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Bradley Chubb, North Carolina State Wolfpack (November 18, 2017)

Bradley Chubb – © USA TODAY Sports

New York Giants 2018 NFL Draft Preview: Edge Rushers

by BigBlueInteractive.com Contributor Sy’56

1 – Bradley Chubb – NC State – 6’4/269

Grade: 86

Strong Points:

-Violent, aggressive, and downright nasty player that loves the physical game
-Far along and well developed techniques against the run and pass
-Every down threat

Weak Points:

-Quick twitch when moving upfield won’t scare NFL pass blockers
-Loses focus and track of his assignments
-Needs to harness his emotions and use them for his advantage

Summary:

Three year starter. The top edge defender in this class and while some may say it is a result of a lack of top end talent in the group overall, it’s hard not to label Chubb a stud. After gaining 25 pounds between the 2015 and 2016 season, Chubb went on to amass 46.5 TFL and 20 sacks. If you want to alter the toughness as a defense, you can start with a guy like this. He walks the line of too dirty and dirty enough like Suh was in college, but coaches rave about his leadership and fire. Chubb will very much be in the picture for NYG, whether it is at #2 overall or back a few spots.

NFL Comparison: Joey Bosa / LAC

2 – Kemoko Turay – Rutgers – 6’5/253

Grade: 83

Strong Points:

-Easy burst off the line, puts a blocker on his heels
-Translates speed to power, violent punch that will get a blocker off balance
-Leverage comes easy for him with chest up and a long reach

Weak Points

-Has battled, and continues to battle, injuries
-Slow to pick up schemes and responsibilities
-Needs more core strength to maintain ground against power blocks

Summary:

Fifth year senior. Began his career off with a Freshman All American season in 2014, recording 7.5 sacks. He then was on and off the field via coaching decisions and injuries. From what I was told, he isn’t the brightest player and the coaches didn’t trust him in certain roles. Others will say the coaches there just didn’t know what they were doing with him. Whatever the case, Turay has enormous upside at a premium position. He is worth the gamble because of that ceiling. Watching the discomfort he gives pass blockers via physical pop and explosion can be thrown in to an NFL role right now. Pair him up with the right situation and you might have a top10 caliber pass rusher that can be had in round 2.

NFL Comparison: Whitney Mercilus / HOU

3 – Marcus Davenport – UTSA – 6’6/254

Grade: 82

Strong Points:

-A frame that will make coaches and scouts drool
-Has plenty of pop and violence in his game, finishes hard
-Bends easily, flexibility throughout, keeping his pad level low

Weak Points:

-Needs more staying power, lacks NFL core strength
-Lacks urgency in some situations, gives up too easily
-Very dependent on the initial movement, lacks secondary moves

Summary:

A big time athlete in 3 sports in high school, Davenport was overlooked on the national scouting scene. He started to break out in 2016, showing glimpses of top tier movement with a frame that gets all talent evaluators excited. He went on to finish with 17 TFL and 8.5 sacks in 2017 in addition to being one of the top performers at the combine and Senior Bowl, respectively. Davenport doesn’t get the elite grade from me like some have on him, as I think his power game and lack of ability to get off blocks will be an issue early on. He will have to work his butt off and play more aggressive at the point of attack. If those two parts of his game evolve, he can be a good one.

NFL Comparison: Danielle Hunter / MIN

4- Harold Landry – Boston College – 6’2/252

Grade: 81

Strong Points:

-Elite movement when it comes to both burst and change of direction
-Plays low and fast, tough for a blocker to get a hold of
-Excellent anticipation of the snap, gets the head start

Weak Points:

-Underachieved in 2017, struggled through injuries and lack of playing time
-Effort switch goes off and on too often
-Struggles against the run that goes right at him

Summary:

Could have come out last year and been a top 15 pick after his 22 TFL/16.5 sack season. He was the guy in this class that was supposed to be the elite pass rusher but a few injuries and a coaching staff that mishandled him in my opinion made 2017 a down year. Landry might not be an every down threat because of his struggle in the power game, but pass rushers like this are still sought after. His burst, agility, and leverage are traits that a blocker has a hard time dealing with. I think the NYG scheme may be a perfect fit for him and if he is there in the 2nd round, I wouldn’t be surprised one bit to see them bite.

