Apr 062018
 
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Tavarres King, New York Giants (December 17, 2017)

Tavarres King – © USA TODAY Sports

NEW YORK GIANTS RE-SIGN RYAN O’MALLEY…
The New York Giants have re-signed free agent tight end Ryan O’Malley, who was not tendered as an exclusive rights free agent by the team, thus making him an unrestricted free agent. The contract is reported to be a 1-year deal.

The Giants signed the 6’6”, 260-pound O’Malley to the Practice Squad and then the 53-man roster in December 2017. He played in the regular-season finale but did not have a catch.

O’Malley was originally signed as an undrafted rookie free agent by the Oakland Raiders after the 2016 NFL Draft. He spent time on both the Practice Squad and 53-man roster of the Raiders in 2016. The Raiders cut him in September 2017 and he spent a few weeks on the Practice Squad of the Bills.

MINNESOTA VIKINGS SIGN TAVARRES KING…
The Minnesota Vikings have signed New York Giants unrestricted free agent wide receiver Tavarres King, who began 2017 with the Giants, was waived in mid-September, and then was re-signed to the 53-man roster in October. He was placed on Injured Reserve with a concussion in December. King played in eight games with three starts in 2017, finishing with 18 catches for 240 yards (13.3 yards per catch) and three touchdowns.

King was originally drafted in the 5th round of the 2013 NFL Draft by the Denver Broncos. He spent time with the Broncos (2013), Panthers (2013-14), Jaguars (2014), and Buccaneers (2014-15). The Giants signed King to the Practice Squad in late September 2015. He played in seven regular season games and the playoff game for the Giants in 2016.

For a complete listing of comings and goings, see our New York Giants 2018 Free Agency Scorecard.

GIANTS HIRE NEW ASSISTANT STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING COACH…
The New York Giants have hired Thomas Stallworth as the team’s new assistant strength and conditioning coach. Stallworth replaces Markus Paul, who left the Giants for the Dallas Cowboys earlier this offseason. Aaron Wellman, who joined the Giants in 2016, remains the team’s strength and conditioning coach.

Stallworth’s bio:

  • 2017: Director of Football Strength and Conditioning, Western Kentucky University
  • 2016: Head Strength and Conditioning Coach, Fresno State
  • 2016: Associate Director of Strength and Conditioning, Texas Tech University
  • 2015-2016: Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach, North Carolina State University
  • 2012-2015: Associate Strength and Conditioning Coach, Mississippi State University
  • 2008-2011: Head Strength and Conditioning Coach, Grambling State University
  • 2004-2008: Head Strength and Conditioning Coach, South Carolina State University
  • Pro Experience: None
  • Collegiate Experience: Linebacker, University of Tennessee (1997-2001)

ELI MANNING HOLDS ANNUAL PASSING CAMP…
The New York Post and Newsday are reporting that New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning began his annual unofficial passing camp at Duke University on Thursday. Other players participating include wide receivers Sterling Shepard, Brandon Marshall, and Roger Lewis; tight ends Evan Engram and Rhett Ellison; and running back Wayne Gallman.

The workouts are overseen by current Duke University head football coach David Cutcliffe, who was Eli Manning’s head coach at the University of Mississippi from 2000 to 2003.

ARTICLES…

Feb 102018
 
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Kevin Stefanski, Minnesota Vikings (August 9, 2015)

Kevin Stefanski – © USA TODAY

REPORT – VIKINGS DENY GIANTS PERMISSION TO INTERVIEW KEVIN STEFANSKI…
ESPN is reporting that the Minnesota Vikings have denied the New York Giants permission to interview Vikings quarterbacks coach Kevin Stefanski. The Giants were interested in Stefanski as the team’s new offensive coordinator. The 35-year old Stefanski has served in various assistant coaching capacities for the Vikings since 2006.

Media speculation is that the Giants may now turn to former Seattle Seahawks offensive coordinator Darrell Bevell or Philadelphia Eagles running backs coach Duce Staley. However, the Eagles could also deny Staley permission to interview with the Giants.

REPORT – DAVE GETTLEMAN HIRES DRAFT CONSULTANT…
The New York Post is reporting that New York Giants General Manager Dave Gettleman has hired Mark Koncz as a scouting department consultant. Koncz worked with Gettleman with the Carolina Panthers as director of pro scouting, a position that Koncz had held since 2000. Gettleman promoted him to director of player personnel in May 2017 before the Panthers fired Koncz in July after Gettleman was also let go.

THE PLAYERS SPEAK…
Exclusive Giants.com interviews with the following players are available at Giants.com:

ARTICLES…

Feb 052018
 
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Steve Tisch, Pat Shurmur, and John Mara; New York Giants (January 26, 2018)

Steve Tisch, Pat Shurmur, and John Mara – © USA TODAY Sports

REPORT – GIANTS HIRE TWO MORE ASSISTANT COACHES…
The Sporting News is reporting that the New York Giants are hiring Ben Wilkerson as assistant offensive line coach and Deshea Townsend as assistant defensive backs coach. Wilkerson will work under new offensive line coach Hal Hunter while Townsend will work under new defensive backs coach Lou Anarumo.

Ben Wilkerson:

  • 2018-Present: Assistant Offensive Line Coach, New York Giants
  • 2015-2017: Assistant Offensive Line Coach, Chicago Bears
  • 2014: Assistant Football and Track Coach, North Shore Senior High School (Texas)
  • 2012-2013: Offensive Line Coach, Grambling State University
  • 2011: Offensive Administrative Intern, Louisiana State University
  • 2010: Offensive Graduate Assistant, Louisiana State University
  • Pro Experience: Offensive Lineman, Cincinnati Bengals (2005-2006), Atlanta Falcons (2007-2008), Florida Tuckers (2009)
  • Collegiate Experience: Offensive Lineman, Louisiana State University (2001-2004)
  • Born November 22, 1982

Deshea Townsend:

  • 2018-Present: Assistant Defensive Backs Coach, New York Giants
  • 2016-2017: Defensive Backs Coach, Tennessee Titans
  • 2013-2015: Cornerbacks Coach, Mississippi State University
  • 2011-2012: Assistant Defensive Backs Coach, Arizona Cardinals
  • Pro Experience: Cornerback, Pittsburgh Steelers (1998-2009), Indianapolis Colts (2010)
  • Collegiate Experience: Defensive Back, University of Alabama (1994-1997)
  • Born September 8, 1975

Although not officially announced, the following assistant coaching positions now appear to be filled, while others remain to be determined:

ARTICLES…

Jan 302018
 
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Ereck Flowers, New York Giants (October 1, 2017)

Ereck Flowers – © USA TODAY Sports

REPORT – GIANTS HIRE HAL HUNTER AS OFFENSIVE LINE COACH…
The Sporting News is reporting that the New York Giants will hire Hal Hunter as the team’s new offensive line coach. The 58-year old Hunter was out of football in 2017. He last served as offensive line coach of the Indianapolis Colts in 2015 and Cleveland Browns in 2016.

