Oct 292020
 
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Will Hernandez, New York Giants (October 7, 2018)

Will Hernandez – © USA TODAY Sports

WILL HERNANDEZ TESTS POSITIVE FOR COVID…
New York Giants left guard Will Hernandez has tested positive for COVID and been sent home. He was also officially placed on the Reserve/COVID-19 List. Seven other players and two coaches were also sent home as a precaution.

The Giants issued the following written statement:

“Late last night, we were notified that a Giants player tested positive for COVID-19. The player was immediately self-isolated, and the contact tracing process was initiated. All of the player’s close contacts were identified and were informed to remain home today. Those individuals will participate in meetings remotely. We are working closely with the NFL’s Chief Medical Officer regarding next protocol steps. Quest Diagnostics Training Center will remain open, and the rest of the team will follow their normal practice and meeting schedule.”

The two coaches are reported to be Outside Linebackers Coach Bret Bielema and Defensive Backs Coach Jerome Henderson. Aside from Hernandez, offensive linemen Nick Gates, Spencer Pulley, Shane Lemieux, Cam Fleming, and Andrew Thomas did not practice and were sent home. The other two players were not identified by the team, but are believed to be Practice Squad players offensive lineman Chad Slade and wide receiver Binjimen Victor.

“We’ve been fortunate in that there’s really no high-risk guys within the tracer contacts,” said Head Coach Joe Judge. “We have some precautions we have to take as a team. We’re optimistic to get all these guys back. We’re operating that we’re going to have them back right now.”

OCTOBER 29, 2020 NEW YORK GIANTS INJURY REPORT…
Officially, RB Devonta Freeman (ankle), OG Will Hernandez (positive COVID test), OC Nick Gates (COVID quarantine), OC Spencer Pulley (COVID quarantine), OG Shane Lemieux (COVID quarantine), RT Cam Fleming (COVID quarantine), and LT Andrew Thomas (COVID quarantine) did not practice on Thursday.

WR Sterling Shepard (shoulder/toe), WR C.J. Board (concussion), CB Darnay Holmes (neck), and S Adrian Colbert (shoulder) were limited in practice.

HEAD COACH JOE JUDGE…
The transcript of Joe Judge’s press conference on Thursday is available in The Corner Forum while the video is available on YouTube.

NEW YORK GIANTS ASSISTANT COACHES ADDRESS THE MEDIA…
A video clip compilation of the media sessions with the following New York Giants assistant coaches on Wednesday is available at Giants.com:

  • Quarterback Coach Jerry Schuplinski
  • Running Backs Coach Burton Burns
  • Wide Receivers Coach Tyke Tolbert
  • Tight Ends Coach Freddie Kitchens
  • Offensive Line Coach Marc Colombo
  • Defensive Line Coach Sean Spencer
  • Outside Linebackers Coach/Senior Assistant Bret Bielema
  • Inside Linebackers Coach Coach Kevin Sherrer
  • Defensive Backs Coach Jerome Henderson

THE PLAYERS SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and on Giants.com:

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
The New York Giants practice on Friday afternoon (12:30-2:30PM). Head Coach Joe Judge, the team’s coordinators, and select players will also address the media.

Oct 132020
 
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Austin Mack, New York Giants (August 23, 2020)

Austin Mack – © USA TODAY Sports

GIANTS SIGN AUSTIN MACK TO 53-MAN ROSTER, CUT DAMION RATLEY…
The New York Giants have signed wide receiver Austin Mack from the team’s Practice Squad. To make room for Mack, the Giants waived wide receiver Damion Ratley.

The Giants signed Mack as an undrafted rookie free agent after the 2020 NFL Draft.

The 6’2”, 200-pound Ratley was originally drafted in the 6th round of the 2018 NFL Draft by the Browns. In 2018-2019, Ratley played in 26 regular-season games with six starts, accruing 25 catches for 344 yards and one touchdown. The Giants claimed Ratley off of waivers from the Cleveland Browns in early September 2020. He played in all five games this year, catching just four passes for 63 yards.

