’s been playing more center for us but was ready to go in the ballgame at guard.

Q: Why did you go with Brett rather than opt to move Bobby Hart in there?

A: I just think for where we are in the season and in the ballgame, that was the best fit for us at the time.

Q: How did Jerell Adams do? He and Will Tye looked to do a better job.

A: Tye definitely had some wiggle after the catch. We knew that from last year. He showed up in a positive way for us yesterday in that regard. Jerell did a nice job for us out there. He did have a pre-snap penalty which we have to eliminate, but he made some progress, too.

Q: Any update on Victor Cruz and Justin Pugh?

A: Justin is going to miss some time. I don’t know how long at this point, but he’s going to miss a little bit of time. Victor is scheduled to get an MRI today.

Q: Will you stick with Brett Jones at guard as long as Justin is out?

A: We’ll take a look at all of our options.

Q: Why did you decide to not dress Leon Hall yesterday?

A: It’s just the way it shook out. We wanted to get three safeties up. True safeties up. It came down to special teams. When you have a lot of healthy bodies you have to make some tough decisions. Certainly Leon has played some good football for us. We’re confident in Leon and what he brings to the table.

Q: You worked Devon Kennard inside for the first time yesterday. What went into that decision and how did he look?

A: We did a couple of different things and how to use our personnel. I think it’s a way to help get Devon some reps. They’re tough to come by in base defense these days. It was an opportunity to move him around a little bit and give us some opportunities.

Q: The way that you used so much personnel, is that an organizational decision or just the coaching staff?

A: That’s how I grew up in this business, to get young players and everyone involved in game days that is up. Give them all the support they need to be successful. The way to get young players acclimated to the varsity team is to get them out there and get them going. When the snaps get to December and January, it’s not too big for them. It’s not the first time they’re on the field.

Q: A day later, what light can you shed on the ball that was ruled an interception on the Odell play in the middle?

A: We’re going to turn it into the league and really see what they have to say about it. I think it’s one of those calls that it depends on where you start. I think it’s a tough one to overturn either way. If it’s incomplete, I think it stays incomplete. If it’s a completion, I think it stays a completion. The way they ruled it as an interception, once you go look at it, I think it stays an interception. It’s a hard one to overturn. Regardless. I thought we caught the ball and went to the ground. They came away with the ball. The starting point is probably going to be the ending point there.

Q: What did Paul Perkins bring to the running game?

A: We balanced up the touches there a little bit. It’s tough to give one guy, feature one guy in the running game these days. You need a couple of guys that can carry the ball for you. He had some good opportunities in there. Some clean looks. On the toss crack, he did a nice job finding the seam. He kept his balance and had a nice run there at the end.

Q: Bobby Rainey played less with Perkins and Rashad Jennings splitting the snaps. Was that injury related?

A: We took everything into consideration there. A little bit of everything.

Q: Victor had an X-ray yesterday, what did that show? How serious is the Ryan Nassib injury?

A: Victor is going to get an MRI. He has one scheduled today so we’ll know more after the MRI. Ryan will be limited this week.

Q: What did you think of Keenan Robinson, especially in defensing the screen game?

A: Keenan has been very active for us. His agility has allowed him to cover a lot of ground for us in the passing game. He had some good production to go along with it.

Q: What did you think of using Newhouse as the sixth offensive lineman?

A: I think Marshall did a nice job in there. He used good technique and fundamentals. He was productive when he had his opportunities.

Q: Is that something you can use more?

A: It’s something we will take a look at week in and week out. See if we can get anything out of it.

Q: Is there anything you do with young guys to track their progress?

A: No websites. We watch the film and we grade our players in practice and in games. We continue to coach them and develop them. The better they do and the more they respond to the coaching, the more opportunities they’ll get.

Q: When you play young guys, you have to expect mistakes. How do you weigh the mistakes made by young guys versus giving them experience?