  • 2018-Present: Offensive Line Coach, New York Giants
  • 2016: Offensive Line Coach, Cleveland Browns
  • 2015: Offensive Line Coach, Indianapolis Colts
  • 2013-2014: Assistant Offensive Line Coach, Indianapolis Colts
  • 2012: Offensive Coordinator/Offensive Line Coach, San Diego Chargers
  • 2007-2011: Offensive Line Coach, San Diego Chargers
  • 2006: Assistant Offensive Line Coach, San Diego Chargers
  • 2002-2005: Offensive Line Coach, University of North Carolina
  • 2000-2001: Offensive Coordinator, Indiana University
  • 1999: Assistant Head Coach/Interim Head Coach, Louisiana State University
  • 1995-1998: Offensive Line Coach, Louisiana State University
  • 1994: Offensive Line Coach, Vanderbilt University
  • 1991-1993: Offensive Tackles/Tight Ends Coach, Vanderbilt University
  • 1987-1990: Offensive Line Coach, University of Akron
  • 1986: Offensive Line Coach, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
  • 1985: Offensive Line Coach, Columbia University
  • 1983-1984: Offensive Line Coach, University of Pittsburgh
  • 1982: Outside Linebackers Coach/Strength Coach, College of William and Mary
  • Pro Experience: None
  • Collegiate Experience: Linebacker, Northwestern University
  • Born July 8, 1959

Although not officially announced, the following assistant coaching positions now appear to be filled, while others remain to be determined:

ARTICLE…

Jan 292018
 
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Craig Johnson, New York Giants (August 3, 2014)

Running Backs Coach Craig Johnson – © USA TODAY Sports Images

REPORTS – GIANTS RETAIN CRAIG JOHNSON AND STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING STAFF…
Multiple media sources are reporting that the New York Giants have retained Running Backs Coach Craig Johnson, who has been with the Giants in that position since 2014.

  • 2014-Present: Running Backs Coach, New York Giants
  • 2011-2013: Quarterbacks Coach, Minnesota Vikings
  • 2010: Assistant Head Coach/Running Backs Coach, Tennessee Titans
  • 2002-2009: Quarterbacks Coach, Tennessee Titans
  • 2000-2001: Offensive Assistant/Quality Control, Tennessee Titans
  • 1999: Quarterbacks Coach, University of Maryland
  • 1997-1998: Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks Coach, University of Maryland
  • 1992-1996: Quarterbacks Coach, Northwestern University
  • 1989-1991: Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks Coach, Virginia Military Institute
  • 1986-1988: Running Backs Coach, Rutgers University
  • 1985: Fullbacks Coach, Army
  • 1984: Graduate Assistant, University of Arkansas
  • 1983: Graduate Assistant, University of Wyoming
  • Pro Experience: None
  • Collegiate Experience: Quarterback, University of Wyoming (1978-1982)
  • Born March 3, 1960

Multiple media sources are also reporting that the Giants will retain their strength and conditioning staff.

Strength and Conditioning Coach Aaron Wellman

  • 2016-Present: Strength and Conditioning Coach, New York Giants
  • 2015: Assistant Director of Strength and Conditioning, University of Notre Dame
  • 2011-2014: Director of Strength and Conditioning, University of Michigan
  • 2009-2011: Strength and Conditioning Coach, San Diego State University
  • 2004-2008: Director of Football Strength and Conditioning, Ball State University
  • 2001-2003: Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach, Michigan State University
  • 1998-2000: Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach, Indiana University
  • 1996-1997: Graduate Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach, Indiana University
  • Pro Experience: None
  • Collegiate Experience: Safety, Manchester College (Indiana)
  • Born April 18, 1974

Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach Markus Paul

  • 2007-Present: Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach New York Giants
  • 2006: Strength and Conditioning Coach, New York Jets
  • 2005: Director of Physical Development, New York Jets
  • 2000-2004: Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach, New England Patriots
  • 1998-1999: Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach, New Orleans Saints
  • Pro Experience: Safety, Chicago Bears (1989-1993) and Tampa Bay Buccaneers (1993)
  • Collegiate Experience: Safety, Syracuse University (1985-1988)
  • Born April 1, 1966

Director of Performance Nutrition/Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach Pratik Patel

  • 2017-Present, Director of Performance Nutrition/Asst. Strength & Conditioning Coach, New York Giants
  • 2014-2017: Sports Nutrition Coach, University of Oregon
  • 2012-2014: Sports Dietitian, Michigan State University Athletics/Department of Radiology
  • 2010-2012: Sports Dietitian, Kansas State University Men’s Basketball
  • Pro Experience: None
  • Collegiate Experience: None
  • Born N/A

Performance Manager Joe Danos

  • 2013-Present: Performance Manager/Strength and Conditioning Assistant, New York Giants
  • 2010-2012: Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach, Florida State University
  • 2007-2009: Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach, Southern Methodist University
  • 2005-2006: Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach, Louisiana State University
  • 2000-2004: Student Strength and Conditioning Coach, Louisiana State University
  • Pro Experience: None
  • Collegiate Experience: None
  • Born January 2, 1981

ARTICLES…

Jan 262018
 
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Pat Shurmur, New York Giants (January 26, 2018)

Pat Shurmur – © USA TODAY Sports

PAT SHURMUR INTRODUCTORY PRESS CONFERENCE…
Pat Shurmur was officially introduced as the new head coach of the New York Giants at press conference on Friday at the Quest Diagnostics Training Center in East Rutherford, New Jersey. Shurmur’s contract is reportedly a 5-year deal, running through the 2019 NFL season.