NEW YORK GIANTS ASSISTANT COACHES ADDRESS THE MEDIA…
A video clip compilation of the media sessions with the following New York Giants assistant coaches is available at Giants.com:

  • Quarterback Coach Jerry Schuplinski
  • Running Backs Coach Burton Burns
  • Wide Receivers Coach Tyke Tolbert
  • Tight Ends Coach Freddie Kitchens
  • Offensive Line Coach Marc Colombo
  • Defensive Line Coach Sean Spencer
  • Outside Linebackers Coach/Senior Assistant Bret Bielema
  • Inside Linebackers Coach Coach Kevin Sherrer
  • Defensive Backs Coach Jerome Henderson

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
The players return to practice on Wednesday. Head Coach Joe Judge and select players will also address the media.

Sep 292020
 
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Blake Martinez, New York Giants (September 27, 2020)

Blake Martinez – © USA TODAY Sports

NEW YORK GIANTS SIGN CB MADRE HARPER…
Although not officially announced yet, the New York Giants have signed cornerback Madre Harper off of the Practice Squad of the Las Vegas Raiders. The 22-year old, 6’1”, 196-pound Harper was signed by the Raiders as an undrafted rookie free agent after the 2020 NFL Draft.

NEW YORK GIANTS ASSISTANT COACHES ADDRESS THE MEDIA…
Video clips of the media sessions with the following New York Giants assistant coaches are available at Giants.com:

  • Quarterback Coach Jerry Schuplinski (Video)
  • Running Backs Coach Burton Burns (Video)
  • Wide Receivers Coach Tyke Tolbert (Video)
  • Tight Ends Coach Freddie Kitchens (Video)
  • Offensive Line Coach Marc Colombo (Video)
  • Defensive Line Coach Sean Spencer (Video)
  • Outside Linebackers Coach/Senior Assistant Bret Bielema (Video)
  • Inside Linebackers Coach Coach Kevin Sherrer (Video)
  • Defensive Backs Coach Jerome Henderson (Video)

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
The players return to practice on Wednesday. Head Coach Joe Judge and select players will also address the media.

Sep 222020
 
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Saquon Barkley, New York Giants (September 14, 2020)

Saquon Barkley – © USA TODAY Sports

GIANTS PLACE SAQUON BARKLEY ON INJURED RESERVE…
As expected, the New York Giants have placed running back Saquon Barkley on Injured Reserve. Barkley tore the ACL, partially tore the meniscus, and sprained the MCL in his right knee in the game against the Chicago Bears last Sunday. He will soon undergo surgery in a few weeks once swelling in his knee has gone down.

To fill that vacancy on the 53-man roster, the Giants signed cornerback Ryan Lewis from the Practice Squad. The 6’0”, 195-pound Lewis was originally signed by the Arizona Cardinals as an undrafted rookie free agent after the 2017 NFL Draft. He has spent time with the Cardinals (2017), New England Patriots (2017-2018), Buffalo Bills (2018), Indianapolis Colts (2019), Philadelphia Eagles (2019), Miami Dolphins (2019), and Washington Football Team (2020). Lewis has played in 20 NFL regular-season games with two starts, accruing 43 tackles, eight pass defenses, and one interception.

The Giants also signed linebacker Jermaine Grace to the Practice Squad and terminated the Practice Squad contract of offensive lineman Tyler Haycraft.

The 26-year old, 6’1”, 223-pound Grace was originally signed as an undrafted rookie free agent by the Atlanta Falcons after the 2017 NFL Draft. The much traveled Grace has spent time with the Falcons (2017, 2018-2019), Indianapolis Colts (2017), Cleveland Browns (2018, 2019-2020), and Seattle Seahawks (2018, 2019). Grace has played in 24 regular-season games with no starts, accruing eight tackles.

Haycraft was signed by the Giants as an undrafted rookie free agent after the 2020 NFL Draft.

NEW YORK GIANTS ASSISTANT COACHES ADDRESS THE MEDIA…
Video clips of the media sessions with the following New York Giants assistant coaches are available at Giants.com:

  • Quarterback Coach Jerry Schuplinski (Video)
  • Running Backs Coach Burton Burns (Video)
  • Wide Receivers Coach Tyke Tolbert (Video)
  • Tight Ends Coach Freddie Kitchens (Video)
  • Offensive Line Coach Marc Colombo (Video)
  • Defensive Line Coach Sean Spencer (Video)
  • Outside Linebackers Coach/Senior Assistant Bret Bielema (Video)
  • Inside Linebackers Coach Coach Kevin Sherrer (Video)
  • Defensive Backs Coach Jerome Henderson (Video)

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
The players return to practice on Wednesday. Head Coach Joe Judge and select players will also address the media.