5 – Lorenzo Carter – Georgia – 6’5/250

Grade: 78

Strong Points:

-Physically gifted with a rare combination of speed, height, length, and speed
-Progressed throughout the 2017 season as much as any defender in the class
-Versatile skill set that can be used in multiple roles, in space and in the trenches

Weak Points:

-Still a step behind mentally when it comes to reading defenses and reacting
-Hesitant when taking on blocks
-High hipped, too much of a straight line athlete

Summary:

A former 5 star recruit that earned the newcomer of the year award for UGA in 2014, Carter simply took awhile to blossom. He has always been packed with talent and ability, but the football sense wasn’t quite clicking for him until 2017. He was a situational guy, a good edge rusher with burst and long strides that would eat up a 5-10 yard window in a blink. But his role expanded in 2017 and he showed the kind of versatility and overall progress that could end up getting his name called in the 1st round. The NFL loves tools paired with a good attitude, and that he has. Carter is a little to manufactured for me, meaning he is only a top tier player when the role is simple and he can burst in to a straight line. He comes back down to earth when the game is quickly changing directions and quality reads need to be made. I love the upside here, but he is a 3rd round-only option for NYG in my book.

NFL Comparison: Connor Barwin / FA

6 – Sam Hubbard – Ohio State – 6’5/270

Grade: 77

Strong Points:

-Power presence against run is elite, he wins the power battle almost always
-Developed technique and approach, very detail-attentive
-Plays within the scheme, rarely caught out of position

Weak Points:

-Athletically limited, burst and agility are average at best
-Struggles to get movement as a bull rusher, gets locked up
-Never reached the production level that was projected of him

Summary:

Fourth year junior entry. Was being labeled the next Joey Bosa but he never came close to that level. Hubbard was overrated by the national spotlight for a tad, but I still think he has a very solid role in the NFL in the right scheme. He plays the run well, very aware and savvy, and will finish when he gets to the ball. Hubbard’s ceiling is limited, but he is a safe and reliable edge player that will get the job done as long as his role is right.

NFL Comparison: Jordan Jenkins / NYJ

7 – Kylie Fitts – Utah – 6’4/263

Grade: 76

Strong Points:

-Violent off the snap, plays aggressive and powerful
-Really quick burst and light footed
-Can turn the edge at a fast rate with good pad level

Weak Points:

-Has been marred by injuries throughout his career
-Can be stood up too easily by a strong, low blocker
-Moved backward by the power run block and double team too easily

Summary:

Fifth year senior. Spent a year at UCLA before transferring to Utah. Missed most of 2016 with a foot injury and was hampered by multiple injuries in 2017. He got a green light in his medicals at the combine and I think this might be one of the best day 2/3 values in the draft. Fitts plays with the quick twitch violence that can factor off the edge. There are a lot of physical traits to like here and if he can actually stay on the field for a full year for the first time since 2015, he could evolve in to a first round caliber talent.

NFL Comparison: Derrick Morgan / TEN

8 – Jalyn Holmes – Ohio State – 6’5/283

Grade: 75

Strong Points:

-Has the NFL ready frame and power presence right now
-Flashes an array of developed rush moves
-When the light is on, his impact is near top notch when he punches the blocker

¬Weak Points:

-Inconsistent all around when it comes to production and effort
-Urgency and quick reactions aren’t there
-Pad level gets too high, makes him an easy target

Summary:

Senior that struggled to get a ton of playing time because of the overcrowded defensive line at OSU. Holmes gets people excited because of what he would flash on a weekly to bi-weekly basis. His size and short area burst is enough to send power blockers back a couple steps. He has also shown the ability to rip under blockers and make plays in the backfield. I think if he played a little lighter, 10-15 pounds, he could be a terror. He could break out in the NFL if he ever gets more consistent snaps, but at the same time his intensity needs to be there no matter what when his number is called, something I didn’t always see in college.