Opening Remarks by Team President/CEO John Mara (Video)
Good morning. As soon as our season ended, Steve Tisch, Dave Gettleman, Kevin Abrams and myself started this process of finding and identifying our new head coach. We were looking for someone with intelligence, leadership skills, a presence, a professional demeanor, and the right philosophy on how to build a team. It did not matter to any of us whether it was an offensive or a defensive coach. We did a considerable amount of research, which included speaking with executives and coaches, past and present, around the NFL, and players, as well. We were able to identify some great candidates, but it struck me that the name that constantly came up with just about everybody that we talked to was Pat Shurmur. We had some very impressive interviews with six different coaches. We had much discussion back and forth about each of these individuals. We did some more research, and we ultimately decided that Pat was the right man for this job. Pat has had considerable success as an offensive coordinator. He’s had prior experience as a head coach. He’s worked under some great coaches. He has an impressive record in developing young players, particularly quarterbacks, and he’s got an excellent track record as a play caller. And he’s very well‑respected by the players that he’s coached in the past. It also became apparent to us very early on that Pat and Dave share a similar philosophy in how to build a team, and that was no small factor in this decision. So in sum, he checked all of the boxes for us. For all of these reasons, we believe that he is the right coach at the right time for this franchise. So now, on behalf of the Tisch and Mara families, it is my pleasure and honor to introduce the new head coach of the New York Giants, Pat Shurmur.

Remarks by Head Coach Pat Shurmur (Video)
First, I’d like to thank John Mara; I’d like to thank Steve Tisch. I just met Jon and Laurie. I’d like to thank Dave Gettleman, Kevin Abrams. It’s an honor and a privilege to be the head coach of the New York Giants. As I mentioned recently, and I think it happened in one of the earlier articles, this is an iconic franchise. I understand most of the history. I walked by four Super Bowl trophies. As we go forward here, I’m looking forward to leading this organization, and I want to be the coach. I understand the responsibility that comes with being the coach.

I’m taking over a team that was 3‑13, so we’ve got to own that. There’s a lot of work to be done. There’s changes that need to be made. But running parallel with this press conference, I’m hiring a staff of guys that will help us get to where we need to be, and I think that’s the important piece.

I’d like to thank some other people. My wife Jennifer is here. We’ve been married for 27‑and‑a‑half years. She’s the strength of our family. She’s actually an East Coast girl. She grew up in Poughkeepsie. Her father was a Giants fan growing up in Waterbury, her mom was from New York, so this is somewhat of a homecoming, and she really is the strength of our family.

We have four children. Our daughters are here today. And they cry a lot. Anyway, so I have ‑‑ I’m crying because I’ve got three weddings on the horizon at some point, and they won’t be in a K of C hall.

Anyway, our three daughters are here today. We have four children:  Allyson and Erica, who live in Philadelphia, so they’re going to fight our battles on away turf. They live in Philly and we are very proud of them. Our daughter Claire is here, as well. She’s a freshman, will be a sophomore next year, and then our son Kyle is back in Nashville. He plays quarterback at Vanderbilt. They’re terrific kids. They’ve made great choices. They’ve spent their senior years in different towns; give plenty of free advice. ‘Dad, if the quarterback played better, we’d have won; that play where you hand the ball off and run it up the center, I don’t like that play.’  A lot of free advice, but much more unconditional love.

I’d like to thank my mom back in Michigan. My mom and dad did a heck of a job raising us. They taught us how to compete. They taught us how to have compassion. They taught us how not to let anybody tell you that you can’t do something. And so, I appreciate them and love them.

I’d like to thank the Minnesota Vikings. We went there two years ago and quickly became very close to the people up there. Mark and Zygi Wilf, obviously Kevin Warren, Rob Brzezinski, George Paton, and then certainly along the way Rick Spielman and Mike Zimmer. They are an outstanding organization. I want to thank the players, as well. They are an old‑school operation with an eye on the future, and they do it right. And if we’re going to get to where we need to be, at some point we’re going to have to play them and beat them. So that’ll be a challenge for us.

Now regarding me, you have hired a career coach. You’ve hired a guy that doesn’t know what he would do if he wasn’t doing this. You’ve hired a guy that wants every day to interact with the staff, the coaches, the players, and I really do feel like my role is to make everybody as good as they can be. And I think if we do that on a day‑to‑day basis, we’ll get to where we want to be, and that’s re-establish the winning tradition and put ourselves in a position to win championships. And I understand that’s a journey.

You’re going to try to all figure out who I am. Some would say I’m a little serious. Alright, I get that. But I do think this is a serious business. It’s played and coached by adults. We just happen to do it with a young person’s enthusiasm, and I think that’s important. Some will tell you I have a healthy sense of humor. Those are the people that know me. I’m okay laughing at myself, and I own all that. Most people will tell you that I’m competitive and gritty, and that’s the overachiever’s mindset in me. I feel like we don’t know it all, and I look forward to learning something new every day. Those of you that do know me, though, I have zero tolerance for people that don’t compete. I have zero tolerance for people that don’t give effort, and I have zero tolerance for people that show a lack of respect. And I think that’s something that you’ll know about me as we get to know each other better.

But the people and the players that know me know that I’m willing to give them a hug at the end of a hard day. That’s a little bit about me. I can’t wait to get going. As you know, we’re in the process of hiring a staff. Some of those names are public, so I have no problem commenting on that. As we put the staff together, we’ll try to get you that information in a timely way.

And I learned in my last shot at being a head coach, information travels off your thumbs very quickly, and we as coaches needed to learn ‑‑ in the old handbook it was, ‘Say nothing and be very guarded.’  I don’t feel like that’s necessary anymore. So I’ll try to answer your questions. Unfortunately, the answer to a question might be, ‘It’s between me and the player’, and then you can find out what the player thinks; know what I mean?  So I get that. But I’ll try to be open. We’ll try to answer your questions in really any situation, except for those things that involve Giants’ business that make no sense to be public.

That being said, certainly thrilled to be here, and I’m certainly thrilled to lead our organization back to the path of winning. With that, I’ll take your questions.

Q: What did you learn in your first stop (as a head coach) that makes you feel you’re better equipped to be in this spot the second time around?