Aug 232020
 
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Dion Lewis, New York Giants (August 23, 2020)

Dion Lewis – Courtesy of New York Giants

AUGUST 23, 2020 NEW YORK GIANTS TRAINING CAMP MEDIA PRACTICE NOTES…
Some snippets from various media and team sources:

  • Light practice today in helmets and shorts. It was more of a fast-paced walk-through.
  • The Giants provided a 20-minute video on today’s practice on YouTube.

INJURY REPORT…
Fullback Eli Penny (unknown), linebacker Ryan Connelly (unknown), and cornerback Prince Smith (unknown) did not practice.

Head Coach Joe Judge was asked about Connelly missing Friday’s scrimmage and today’s light practice. “You know what, first off, I’m not going to go into any specific injuries really at any time,” replied Judge. “But I’ll say this, we had several players that we kind of managed a little bit different today. We came off a long, hard week, a hard scrimmage the other day. We gave them a day off yesterday. Today was really a day to mentally take a step forward, physically get our bodies right, then we’re going to hit the field again tomorrow. We’ll see where everyone’s at tonight after a couple days off. We’ll approach practice tomorrow accordingly for everyone individually.”

THE COACHES SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following coaches are available in The Corner Forum and on YouTube:

THE PLAYERS SPEAK…
Transcripts and video clips of the media sessions with the following players are available in The Corner Forum and on YouTube:

WHAT’S UP NEXT…
Giants practice on Monday morning (9:45-11:45AM). Head Coach Joe Judge and several assistant coaches and players will also address the media.

ARTICLES…

 

Aug 132020
 
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New York Giants Training Camp (August 11, 2020)

New York Giants Training Camp – Courtesy of New York Giants

AUGUST 13, 2020 JERRY SCHUPLINSKI CONFERENCE CALL…
New York Giants Quarterbacks Coach Jerry Schuplinski addressed the media on Thursday (see video at Giants.com and YouTube):

Q: You’ve had a lot of work with veteran quarterbacks. What’s the biggest difference with working with a young quarterback like Daniel?

A: I think the biggest thing I’ve learned is everybody is a little bit different. Certainly, the vets have a lot more experience with some things. They’ve seen a lot of things in defenses, certain alignments and coverages. I think your approach with everybody, whether they are a vet or a young player, you start from square one and go, as you keep growing and you keep learning what they know and what they don’t know. I’d say with Daniel, he’s done a nice job. He’s really well prepared, he got a lot of great experience last year on that and that’s been really helpful. Certainly, the vets have seen a lot more, he doesn’t have as much game experience. I’d say he is very well prepared in everything he’s doing, and he has a lot of knowledge base underneath him so far.

Q: How can he make a big jump in year two that a lot of NFL quarterbacks experience?

A: Hard to say because we weren’t here last year. Right now, with him, we’re just really focusing hard on understanding the system. He’s putting in a lot of great work, as all those guys are. Getting the communication, the verbiage down, understanding the calls, making the right huddle calls, making the right checks at the line of scrimmage, understanding the fronts and alignments. Getting the communication down with the line, the receivers, all that stuff. Just trying to make sure we have the basics. Coach Garrett always talks about the alphabet. We have to get the alphabet down before we form words, before we form sentences, paragraphs, all that kind of stuff. That’s really what we’re focusing on now. I think if he gets that down as he’s continuing to do and all those guys do, I think we’ll have a good shot to work fundamentally as we’re working on, to get the whole system down and be productive in it.

Q: For your purposes when you go to your room, what kind of philosophies do you bring to the quarterback room? What do you want to see? How do you approach the offseason in terms of what you have seen from your guys in the past? What do you want to see from your quarterbacks?

A: I would say the biggest thing philosophy wise, make no mistake about it, this is Jason’s offense and Jason’s system. It’s been really great working with him, learning this system and growing in this system. He’s been really receptive and open to the ideas that all of us have brought to the table. This biggest thing for me in general is just being fundamentally sound. Understanding things that are pretty basic to the position in terms of footwork, drops, drop depth, being a good, sound mechanical thrower. Ball security is a huge thing that Coach Judge preaches, that Jason preaches, that we preach. Just really understanding the importance of all that stuff, why that’s important. Also understanding defenses, what that means. Is there certain tips or cues that we can pick up to help us play better, quicker, faster.