A: You have to acclimate them early. You can’t wait until December. You have to get them opportunities to compete in practice and get them in there in games. They have to earn the opportunity. They don’t just get to play. They have to earn that opportunity and prove that they’re trustworthy and accountable. I think it does a lot for your team. It gives 46 guys an opportunity to play. I think it helps the veterans and breathes some life in the veterans in the long season. They have young guys that are champing at the bit. They bring excitement and energy. It’s fun to see the young guys have success.

Q: Does Eli Apple have to earn back playing time?

A: We’re going to dust Eli off, put him back out there. He’s going to get better and learn from it.

Q: Is Shane Vereen ready to practice?

A: Haven’t had those conversations yet.

Q: Is there a chance he comes back this year?

A: Haven’t had those conversations yet.

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
The players will be off on Tuesday. Player interviews will be held on Wednesday and the team will return to practice on Thursday. Conference calls with 2016 Ring of Honor inductees Tom Coughlin, Ernie Accorsi and Justin Tuck will be held on Tuesday.

Jul 272016
 
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Hakeem Nicks, New York Giants (January 3, 2016)

Hakeem Nicks – © USA TODAY Sports Images

GIANTS REPORT TO CAMP ON THURSDAY…
New York Giants players report to summer training camp on Thursday. The first training camp practice will occur on Friday. (A complete schedule is available at Giants.com). Head Coach Ben McAdoo and a number of players will address the press on Thursday.

HAKEEM NICKS SIGNS WITH SAINTS…
New York Giants unrestricted free agent wide receiver Hakeem Nicks has signed a 1-year contract with the New Orleans Saints.

Desperate for veteran wide receiver help, the Giants signed then 27-year old Hakeem Nicks off of the street in November 2015. Unfortunately, the results were not good. Nicks played in six games with two starts, but finished with only seven catches for 54 yards. It’s been a precipitous decline for Nicks ever since his stellar 2010 and 2011 seasons when he compiled 155 catches for 2,244 yards and 18 touchdowns in 28 regular-season games.

Nicks was originally drafted by the Giants in the 1st round of the 2009 NFL Draft. After two disappointing seasons in 2012 and 2013 when Nicks’ production fell to 109 passes for 1,588 yards and three touchdowns in 28 regular-season games, Nicks departed in free agency for the Indianapolis Colts. Nicks’ production in Indianapolis was disappointing too as he caught 38 passes for 405 yards and four touchdowns. He tried to catch on with the Tennessee Titans in training camp in 2015 but did not make the team. Nicks’ demise has largely been attributed to injuries, including compartment syndrome in his lower right leg in 2010 as well as a broken right foot and a poster cruciate ligament (PCL) tear in 2012.

DANIEL FELLS RETIRES…
Although not officially announced, it appears New York Giants tight end Daniel Fells has retired. Fells was placed on Injured Reserve in October 2015 after multiple career-threatening surgeries were required to address a life-threatening staph infection that developed in an injured ankle. He only played in two games in 2015 and finished with six catches for 60 yards.

Fells said on his Instagram account, “Although playing the game is no longer in the cards for me I’m grateful for the 10 year career that I was blessed to experience.”

Fells was originally signed as an undrafted rookie free agent by the Atlanta Falcons after the 2006 NFL Draft. He has spent time with the Falcons, Raiders, Buccaneers, Rams, Broncos, and Patriots. The Giants signed Fells to a reserve/future contract in January 2014. He played in all 16 games for the Giants in 2014 with nine starts, accruing 16 catches for 188 yards and four touchdowns.

TOM COUGHLIN ACCEPTS JOB WITH NFL…
According to press report, former New York Giants Head Coach Tom Coughlin has accepted a full-time position with the NFL’s football operations department. His exact role has yet to be announced by the League. Coughlin was de facto fired in January by the Giants after serving with the team since 2004.