A: Good question. I mentioned this one before, too. Everything Cleveland, I wish I knew then what I know now. I think when you’re doing anything for the first time, there’s things that happen that you adjust to that if you’ve done them before, and I’m being a little bit vague here. Some of it’s really not specific. But obviously once you’ve done it before, you have the resources, and you’ve made those decisions. You’ve made those calls. You’ve done the things that you say if I do that again, I’ll never do that again. And I think I learned that.

Q: What do you think your relationship with Eli Manning will be, and in the interview process how strongly were you saying, ‘I want this 37‑year‑old quarterback to be back here’?

A: Well, first off, I think the relationship is going to be very strong. I’ve watched him, competed against him, admired how he’s played over the years. Got to spend some time with him this summer in the Manning Academy setting. I’ve already spoken to him on the phone and he’s an outstanding football player, and I can’t wait to get to work with him. I’ve admired the way he’s handled things. I sort of like a calm approach to the position. Looking forward to getting to work with him.

Q: How do you win that locker room?  How do you get that locker room playing for you, playing hard?

A: Yeah, with regard to the players, I really do believe it’s about the players. We used to have a thing we said in Philadelphia, and then certainly when we went to Minnesota that, ‘It’s not the plays, it’s the players.’  I think what’s important is we’re going to establish the right way to do things. We’re going to establish what we want as a New York Giants football team. And what we’re going to do is we’re going to inspire the players to see it our way, and I think that’s an important thing. There’s reasons why the Giants slipped to 3‑13, and we’re going to find out what some of those reasons are behind the scenes, and we’re going to try to get them fixed at the beginning. Now, I will say this:  When it comes to coaching and playing, you work together, and I think what’s important is we establish at the very beginning the way we’re going to do things, what we expect, and then keep talking about why it’s important so that they believe it, as well.

Q: Are you planning to call the plays?

A: I do plan to call the plays, yes.

Q: What’s your plan offensive coordinator wise?

A: That’s a little bit behind the scenes right now. I’m not avoiding that. That’s a work in progress. But I’m going to hire ‑‑ with regard to all of our coaches ‑‑ here’s what I was looking for and some of them are here in the building. There’s not six or seven guys becoming head coaches every year, and I don’t think you need to sweep the whole place clean. There’s some really good coaches here, and I want to first keep them. There’s other guys we’re looking at outside the building that are, number one, career coaches, outstanding teachers, communicators, and so we’re looking for those type people. Some of them are currently not quite available, but we’ll make sure we get a staff full of guys that can inspire our players.

Q: I know you’ve been to Mobile, but how much have you looked at film of Eli Manning and Odell when he was healthy and really start studying this offense, and Davis Webb as well?

A: Yeah, I’m very familiar with the offense, very familiar with the players, and again, I look forward to visiting with them. Certainly this time of year we can’t talk schematics, but I’m looking forward to once we get through today, really getting a chance to get to know the players. I think what’s important is, you know, we’re all sort of what we believe and what our experiences tell us, and so I think what’s important when you’re talking with players that have had success, sit down and start to communicate – here’s the things that they did well, here’s the things that I believe in, and let’s do the things that work best for us. And so that’s going to be the process as I go through with all the players.

Q: When you look at this team last year at 3‑13, do you still see a lot of talent there? A lot of the same players returning from the 11‑5 year the year before. Or a lack of talent, or was it other issues that caused it?

A: Well, I think we’ll get into whether there were other issues. There are a lot of very talented players on this team. I think every team has that. And then every team goes through seasons. A year ago in Minnesota we had a lot of injuries, and again, they didn’t become part of the daily conversation, but we found our way to be 8‑8, dealing with a lot of adversity. This year we won 14, and we made some changes, although they may not have seemed to be big changes, that can do that. Now, I’m not saying that’s what’s going to happen in a year, but I do know this:  Every year is different. Every year you have new players. You have new coaches. And the challenge is then when we get going here the first part of April is we work together to put together a team that has the chemistry to go out and compete and win, so that’s what we’re looking to do.

Q: What is your evaluation, following up on the Eli questions, about where Eli is at in his career, how much he might have left, and how that would factor into what might be done with the second pick in the draft?

A: Yeah, I think those are all questions for down the road. I’m sure we’ll talk about that up until the draft. You know, I watched Eli throw a little bit this summer, and I walked away saying, ‘He looked really, really good.’  He looked fit. He was throwing the ball well. The ball had good velocity coming off his hand. And again, I think he’s got years left. How much, I don’t know. But I think he has time left, and I look forward to working with him. With regard to who we’re going to draft, you know, I’m not ducking that question. I think that we’ve got to travel down that road of evaluation to see what happens there. But I think what’s important is we have a guy here that’s helped this organization win Super Bowls. He’s an outstanding player, and I’m really looking forward to working with him.

Q: I’m just wondering if you’ve given some thought to the type of identity, the type of culture you want to build within the locker room.

A: Yeah, I think what’s important, and I alluded to it, we need to have a tough, gritty team that knows how to compete. I think what’s important is when we put the roster together, we want to first accumulate 90 players that love to play football. Now, certainly they’re going to have to have the skill and ability to do it, but we want to put together a group of 90 and then eventually get to 53. I think sometimes the good answer for a young player is, ‘I really don’t know what I’d do if I didn’t have this game.’  And I think it’s the absolute greatest game in the world. And so we need to find guys that love to play the game, and then we’ll decide whether they’re good enough, and then we’ll take it from there.

Q: I was wondering if you could talk a little bit about your defensive coordinator James Bettcher and what you think he’s going to bring to the team.

A: Yeah, I’ve known James for a while, and I think he’s a rising star in the profession. He’s played ‑‑ they’ve played outstanding defense in Arizona for a very long time. He’s a little bit multiple in his scheme, which I think is good. Everyone I’ve talked to, he inspires the player. He’s got a great presence, and we’re really, really fortunate to have him be with us. Very hard to score against. They find a way to put pressure on the quarterback. They do a good job in their coverage schemes, and they’ve been good at stopping the run. He’s had a top‑six defense the last three years, and for whatever reason on the teams I’ve been on, I’ve crossed over against them.

Q: You say he’s multiple in his schemes. Do you envision more of a three‑man front here?

A: I think that’s talked about often, three‑man front, five on the line, four‑man front. I think all defenses play a version of that throughout the game. Even teams that play five on the line, you know, they’re in nickel 60 percent of the time, so it’s a four‑man front. So the ability to be multiple in my opinion, as long as you can still remain fundamental, is something that’s hard on an offense, and I’ve faced that through the years.