Q: You mentioned ball security. Without playing live football, how can you try to improve Daniel’s decision making as far as those split-second decisions of holding onto it a half-second longer, letting go of it, make the throw, put it up for grabs, don’t. How do you work on that as a coach, especially when you are not on the field yet?

A: It’s been challenging in the spring. But I think you have to approach it, kind of like I said before, part of ball security is understanding what you’re looking at on the other side of the ball. Understanding what the defense is in and what they are trying to do based on their coverages. Whether they are a deep spot drop zone team or a tight man to man team, what that means and what’s that going to mean for our reads and what we need to do. This spring we spent a lot of time diving into the system, learning the basics of it. Learning what are reads are on certain plays. We’re kind of able to do some stuff on air, you’re looking at timing, making the right decisions on air in terms of timing. Where we think the ball would go versus a certain coverage. When we get out there, we’ll continue to work on it. I think it’s a thing we do with all the quarterbacks, just harp on the little details all the time.

Q: Where do you fall on willingness to take a hit? Daniel has shown that he has not been afraid to take one. That can lead to mistakes, too. How are you coaching that?

A: I admire his toughness, he’s a tough guy. He works hard, he’s really passionate about the game. I think, ultimately, we need to be smart with the ball as a quarterback room and as a quarterback, in general. We have to make the right decisions. I think there is a time to get down and protect to ball, and I think there is a time to go ahead and go forward in certain situations, a short yardage thing when you have to get a first down. I think the biggest thing when we do have that opportunity to go through is really covering up the ball and make sure we take good care of it. The last thing we want is the ball on the ground.

Q: Daniel put in effort to gain about 10 pounds of muscle. In your experience, how can that benefit him in his second year. Especially when you look back at film and how he played last year. How can the extra muscle help him moving forward?

A: It’s never something that we discussed with him about trying to get bigger and stronger. I think it’s probably a progression of being in our strength program and our conditioning. He’s a really good worker and one of the best I’ve seen from a young guy. I think that’s a testament to him. In terms of what it does for him on the field, hopefully it makes him a little more durable when he is taking hits in there. It’s not something we ever really talked about, that he has to put on a certain amount of weight. I did notice and I remarked to him the other day, when I first got here in the winter, I got to meet him briefly and talked to him. He does look like he’s a little bit bigger. He definitely looked like he got a little bit bigger, a little more solid. We’ll see how that relates to him. You hope it makes him a little more durable, but it was never a discussion we had with him.

Q: Every quarterbacks coach has his own philosophy as far as stance and mechanics. I’m just going off of video and pictures, what obviously doesn’t tell you a whole lot. It looks like Daniel is crouching a little bit more in his stance? Is that something you worked on with him to change? What are some other things you have him doing to change his mechanics?

A: With all the guys and with any quarterback, they have to feel comfortable back there. There’s certain points that we can give out. You want to get a decent base to you, have decent knee bend. You want to be comfortable taking the snap, you want your hands loose, you don’t want them overly too tight. There’s certain pointers that we give out. I think it’s more of a feel thing. You see how they are, how they’re comfortable, how the centers are. Just in terms of their stances and taking snaps and all that. Like I said, you’re really just trying to work on a good wide base, make that feel comfortable, decent knee bend. Really what allows them to get back from the pocket as fast as they can.

Q: You have been around some really good quarterbacks in your career between Tom (Brady), Jacoby (Brisset) and Jimmy Garoppolo. Is there an underlying trait that is consistent with all those guys that helps get them to where they’re at? For you as a coach, what did you learn from being around guys like that? Just kind of as a young coach coming up in the business.

A: Preparation is so key. I really think it’s one of the hardest positions in all of sports, is to play quarterback. No matter what team you are on, what system you are in, you are putting a lot on the quarterback. Ultimately, when the ball is snapped, they are touching it every play, they have the ball in their hands. You are relying on them to make the right decisions and make good decisions. I did have the opportunity to look at some guys prepare, how hard they work, how much they knew what to expect what was coming from a certain defense and how they could help them. Every quarterback is different. I’m pretty excited about the ones we have. That group is working really hard. They are buying into everything we are trying to tell them, and Daniel is no different. He’s a great worker and I think he is on the right track in terms of his preparation.