GIANTS.COM INTERVIEWS…
Video clips of exclusive interviews with the following coaches and players are available at Giants.com:

  • Offensive Coordinator Mike Sullivan (Video)
  • Special Teams Coordinator Tom Quinn (Video)
  • TE Will Tye (Video)
  • DE Olivier Vernon (Video)
  • DT Damon Harrison (Video)

GIANTS.COM PLAYER Q&As…
Transcripts of Q&A sessions with the following players are available at Giants.com:

ARTICLES…

This picture of me and my baby girl was taken a little over a year ago at Quest Diagnostic. I wish I was heading into battle with my brothers as Training Camp starts up this week but I also believe that everything happens for a reason. Although playing the game is no longer in the cards for me I'm grateful for the 10 year career that I was blessed to experience. Thank you all for the phone calls, text messages, emails and well wishes that I've gotten over the last few months. I'm working hard to accept my physical limitations and the mental struggles that go along with them. I know that I'm lucky to be alive so I'm determined to make the most of everyday that I have. Looking forward to cheering for my G-men and all of my former teammates on different teams around the nation this year #onceagiantalwaysagiant

A photo posted by Daniel Fells (@danielfells85) on

Jul 192016
 
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Tom Coughlin, New York Giants (February 5, 2012)

Tom Coughlin – © USA TODAY Sports Images

ERNIE ACCORSI, TOM COUGHLIN, JUSTIN TUCK TO RING OF HONOR…
The New York Giants have announced that Ernie Accorsi, Tom Coughlin, and Justin Tuck will be added to the team’s “Ring of Honor” during a halftime ceremony at the Giants-Bengals at MetLife Stadium on November 14.

The addition of these three will bring to 42 the number of team icons so honored. For a complete list, see the Ring of Honor section of the website.

Accorsi served at the Giants’ Assistant General Manager from 1994-1997 and General Manager from 1998-2006.

Coughlin served as the Giants’ wide receivers coach from 1988-1990 and head coach from 2004-2015. Coughlin helped lead the Giants to two NFL titles (2007 and 2011). He finished with 102-90 regular-season record (second most victories in franchise history) and an 8-3 post-season record (tied with Bill Parcells).

Tuck was a defensive end for the team from 2005-2015. Tuck was voted to the Pro Bowl twice and served as a team captain four times, finishing with 60.5 sacks in his Giants’ career.

“When you start working in the National Football League, this is not something you would ever dream could happen,” Accorsi said. “I’ve seen these in different stadiums, and when you see all the great players and coaches up there, it’s not something I ever thought could happen. I can’t even put into words what an honor it is, especially with this franchise. It’s overwhelming that someone who started at the bottom in this league could end up with some of the names up there, like Lawrence Taylor and Frank Gifford. It’s just incredible for me to get this.”

“It was a great privilege to be the 16th head coach of the New York Giants, and it’s a privilege and a tremendous honor to be a part of those great names in Giant folklore that are in the Ring of Honor,” Coughlin said. “It’s something Judy (his wife), my family and I very much appreciate. The New York Giants, to me, is the greatest franchise in the history of the NFL. We recognize the long history of the Giants and the greatest city in the world, the tremendous coaches and players that have represented the Giants over the years. It’s a great honor to be included in the same breath with some of these prestigious former players and coaches.”

“It’s a great honor,” Tuck said. “Anytime something like this is bestowed upon a person, you have to consider all the other guys up there, all the people that have paved the way for a small-town kid like me to have the opportunity to be put up in the rafters by what I consider to be the greatest football franchise there is. I don’t think it’s dawned on me yet how big a deal it is, but I’m sure that night there will be some emotions that come out and be very visible. I’m very, very excited about it.”

NFL NETWORK INTERVIEW WITH RASHAD JENNINGS…
The video and transcript of an NFL Network interview with running back Rashad Jennings are available at Giants.com.

GIANTS.COM PLAYER INTERVIEWS…
Video clips of exclusive interviews with the following players are available at Giants.com:

  • QB Eli Manning (Video)
  • CB Janoris Jenkins (Video)
  • S Landon Collins (Video)

GIANTS.COM PLAYER Q&As…
Transcripts of Q&A sessions with the following players are available at Giants.com:

ARTICLES…