Q: What would you say to a Giants’ fan base that isn’t disappointed with the past season, it’s furious and expects a quick turnaround?

A: I get furious. I get quick turnaround. I do know that what’s important is we get better every day. With regard to players, if each player swaps, so to speak, makes us incrementally better, that’s what we’re looking to do. You know, you eat an elephant one bite at a time. So we’re going to do that. And I think what’s important is we just every day work toward where we need to be. Then it won’t be a three‑pointer at the buzzer. Then we will have established a team that can sustain that over time.

Q: Do you have a philosophy at all in dealing with a locker room where probably a result of the losing was the in‑fighting, the back‑biting, the players not getting along and that becoming public here?

A: Yeah, I think ‑‑ well, first off, I admire how resourceful people are at getting information, so I don’t really believe there’s any secrets. Okay, so I think what you do is you start initially with the locker room by developing relationships with those guys that love to play football, and you’re constantly talking to them about what it means to be a good pro. For a receiver to be a good pro sometimes is even though you’re frustrated that you didn’t get the ball, you’ve got to make sure you keep that in check. Or for whatever reason. Maybe you’re a defensive lineman that’s not getting as many sacks. They need to understand that the pressure you’re putting on the quarterback, even though you didn’t sack him, is just as important. Two quick examples of being able to just constantly communicate with the players. We as coaches are educators. We work with the players, and it’s important that we inspire them to play their very best. And some of that is going and talking about those types of issues.

Q: We talk about Odell Beckham Jr., here, and the role he has in this offense. I know you have a previous relationship with Eli. Do you have a previous relationship with Odell?  Have you had a chance to talk to him yet, and what do you envision for him in your offense?

A: Well, he’s a tremendous player. I went through the evaluation process at the time I was in Philadelphia and he was high on our draft board. We loved him as a player, and really pre‑draft stuff, we loved everything about him. I’ve watched him play and compete, and when you throw all the other stuff out and you watch him on the field, he’s outstanding. So it makes sense to throw him the football. I’m just going to say that right away. If I didn’t acknowledge that, then you’ve definitely got the wrong guy up here. But I think what needs to happen now is I need to get to know him. I need to get to know what makes him tick, and I get to ‑‑ I need to talk to him about what it is that we’re looking for for a guy that plays for the New York Giants. And I think those are the things that go back to relationship building that need to happen very, very soon.

Q: John Mara mentioned that you and Dave Gettleman have kind of a similar philosophy how to build a team, and when you were sitting in that interview, as the Giants were saying, ‘This could be our guy’, what were you saying, specifically talking to Gettleman about building a team, what made you say, ‘This is for me’?

A: As soon as he said, ‘Everything starts with the offensive line.’  And I think there’s a great example of that, what we went through in Minnesota. We didn’t change the oil up there, we changed the transmission. We went and got two free agent offensive linemen, we drafted a center that played like a veteran, and we transformed the offensive line that helped us do the things that helped us win 14 games. And so I think it’s very important, no matter how good your offensive line is and your defensive line, you have to address those issues constantly because if you can’t block them and you can’t pressure the quarterback, this game gets really, really, really hard. I know that about Dave. I know we have a serious mindset when it comes to doing what we can to upgrade in those areas. And some of it may be just inspiring a player on the roster to play better than he’s played, you know, and that comes back to coaching. And then we all know that every once in a while, you need to get some new players.

Q: What’s your first priority here, first couple priorities once you’re done here today?

A: Well, there’s a lot kind of running parallel right now. I certainly want to get a feel for the passion in the building. I came in yesterday, and I had an opportunity to walk around the building. There’s a lot of people here that when you shake their hand, you know that they’re fully committed to us winning. So keep that going. We’re certainly in the process of putting our staff together, and then we’re also running parallel with that. The player evaluation phase as well as the player acquisition phase, which is free agency and the draft. All that runs parallel. Once I get the full staff in place, then we’ll start talking about our scheme behind the scenes, and believe it or not, there’s a lot that goes on, and we’re just a few weeks behind that.

Q: Did you look at this as inevitable becoming a head coach again, or did something spark interest again this season?

A: What I learned about life is nothing is inevitable, and there’s no use planning for it. But I’m thrilled to be here. I feel much more prepared to do this than the first time around. And again, I try to learn something new every day, and I’m learning something about this situation that will help me as we get our team ready to play.

Q: Am I correct that in Cleveland you called the plays the first year and turned it over the second year?

A: Yeah, but I was still involved the second year, as well.

Q. Is there anything concern about the head coach with this look (holding play sheet in front of face), not seeing?

A: What look is that?

Q: You know, having that play sheet in front of you and not being involved with the whole thing.

A: No, not at all. I think when you put a staff together, there’s people upstairs ‑‑ there’s constant communication ‑‑ the reason we wear headsets is we’re talking to each other, and if it was just the head coach and nobody else, then I would say, yeah, that’s tough. But the way that we’re going to put the staff together, there’s constant communication, and we’ll have experienced people in all the roles necessary. It’s been done before. You see teams around the league doing it. Why guys do it and then eventually give it up or whatever, that’s their decision. You know, it’s football.

Q: Is there anything that intimidates you about coaching this hallowed franchise or working in this number 1 media market?

A: No, I’m not intimidated. I’m only ‑‑ I would say this:  The only thing that frightens me is anything that affects the health and welfare of my kids and family. Other than that, have at it. I’m ready to go.

Q: Most people when they look at the Giants, all they care about is ‘Are they getting back to the playoffs, when is it happening’, or are you just going into this year saying, ‘Let’s be competitive again and we’ll take it from there’?

A: Like I said, we’re going to do what we can to get better each day, and how fast that happens, I’m as impatient as the fans, and I understand that. But we’re going to try to get better each day. As I mentioned, we have a lot of really good players on this team. We’re going to get some new ones, and we’re going to try to put together a team that can go out next year and win games.

Q: You mentioned throwing out all the other stuff. When it comes to Odell that hasn’t been easy. How will you handle a player whose behavior hasn’t always reflected positively on the organization?

