Aug 172016
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Josh Brown, New York Giants (August 22, 2015)

Josh Brown – © USA TODAY Sports Images

New York Giants place kicker Josh Brown has been suspended for one regular-season game without pay for violating the NFL Personal Conduct Policy. Brown will miss the opener against the Dallas Cowboys. No specifics were given on the reason for the suspension.

“While I do not agree with the suspension, I will accept it,” said Brown. “I have exhausted the appeals process and have no other options along those lines. I will continue to work hard for this team, and I have tremendous confidence in my teammates and in my ability to move on and contribute to the team.”

“We have been supportive of Josh and will continue to be, but we accept the league’s decision,” said Head Coach Ben McAdoo.

The Giants currently have two place kickers on the roster, the other being Tom Obarski. The Giants signed Obarski to a reserve/future contract in January 2016. Obarski was originally signed by the Cincinnati Bengals as an undrafted rookie free agent after the 2015 NFL Draft, but he did not make the team.

The New York Giants signed cornerback Joe Powell on Wednesday. Powell played for the semi-pro Portsmouth Mustangs in 2014, the Lehigh Valley Steelhawks of the Professional Indoor Football League (PIFL) in 2015, and the Cleveland Gladiators of the Arena Football League (AFL) in 2016. He earned PIFL “Defensive Rookie of the Year” honors in 2015 after breaking the league record with 11 interceptions, including two he returned for touchdowns. In the AFL, Powell intercepted seven passes in nine games, returning four of the picks for touchdowns.

New York Giants linebacker J.T. Thomas (hamstring) remains on the Physically-Unable-to-Perform (PUP) List.

Wide receiver Victor Cruz (groin), wide receiver Geremy Davis (hamstring), tight end Will Johnson (burner), left guard Justin Pugh (bruised shoulder), defensive end Kerry Wynn (groin), cornerback Eli Apple (strained leg muscle), and Matt Smalley (dislocated shoulder) did not practice.

“(Cruz) had a bounce-back day today,” said Head Coach Ben McAdoo. “He’s out there running on the side and looked pretty good. Of course, you’d like to get him in team reps and individual, but we’ll progress that way…He was able to do a little bit more today than he has…We’ll see how he wakes up and how he got through today.”

“(Pugh) wasn’t out at practice today, so it’s serious if he’s not practicing,” said McAdoo. “I don’t know that the scan showed anything, but I’m not a doctor.”

Fullback Nikita Whitlock (burner) returned to practice.

Some snippets from various media sources:

  • With Justin Pugh not practicing, Bobby Hart was the first-team left guard.
  • Quarterback Eli Manning connected with wide receiver Odell Beckham on a deep pass, beating safety/cornerback Bennett Jackson. Manning also hit wide receiver Myles White deep. (VIDEO)
  • Kelvin Sheppard was the middle linebacker with the first-team defense and also in there with the first-team nickel defense.
  • Bennett Jackson, who was playing corner today, intercepted quarterback Logan Thomas in 7-on-7 drills. (VIDEO)
  • Wide receiver Anthony Dable made a leaping catching on a crossing pattern over the middle.

The transcript of Ben McAdoo’s press conference on Wednesday is available in The Corner Forum while the video is available at

Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and at


The Giants practice on Thursday at 11:15 AM. There is no media availability on Friday as the team will be traveling to Buffalo for Saturday’s preseason game against the Bills.

Oct 232014
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Pat Flaherty, New York Giants (July 28, 2013)

Pat Flaherty – © USA TODAY Sports Images Interviews with New York Giants Position Coaches: The video of recent interviews with the following team position coaches is available from

  • Tight Ends Coach Kevin M. Gilbride (Video)
  • Offensive Line Coach Pat Flaherty (Video)

Articles on the New York Giants Position Coach Interviews:

Articles on the New York Giants Offense:

Article on WR Odell Beckham: Expectations keep soaring for Odell Beckham Jr. by Art Stapleton of The Bergen Record

Article on WR Victor Cruz: Giants’ Victor Cruz talks about life on sidelines by Art Stapleton of The Bergen Record

Article on TE Larry Donnell: Progress by Giants’ Larry Donnell is lesson in what development means by Dan Graziano of

Article on the New York Giants 2014 NFL Draft: ‘Finding Giants’: Explaining the selections of Odell Beckham, Andre Williams and the 2014 NFL Draft by Jordan Raanan of

Article on Former New York Giants General Manager George Young: The ludicrous reason Giants legend kept out of Hall of Fame by Mike Vaccaro of The New York Post

May 042014
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Eric Ebron, North Carolina Tar Heels (September 7, 2013)

TE Eric Ebron – © USA TODAY Sports Images

Articles on New York Giants and the 2014 NFL Draft:

Article on the New York Giants Tight Ends: Where do the Giants stand at the tight end position? by Jordan Raanan of

Article on LT Will Beatty: Giants’ first pick will give hint to concerns about Beatty by Paul Schwartz of The New York Post

Article on Former Giants General Manager George Young: Thirty-five years ago, George Young turned Giants’ fortunes around by Bob Glauber of Newsday

May 202013
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Ahmad Bradshaw, New York Giants (December 30, 2012)

Ahmad Bradshaw – © USA TODAY Sports Images

The NFL Salary Cap and the New York Giants: In today’s NFL, the salary cap rules all. The NFL salary cap is an opponent that many front offices have simply dealt with on an intermediate level, a few have mastered, and a few more have fallen to ruin against as a result of mismanagement. It has risen $88.392 million over the course of 19 years from $34.608 million back in 1994 to $123 million in 2013. Over that time, we’ve seen the New York Giants deal with it to varying degrees. George Young clearly had issues dealing with it, when a bloodletting took place in its first year, when in the Spring of 1994 Giants fans experienced their first casualty of the cap era: the release of Phil Simms, who incidentally was coming off of the second Pro Bowl year of his career in 1993, which turned out to be the final season in his distinguished career (This Day in Football: Giants cut Phil Simms). Reality quickly sunk in for Giants fans with respect to the cap: “if Phil Simms could get cut, then anybody can.” The cap’s influence on free agency was a reason why players like Dave Meggett, Myron Guyton, and Mark Collins walked in free agency as well despite the Giants still wanting to retain them.