Q: You have been credited with helping Jimmy Garoppolo get caught up when he was young and Jacoby the same way. What’s your approach with young quarterbacks? How do you go about teaching them and getting them up to speed?

A: I think the first thing you have to do is build a relationship with them before you even worry about the X’s and O’s part of it. It’s no different than anybody else. They have to know that you have their best interest at heart. You want them to know that they can trust you. That you are there to help them. You have to be able to prove to them that the information you give them can help them be successful, that’s the first part of it. It’s really just foundational, the biggest thing you can do is have a good foundation of a system, of an offense. Understanding what the formations are, what the calls are. What we need to do, what breaks us down on a certain protection. Where could our issues be, why we want certain plays in certain directions. You just keep hammering the foundation, the foundation, the foundation. Once you can help them build a foundation, have a general understanding of protections, run game, and what we’re doing. I think the passing game continues to build off of that. Really just getting the foundation down and taking our time with that.

Q: In this environment, backup quarterbacks could be especially important. You guys happen to have three experienced ones in the room. Are you fortunate to have guys with experience? Maybe a quick synopsis of what you see from these guys.

A: I like these guys. I’m excited about what we have in the room. A lot of the discussion has been about Daniel today and I certainly understand that. Those other guys are awesome. Colt is a good veteran, he’s seen a lot in this league, he understands a lot. He works really hard in the meetings. He pays great attention, asks really great questions. He’s probably the question-asker of the group, but I don’t know if he’s always asking it for himself. He’s seen things and knows things might come up and so he’s not afraid to asks questions. Cooper has a lot of experience in our system. He still comes to work every day, is learning and learning new things and growing, and opening up his communication. Alex, who has been here, is a really sharp guy mentally. Really understands the game of football. We’re all learning about each other. Daniel and Alex were in the same room last year. The rest of us weren’t, Jason, me, Colt and Cooper. We’re all learning about each other while growing together. It’s really fun so far. Those guys, we couldn’t ask for anything more. Every chance they get, they are working hard and they are in there studying.

AUGUST 13, 2020 TYKE TOLBERT CONFERENCE CALL…
New York Giants Wide Receivers Coach Tyke Tolbert addressed the media on Thursday (see video at Giants.com and YouTube):

Q: I know a lot of people are probably going to wonder about Darius Slayton. I want to ask you about Corey Coleman, a guy who’s coming off the ACL. I know you just got him on the field recently. He was a guy who last year looked good until he had that injury. What have you seen from him running around out there? Is he close to being back to where he was before the injury? What are his chances of cracking into this group?

A: I think Corey did a really good job this offseason and this summer, being with the trainers, getting rehabbed and getting ready to go. There’s only so much he can do with all of the COVID stuff, so he still had to do a lot of work on his own, which he did. I think Corey is pretty much back to where he was before he got injured. I’m just looking forward for Corey to go out there and compete like everybody else. He’s making strides right now. He’s going to go out there and practice hard and do what he has to do. With everyone competing, I’m looking forward for him to go out there and make some plays for us and see where the chips fall.

Q: You have three undrafted rookie free agents (Binjimen Victor, Austin Mack, Derrick Dillon). Has anybody kind of jumped out at you? What have you seen from those three guys?

A: They’re all working very hard. Two guys came from the same college, so they push each other. Another one came from the Princeton of the south down there, LSU. They’re all doing a really good job. They’re all competing, they’re all studying. I like to see good, young guys with a chip on their shoulder to go out there and compete. That’s what they’re doing right now. They’re always working hard and trying to get better.

Q: You’ve worked for a lot of different head coaches now in the NFL. Just your thoughts so far on working with Joe, and maybe what’s different about him than other guys you’ve worked with so far?

A: I don’t like to compare things. I think just working for Coach Judge has been an honor, to be able to be here and work for him. He’s very well-organized, he’s very structured, very planned with what he has to do. We know from the staff exactly what we have to do day in and day out. I think a lot of us are responding better that way. I just think being around him and him knowing a lot of football, he’s taught me a couple things being in those special teams meetings, which I hadn’t been a part of very much in the past. But hearing different things and situations and stuff come up, I’ve learned a lot. I’m very honored to be able to be here and work for him.

Q: He has you guys going to meetings with other position groups or other parts of the game as well?