A: Yeah, well, this is sort of a clean slate deal right now. As I mentioned, we need to sit down and talk. When things happen, there’s typically reasons for it. I learned that by coaching the quarterback. You know, I was ‑‑ I’ve said this, I’m at peace with a wide range of emotions, and so when you coach other positions, you can kind of fly off the handle and that sort of works. With a quarterback you’ve got to constantly keep saying to him, and this helped me when I started coaching quarterbacks, what did you see, why did you do that; all right, let’s talk about it. And I think with all things Odell, we just need to start talking and find out why things happened, and if they’re not what is by our standards, then we’ve got to find a way to get him fixed.

Q: How do you envision the offense that ‑‑ how would you describe the offense that you’re bringing in?  You have a West Coast background, but you’ve obviously ‑‑ how would you describe your own offense?

A: I don’t know, we were a top‑10 offense this year. I think we have an offense that we’re going to constantly try to do the things that our players can do well. So once we quickly learn what our players are good at, then we’ll ‑‑ but I do have a West Coast background. My last three years in Philadelphia, I was with Chip Kelly, and so the tempo and being able to play fast, there’s advantages to using that strategically. When you can run the ball like we did this year, and we developed a core set of runs, then the play actions are meaningful and that’s how you can drive the ball down the field. So try to use all those things. And then when they’re trying to destroy our quarterback, certainly the screen game is something that’s very important. So I don’t know. I don’t know if there’s a label for it. We want to play good offense. We want to play New York Giants offense.

Q: You seem to be smitten with Eli. What were your thoughts about Davis Webb when he was eligible?

A: Yeah, good question, Davis Webb. We went through the process on Davis Webb, and we thought he was an outstanding player. We liked how competitive he was. He’s got size. He’s got good arm strength. We felt like he was a guy worthy of being drafted and having a chance to be a starter someday. Again, beyond that, I don’t know much about him. There isn’t much tape out there on him that I was able to see, and so he’s another player that I’m looking forward to getting to know.

JOHN MARA’S POST-PRESS CONFERENCE REMARKS…
The transcript of team President and CEO John Mara’s post-introductory press conference remarks is available in The Corner Forum. The video is available at Giants.com.

STEVE TISCH’S POST-PRESS CONFERENCE REMARKS…
The transcript of team Chairman and Executive Vice President Steve Tisch’s post-introductory press conference remarks is available in The Corner Forum. The video is available at Giants.com.

DAVE GETTLEMAN’S CONFERENCE CALL…
The transcript of General Manager Dave Gettleman’s conference call with the media is available in The Corner Forum.

ARTICLES…

Jan 192018
 
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Steve Spagnuolo and Eli Manning, New York Giants (December 31, 2017)

Steve Spagnuolo and Eli Manning – © USA TODAY Sports

GIANTS STILL WAITING ON PAT SHURMUR…
It is widely assumed among national and local sports media that the New York Giants and Minnesota Offensive Coordinator Pat Shurmur have tentatively agreed that Shurmur will become the 18th head coach of the New York Giants. The New York Post is reporting that both sides came to an agreement on January 15th, five days after Shurmur interviewed with the team. The hold-up right now is the Minnesota Vikings are still in the playoffs. If the Vikings are eliminated by the Eagles in Sunday’s NFC Championship Game, a formal announcement could be made soon. If not, the announcement will have to wait until after the Super Bowl, which we be held on February 4th.

On Thursday, Shurmur was asked about his interview with the Giants. “I thought it was a really good conversation and I felt we connected on a lot of levels,’’ said Shurmur. “I walked away saying — and I knew this going into it — that’s an iconic franchise. I walked away feeling that same amount of respect for them. When I think of them, I just have great respect for what they’ve accomplished. They’ve won through the years, the players, the Lombardi Trophies, it’s iconic in a lot of ways. I know when I was with the Eagles and we got on the bus and rode up the parkway I was looking forward to competing against them. That’s a little piece of me.”

In recent years, the 52-year old Shurmur has served as Philadelphia Eagles quarterback coach (2002-2008), St. Louis Rams offensive coordinator (2009-2010), Cleveland Browns head coach (2011-2012), Eagles offensive coordinator (2013-2015), and Vikings tight ends coach (2016). Shurmur was promoted to Vikings offensive coordinator in 2017. He also served as interim head coach for the Eagles in 2015 and interim offensive coordinator for the Vikings in 2016.

The New York Post is reporting/speculating the following:

  • A second interview with Shurmur should merely be considered a “stamp of approval.” A source told The Post, “If you have a second interview very rarely is that not to get the job. It’s done, unless something horrible happens.”
  • The Giants were the first choice for Shurmur. “He was always infatuated by the Giants because the Giants are the Giants,’’ said a source. Selling points were the team’s ownership, roster, quarterback situation, and 2018 draft position.
  • Shurmur supposedly thinks Eli Manning can still play and having the #2 pick in the draft to possibly spend on a quarterback is also attractive.
  • Steve Spagnuolo, who served as the team’s interim head coach for the final quarter of the season, may be retained as defensive coordinator by Shurmur. Both worked together in Philadelphia and St. Louis.
  • The Giants were disappointed that they lost Defensive Line Coach Patrick Graham to the Green Bay Packers.

DAVE GETTLEMAN MEETS WITH ELI MANNING…
The New York Post and Newsday are reporting that Dave Gettleman met with quarterback Eli Manning for the first time last Friday in Gettleman’s new role as general manager of the New York Giants.

“Yes, it was a great meeting,’’ Gettleman told The Post on Thursday. “There’s only three guys who are still here from when I left. Eli, Zak DeOssie and JPP (Jason Pierre-Paul)… We had a great conversation and everything went well.’’

When asked about the results of the meeting, Gettleman responded, “I don’t want to go there.”

Manning has two years and $22 million in base salary and $11 million in bonuses left on his current contract. His 2018 cap hit is currently scheduled to be $22.2 million. Manning also has a no-trade clause in his contract.

MIKE SOLARI SIGNS WITH THE SEATTLE SEAHAWKS…
New York Giants Offensive Line Coach Mike Solari has joined the coaching staff of the Seattle Seahawks. Solari is the sixth Giants coach to depart this offseason, including Offensive Coordinator Mike Sullivan, Quarterbacks Coach Frank Cignetti, Jr., Wide Receivers Coach Adam Henry, Tight Ends Coach Kevin M. Gilbride, and Defensive Line Coach Patrick Graham.