Once Ernie Accorsi took over as GM, things started to clear up cap-wise. That then carried over to this regime headed by GM Jerry Reese and Assistant GM (formerly titled cap analyst) Kevin Abrams. We now see a team that is shrewdly managed, with solid drafting and wisely signed free agent additions. What we also see as a result of the cap is the know-how that is required to keep a team with a franchise QB in his prime years competitively balanced when it comes to knowing when to let certain veteran players walk in free agency. The New York Giants did that this offseason with Kenny Phillips and Osi Umenyiora. The ins and outs of navigating the NFL salary cap are numerous though. The best thing to keep in mind when it comes to understanding the underlying motivation for people in NFL front offices is younger and cheaper. That is why it is important to find talent via the draft, rookie free agency, and through prudent veteran free agent acquisitions (something which is often overlooked by many fans). Keeping track of these ins and outs is something that is also key. Following these moves as they are made is not difficult. However, what can be difficult at times is understanding how these decisions are arrived at. This brings us to mapping out roster distribution and cap numbers.

There are several rules that teams – specifically cap analysts – must adhere to when it comes to assisting in team building and roster management. They revolve around the Top 51 rule, when it is in effect during the off-season (which is 7 to 8 months of a calendar year), and the regular season salary cap rules from a team’s first regular season game to its last regular season or post-season game of a given year. Here is an article for it that explains it well, along with some other basics:  Explaining The NFL’s Salary Cap” by Dan Durkin.

What is also important to understand, but from a fan’s standpoint, is the fact that cap numbers are not the same as salary. A cap number is calculation of how the money that a player earns counts towards the salary cap, and includes within it a portion of any number of bonuses, along with whatever guaranteed base salary a given player receives (a.k.a. “cap spending dollars” as opposed to “cash spending dollars”). A player’s salary has nothing to do with the calculations that are taken into account to come up with a given player’s cap number. Instead it has to do with a player’s “Paragraph 5” salary. I refer readers to this excellently written article by Jason Fitzgerlad from regarding the matter: A Guide to the NFL Salary Cap.

I’ll also provide a direct link to the Collective Bargaining Agreement agreed upon by the players and owners: 2011 NFL CBA (agreed upon on August 4, 2011). This latest CBA has been the source of much discussion since its ratification almost two years ago, and there has been a lot analysis regarding what the players gained (mostly lost) since it has been in effect. I’ll table an article on that though for some time in the future. What needs to be mentioned regarding the understanding of the cap itself is that it is not covered enough in the mainstream media. What we see regarding its implications is only touched upon very briefly at best. There’s nothing sexy about it to those who cover the team. It is indeed a shame that this is the case because in actuality there is no single more important factor in play when it comes to understanding how a team is built both in the short-term as well as the long-term, and what factors go into determining a team’s decision making regarding its personnel. It is for this reason that you see specialized websites specifically for the discussion and analysis of the salary cap with respect to the league as a whole and for specific teams.

One such website that stands out for the overall discussion of the league as a whole is It includes both quantitative as well as qualitative analysis of the salary cap as it pertains to the entire league. I have a personal salary cap blog that I started up this month titled New York Giants Salary Cap Central which is my recent attempt to replicate this quantitative and qualitative approach that Jason Fitzgerald has done with his website, except it’s for a specific team, the Giants. There is also, but it lacks in any kind of qualitative discussion (at the least the free part anyway). It also directly lifted the numbers from, as per this article: Site News: Explaining my issues with another website.

Hopefully, a cap section on BBI can function to serve the purpose of gathering information from different places that serve to facilitate the increased understanding of how the cap works and its effect on the Giants’ overall decision making with respect to putting together their roster as whole. It’s one thing to list the order of the cap numbers on the team in such a section – which I intend to do – but it’s another thing to qualitatively break down and analyze patterns that are related to each player’s overall cap situation with respect to the Giants and their long-term and short-term plans for each player. Each year situations change, but teams try their best to control how players fit into the overall scheme of their plans. Hopefully, a cap section on BBI can serve to accumulate a decent enough amount of information so Giants fans who frequent the website can understand how the Giants’ cap situation reflects and determines the moves they make.

Personally, I look forward to spearheading the creation of such a section here on BBI. Currently, there is no other website on the internet which focuses on such a specific topic. In the coming weeks and months that will change for the better. Websites that focus on the cap for the other teams in the NFC East will be linked here, so that fans understand how the inter-divisional competition fares with respect to their respective cap situations. I encourage people to read and ask questions about the information contained herein; questions will serve to help to drive the content that is put out in this section, and make it a truly interactive experience for readers, rather than one which driven by individual whims alone (that’s what my cap blog linked above is for). It will be fun to integrate this new section on the cap here on BBI. My hope is that readers will find it equally fun and interesting to read.