NFL Comparison: Cameron Jordan / NO

9 – Uchenna Nwosu – USC – 6’2/251

Grade: 76

Strong Points:

-NFL caliber technique from head to toe
-Smart, aware player that understands situations and his role
-High effort hustler, is found all over the place

Weak Points:

-Doesn’t jump off the screen when it comes to speed and burst
-Undersized and it shows up when a quality blocker gets his hands inside
-Doesn’t move guys to create a new line of scrimmage

Summary:

Two year starter. A coach’s favorite because of his attention to detail when it comes to techniques and awareness. Plays his butt off each week. Nwosu needs to be watched week after week to truly appreciate what he is. He won’t impress anyone with his tools, although he is a solid athlete with length and easy leverage. When it comes to burst and power presence, he falls just short of what you want in an every down starter. I do think he will find a role and produce at a good enough level to warrant a day 2 pick, but it will be hard to get a lot out of him play after play.

NFL Comparison: Kyle Van Noy / NE

10 – Arden Key – LSU – 6’5/238

Grade: 75

Strong Points:

-Explosive first step, can get his hands on the blocker in a hurry
-Good flexibility, can make himself small as he bends the edge sharp
-Rangy defender, swallows a lot of space in a blink

Weak Points:

-Effort and passion for the game are rightfully in question
-Inconsistent pad level, gets too high and easily rendered ineffective
-Doesn’t use a wide variety of rush moves, techniques are behind

Summary:

Junior entry. At this time last year, everyone had Key as a probable future top 10 pick after his 12 sack breakout season. The offseason leading up to the 2017 season wasn’t kind to Key, as he recovered from a couple of injuries and started to question if he wanted to play anymore. He actually left the team for a bit and even though he returned, he was a shell of his former self. He did flash, however. Key has the tools when it comes to size and burst, but doesn’t have much power or strength to work with yet. He is someone could look at round 3 or 4 and see a project that could be worth trying for, but I suspect he will be gone way before then.

NFL Comparison: Chandler Jones / ARI

11 – Peter Kalambayi – Stanford – 6’3/252

Grade: 75

Strong Points:

-Well developed frame, wiry strong with plenty of functional quick twitch
-Fast in the open field, can factor in space
-Power on the move is there, he is violent with blockers

Weak Points:

-Reaction speed isn’t there, often late on reads
-Instincts are in question, doesn’t feel the action before it happens
-Burst up the edge as a pass rusher won’t scare tackles

Summary:

Fifth year senior and two time team captain. Kalambayi is one of my sleepers for the position. He moves really well for a guy his size. Kalambayi is a hard worker on the field that can make his presence felt on contact with developed power from his lower body. I think his best football is ahead of him and he is entering the league at the right time for a mid round value grab.

12 – Tyquan Lewis – Ohio State – 6’3/269

Grade: 74

Strong Points:

-Power game is already pro caliber, he can create a new line of scrimmage
-Plays hard, loves to be physical with his hands
-Plays low, plenty of knee bend and will get in to the blocker fast

Weak Points

-Lacks variety as a pass rusher, it is bull rush or bust
-Takes a lot of energy for him to change direction, quick twitch isn’t there
-Struggles to bet blockers up the edge with speed

Summary:

Fifth year senior that has a lot of experience. Has been a consistent power force on that like that will likely be a plus run defender in the NFL. Lewis loves to play the role of a violent bully. He will deliver a punch the blocker and look to finish off a ball carrier hard. His effort is consistent and while the overall talent as pass rush skills may lack, he can find a role somewhere. I just don’t see an every down guy.

NFL Comparison: Vinny Curry / PHI

13 – Ogbonnia Okoronwo – Oklahoma – 6’2/253

Grade: 74

Strong Points:

-Fluid lower half, easy moving and easy bending
-Change of direction and reaction to the offense is natural and fluid
-Flattens the edge with no loss of speed

Weak Points:

-Plays small, overly reliant on movement and space
-Gets too high and when he does, he is an easy block
-Doesn’t stifle a blocker with his hands

Summary:

Fifth year senior. Was a two year factor for the Sooners, finishing with 29.5 TFL and 17 sacks over that time. A very good mover off the snap that, when he anticipates the snap well enough, can simply out race blockers up the edge. His quickness and body control and make it easy for him to adjust, making him an inside/double move threat as well. Okoronwo is highly touted by some, but he is one dimensional. If an NFL OT gets his hands on him, it’s over. He doesn’t have the strength to get off them and he won’t be much of a run defender. Not a fit for every scheme.