EVAN ENGRAM AND DALVIN TOMLINSON HONORED…
New York Giants tight end Evan Engram and defensive tackle Dalvin Tomlinson have been voted to the Pro Football Writers’ “All-Rookie Team.” Engram and Tomlinson were selected in the 1st and 2nd rounds of the 2017 NFL Draft by the Giants, respectively.

ARTICLES…

Jan 022018
 
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Eric Studesville, Denver Broncos (October 9, 2016)

Eric Studesville – © USA TODAY Sports

GIANTS INTERESTED IN ERIC STUDESVILLE AND PAT SHURMUR…
The New York Giants will interview Denver Broncos Assistant Head Coach/Running Backs Coach Eric Studesville for the team’s head coaching vacancy on Friday. Denver fired Studesville on Monday. ESPN is reporting that the Giants have also requested to interview Minnesota Vikings Offensive Coordinator Pat Shurmur for the head coaching vacancy as well.

The 50-year old Studesville served as the Giants’ running back coach under Head Coach Jim Fassel (2001-2003) before going on to hold the same position with the Buffalo Bills (2004-2009) and Broncos (2010-2017). Studesville also served as interim head coach of the Broncos for four games in 2010 and became an assistant head coach in 2017.

In recent years, the 52-year old Shurmur has served as Philadelphia Eagles quarterback coach (2002-2008), St. Louis Rams offensive coordinator (2009-2010), Cleveland Browns head coach (2011-2012), Philadelphia Eagles offensive coordinator (2013-2015), and Vikings tight ends coach (2016). Shurmur was promoted to Vikings offensive coordinator in 2017. He also served as interim head coach for the Eagles in 2015.

GIANTS SIGN NINE PLAYERS TO RESERVE/FUTURES CONTRACTS…
The New York Giants have signed the following players to reserve/futures contracts:

  • WR Amba Etta-Tawo
  • WR Canaan Severin
  • OG Ethan Cooper
  • DE Jordan Williams
  • DT Kristjan Sokoli
  • CB Jeremiah McKinnon
  • CB Tim Scott
  • PK Marshall Koehn
  • P Austin Rehkow

All of the players except for the two kickers finished 2017 on the Giants’ Practice Squad.

Koehn was originally signed by the Miami Dolphins as an undrafted rookie free agent after the 2016 NFL Draft. He has spent time with the Dolphins (2016), Minnesota Vikings (2017), and Cincinnati Bengals (2017). He’s played in only one regular-season game with no field goal attempts.

Rehkow was signed by the Buffalo Bills as an undrafted rookie free agent after the 2017 NFL Draft. The Bills waived him in August.

ARTICLES…

Dec 312017
 
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Jim Schwartz, Philadelphia Eagles (November 19, 2017)

Jim Schwartz – © USA TODAY Sports

REPORT: GIANTS INTERESTED IN JIM SCHWARTZ…
ESPN is reporting that Philadelphia Eagles Defensive Coordinator Jim Schwartz is one of the front runners – and may be the favorite – for the New York Giants’ head coaching vacancy. Schwartz is expected to interview with the Giants next week.

The 51-year old Schwartz has served as the defensive coordinator of the Tennessee Titans (2001-2008), head coach of the Detroit Lions (2009-2013), defensive coordinator of the Buffalo Bills (2014), and defensive coordinator of the Eagles (2016-2017) in recent years. He was 29–51 (.363) in the regular season and 0-1 in the post-season as Detroit’s head coach.

Meanwhile, The Daily News is reporting that the Giants top head coaching candidates, in order of preference, are Josh McDaniels (New England Patriots offensive coordinator), Matt Patricia (New England Patriots defensive coordinator), Bill O’Brien (head coach of the Houston Texans), Pat Shurmur (Minnesota Vikings offensive coordinator), and Schwartz.

REPORT: DAVE GETTLEMAN WILL RUN THE DRAFT…
The Daily News is reporting that New York Giants General Manager Dave Gettleman will not immediately replace recently-fired Vice President of Player Evaluation Marc Ross and that Gettleman will run the 2018 NFL Draft for the Giants instead. Ross had run the team’s drafts under recently-fired General Manager Jerry Reese since 2007.

The Daily News is also reporting that Gettleman is not currently planning any other changes to the front office structure of the Giants. That would suggest that Assistant General Manager Kevin Abrams, who had served as interim general manager after Reese was fired, will be retained as the team’s salary cap expert.

GIANTS WILL PICK SECOND IN THE 2018 NFL DRAFT…
Even though the New York Giants won on Sunday, they will still pick second in the 2018 NFL Draft due to the Indianapolis Colts defeating the Houston Texans 22-13. The Cleveland Browns currently have the first pick.

NEW YORK GIANTS 18 – WASHINGTON REDSKINS 10…
The New York Giants ended their historically-dreadful 2017 season with a rare win, defeating the Washington Redskins 18-10. With the victory, the Giants finished the season 3-13. It was also Steve Spagnuolo’s first victory as interim head coach.

With a hodgepodge offensive line of right tackle Adam Bisnowaty, right guard Jon Halapio, center Brett Jones, left guard John Jerry, and left tackle Chad Wheeler, the Giants rushed for 260 yards against the Redskins. Jerry suffered a concussion in the 1st quarter and was replaced early by John Greco.

The Giants out-gained the Redskins in first downs (17 to 10), total net yards (381 to 197), and net yards rushing (260 to 61). Neither team passed for over 140 net yards. The Giants also won the critical turnover battle 3-to-1.

Most of the game’s excitement came within the first seven minutes. On the second offensive snap of the game, running back Orleans Darkwa broke off a 75-yard touchdown. The extra point was blocked. Then on Washington’s third offensive snap, linebacker Kelvin Sheppard intercepted quarterback Kirk Cousins at the Redskins 31-yard line and returned the ball 12 yards to the 19-yard line. Two plays later, quarterback Eli Manning hit wide receiver Hunter Sharp for a 16-yard score. The two-point conversion attempt failed and the Giants were up 12-0.

Washington went three-and-out on their second possession, but the Giants gave the ball right back when Manning’s pass intended for running back Wayne Gallman was intercepted and returned to the NYG 20-yard line. Two plays later, Cousins scrambled into the end zone from 12 yards out to cut the score to 12-7 midway through the 1st quarter. Neither team would reach the end zone again.

The Giants responded with a 9-play, 70-yard drive that set up a successful 23-yard field goal by place kicker Aldrick Rosas. The Giants now led 15-7. The only points generated in the 2nd quarter came late when Brad Wing’s punt was returned 29 yards to the Giants’ 31-yard line with four seconds to go before halftime. On the half’s final play, Washington kicked a 49-yard field goal to make the score Giants 15 – Redskins 10.

Counting the four punts in the 2nd quarter and three in the 3rd quarter, the Giants punted the ball away seven times in a row in the game. The Giants finally extended their lead to 18-10 after a 10-play, 52-yard drive resulted in a 29-yard field goal early in the 4th quarter.

Meanwhile, the even more anemic Redskins had their seven second-half possessions result in a missed field goal, four punts, and two interceptions – one by cornerback Ross Cockrell and a second by Sheppard late that salted the game away.

Manning finished the game 10-of-28 for 132 yards, 1 touchdown, and 1 interception. His leading receiver was tight end Rhett Ellison, who had five catches for 63 yards. Darkwa rushed for 154 yards and a touchdown on 20 carries. Gallman chipped in with 89 yards on 15 carries.

Defensively, Sheppard (two) and Cockrell (one) had all three of the Giants turnovers on interceptions. Cockrell was also credited with four pass defenses. The Giants also had three sacks with defensive end Olivier Vernon (1.5), defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul (0.5), and linebacker Devon Kennard (1.0) all getting to the quarterback.

Video highlights/lowlights are available at Giants.com.

GIANTS 2018 OPPONENTS SET…
The New York Giants will play the following teams during the 2018 NFL regular season:

Home:

  • Dallas Cowboys
  • Philadelphia Eagles
  • Washington Redskins
  • New Orleans Saints
  • Tampa Bay Buccaneers
  • Jacksonville Jaguars
  • Tennessee Titans
  • Chicago Bears

Away:

  • Dallas Cowboys
  • Philadelphia Eagles
  • Washington Redskins
  • Carolina Panthers
  • Atlanta Falcons
  • Houston Texans
  • Indianapolis Colts
  • San Francisco 49ers

INACTIVE LIST AND INJURY REPORT…
Inactive for the game were wide receiver Sterling Shepard (neck), tight end Evan Engram (rib), offensive tackle Ereck Flowers (groin), defensive end Avery Moss (hip), quarterback Geno Smith, offensive guard Damien Mama, and linebacker Akeem Ayers.

Offensive guard John Jerry (concussion) and defensive tackle Jay Bromley (ankle) left the game and did not return.

Wide receiver Roger Lewis told reporters after the game that he will be having ankle surgery.

POST-GAME REACTION…
Transcripts and video clips of post-game media sessions with Interim Head Coach Steve Spagnuolo and the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

POST-GAME NOTES…
The New York Giants’ 13 losses are a franchise record. The three victories are the team’s fewest since 1983.

The Giants finished 2-6 in MetLife Stadium, their fewest home victories since they were 1-7 in 2003.

The Giants finished 1-5 in NFC East games and 1-11 in games vs. NFC opponents.

The Giants scored 246 points, their lowest total since they scored 243 in 2003.

Running back Orleans Darkwa’s 75-yard touchdown run was the Giants’ longest run from scrimmage since November 16, 2008, when Ahmad Bradshaw ran for 77 yards vs. Baltimore (but did not score) and Darkwa’s score was the Giants’ longest touchdown run since Bradshaw’s 88-yarder in Buffalo on December 23, 2007.

Darkwa averaged 7.7 yards per carry in the game. The last Giants’ back to average at least that many yards on at least 20 carries was Tiki Barber on December 30, 2006.

The Giants scored two touchdowns in the first 2:42 of a game for the first time since the 1970 merger.

Wide receiver Hunter Sharp is the 50th different receiver to catch a regular-season touchdown pass from quarterback Eli Manning.

Manning played in his 216th regular-season game. He shares the franchise record with Pro Football Hall of Famer Michael Strahan.

Defensive tackle Dalvin Tomlinson is the first Giants’ rookie defensive lineman to start 16 games since Barry Cofield in 2006.

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
Interim Head Coach Steve Spagnuolo and select players will address the media on Monday.

Dec 282017
 
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Dave Gettleman, Carolina Panthers (March 1, 2017)

Dave Gettleman – © USA TODAY Sports

NEW YORK GIANTS HIRE DAVE GETTLEMAN AS GENERAL MANAGER…
The New York Giants announced on Thursday that they have hired Dave Gettleman as the team’s general manager. Kevin Abrams had been serving as the Giants’ interim general manager since Jerry Reese was fired on December 4th.

The 66-year old Gettleman was the Giants’ pro personnel director (1999-2011) and senior pro personnel analyst (2012) before becoming the general manager of the Carolina Panthers (2013-2017). The Panthers fired Gettleman in July 2017.

The Giants only interviewed Gettleman and three other individuals for the position, including Giants’ Vice President of Player Evaluation Marc Ross, former Washington Redskins and Philadelphia Eagles Director of Pro Personnel Louis Riddick, and Abrams, who was the team’s assistant general manager before serving as interim GM. Gettleman was interviewed by team President/CEO John Mara, Chairman/Executive Vice President Steve Tisch, and former general manager Ernie Accorsi last Wednesday. Accorsi served as a consultant to Mara and Tisch during the selection process.

“Given where we are as a team, we thought it was important to bring in someone with experience as a general manager and a proven track record,” Mara and Tisch said in a written statement. “Dave’s experience is unparalleled. He did an outstanding job as general manager in Carolina, and he was vital to our success during his tenure here. Dave is going to bring his own approach to our organization in how we draft and acquire players through free agency.”

Gettleman will be introduced to the media on Friday at an 11:15AM news conference at Quest Diagnostics Training Center.

NEW YORK GIANTS INJURY REPORT…
Wide receiver Sterling Shepard (neck), wide receiver Tavarres King (concussion), tight end Evan Engram (rib), and defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul (finger/back) did not practice on Thursday.

Wide receiver Roger Lewis (ankle), offensive tackle Ereck Flowers (groin), offensive tackle Bobby Hart (ankle), and defensive end Avery Moss (hip) practiced on a limited basis.

THE COACHES SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following coaches are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

THE PLAYERS SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at Giants.com:

ARTICLES…

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
The New York Giants practice on Friday at 10:55AM. Interim Head Coach Steve Spagnuolo and select players will address the media after practice.