NFL Comparison: Dion Jordan / SEA

14 – Hercules Mata’afa – Washington State – 6’2/254

Grade: 74

Strong Points:

-Crafty against blockers, understands leverage and hand usage
-Has a nose for the ball, quick to locate and pounce
-Comfortable playing low to the ground

Weak Points:

-Very short arms and it shows up on tape, can be locked up
-Won’t be a speed rushing threat off the edge
-Power game is lacking, if he doesn’t get a head start he can be driven back

Summary:

Fourth year junior entry. Played a unique nose tackle role for the WSU defense. Despite being vastly undersized for the position, he was a very disruptive player. He constantly was in the backfield because of his snap anticipation, reaction, and ability to make himself small to defenders. As an NFL edge rusher, Mata’afa lacks the speed and size you want, but has proven to be crafty with his feet and hands. Might be a gimmick type player, so buyer beware.

NFL Comparison: Matt Longacre / LAR

15 – Davin Bellamy – Georgia – 6’4/255

Grade: 74

Strong Points:

-Man’s power presence already
-Gets his hands on the blocker first and will control the initial engagement
-Good instincts and feel for the action

Weak Points:

-Struggles with lateral movement and adjustment
-Speed up the edge is average at best
-Needs toe extra step or two when recovering

Summary:

Fifth year senior. Has been the run defending edge presence for the Bulldogs over the past two years that will occasionally surprise with burst in traffic. Bellamy is a an aggressive player that has the grown man’s style to playing. Against college kids, he was too powerful at times. I don’t think that will translate in to the NFL but I think there is some hidden potential here as a pass rusher. He is smart and crafty. A solid backup edge rusher that will be a weapon on special teams.

NFL Comparison: James Cowser / OAK

16 – Jeff Holland – Auburn – 6’1/249 –GRADE: 74
17 – Javon Rolland-Jones – Arkansas State – 6’2/253 – GRADE: 73
18 – Dorance Armstrong – Kansas – 6’4/257 – GRADE: 70
19 – Josh Sweat – Florida State – 6’5/251 – GRADE: 70
20 – Marquis Haynes – Ole Miss – 6’2/235 – GRADE: 68
21 – Joe Ostman – Central Michigan – 6’3/255 – GRADE: 68
22 – Duke Ejiofor – Wake Forest – 6’4/264 – GRADE: 68
23 – Anthony Winbush – Ball State – 6’1/249 – GRADE: 67
24 – Trevon Young – Louisville – 6’4/258 – GRADE: 66
25 – James Hearns – Louisville – 6’2/239 – GRADE: 66

NYG APPROACH

Without fully knowing the scheme, I think there is an obvious need for more edge presence on this roster. Whether it be a starter or a backup, NYG will need to address this at some point. Bradley Chubb is a real possibility with their first pick, I firmly believe that. Otherwise, they can sit back and wait for the right value. They can take a chance on Turay, Carter, or even Key on day 2 and hope their high ceiling is reached. Or they can play if safe with a Tyquan Lewis, Sam Hubbard, or Uchenna Nwusu. Those guys won’t ever be stars but they play smart and assignment-based, which is what I think they are looking for before anything else.

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David Syvertsen

David Syvertsen, aka Sy'56, has worked for Ourlads Scouting LLC since 2013, starting off as a college depth chart manager and now a lead scout for one the most-sold NFL draft guides year-in, year-out. He has been scouting for over 10 years and will compile anywhere from 400-600 scouting reports per season, with that number increasing year by year. He watches and studies game films 20-25 hours per week throughout the entire year with his main focus being NFL Draft prospects.

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