A: Every coach pitches in with everything. All special teams and as far as our positions and everything as well. This coaching staff, we work together very well. Everybody works together to help each other. We’re just one big organization helping out wherever we can.

Q: You have a group there, you have some veterans with Sterling (Shepard) and Golden (Tate). When you look at those two guys, what do you see? The fact that you were not able to get those guys on the field together very often, what do you see the potential is if you can get those guys on the field for 16 games?

A: I think it’s a great potential. Coach Judge mentioned something earlier to us about the team with the best advantage is the healthiest team. We like all our guys to be as healthy as possible because when you have everybody healthy and everybody on the field at the same time, then you’ll be able to use people in different ways. I’m looking forward to those guys being out on the field together and being healthy and having everyone contribute again, because we believe the healthiest team will be the team that has the biggest advantage. Health is priority number one right now.

Q: The fact that you were kept from the previous regime, how meaningful was that to you? Is it a little strange, you get used to something for two years and then you look around and now a lot of those guys are gone. It has to be a little weird.

A: Well, that’s the NFL. That’s the business we chose. Again, I’m very fortunate to be able to stay here with Coach Judge. I’m very fortunate to not have to move my daughter before her senior year. All of those things kind of clicked in. I’m just excited to be here. I’m excited to work with this new coaching staff that comes from different places, been knowing each other from across the league but now we have a chance to work with each other. I’m very excited that Coach Judge is leading this organization. I’m just ready to do whatever I can to help us win some football games.

Q: Darius Slayton. A year ago, you were trying to get him on the field off of a hamstring injury. We know what he did during the season. What is different about Darius the player today that you’re coaching than maybe what he was last year when you had to teach him the NFL basically?

A: The difference for Darius is, it’s year two, obviously, and it’s game experience. He did get some game experience in the NFL last year. At this point of time last year, he hadn’t played an NFL snap. Now, he has some game experience. He can go out there and he knows the speed of the game and how the defensive backs play in the NFL. That’s, to me, the biggest difference. He’s a smart guy. He’s starting the new offense, as we all are. But we’re looking forward to Darius getting to compete. Last year was last year. It’s gone. This is a new year. He’s out there competing with everybody else. Again, being healthy is the biggest thing. If we can stay healthy and have all our guys out there on the field, I think we’ll go out there and we’ll play pretty hard and play well. Let’s see what happens.

Q: Did he prove last year that the knock about him just being a fast guy out there and not being a route-runner, did he prove that that was a myth?

A: I don’t know if he proved anything. I think because of him being able to have a year under his belt and see the defenses and see how he was able to adjust along the way… Again, I say that last year was last year. This year is always a prove-it… He has to prove himself tomorrow, just like I have to prove myself tomorrow. We always have to prove ourselves every single day. I think with Darius and with all of the receivers, whether it’s Darius, Shep, Cody White we just signed, everyone is going to go out there, work hard, prepare and stay healthy, and give ourselves the best chance to put the best people out there to help us win games.

AUGUST 13, 2020 FREDDIE KITCHENS CONFERENCE CALL…
New York Giants Tight Ends Coach Freddie Kitchens addressed the media on Thursday (see video at Giants.com and YouTube):

Q: Can you talk about your quick journey here with the Giants? Head coach, what you learned, what you know more about yourself, and what you can take from that experience and maybe help Joe Judge, who’s a first-year head coach?

A: I gained a lot of experience last year. I’m really fortunate to have gotten that experience. I’m looking forward to bringing everything, not just last year, but my previous years of coaching. Anything Joe needs or any questions he asks, all I can give him is my experience from that. All of us have had experiences along the way, some good, some bad. Joe’s done a great job surrounding himself with people that he trusts, that he can ask questions to, and will give him honest answers.

Q: Your experience last year as a head coach, some good, some bad? What was the ratio there you would say?

A: I don’t want to put figures on anything. I enjoyed my time and the opportunity in Cleveland. I appreciate the opportunity that I was given. I gained valuable experience moving forward. But I’m concentrating on the New York Football Giants, which I’m excited to be here. What a great organization. All the history that goes into the organization since 1925, I love that kind of stuff. It’s great to be here.

Q: What’s it like going back to being a single position coach and not having everyone looking at you for answers?

A: I’m a football coach. I don’t really get into that kind of thing. I’m here to coach football. I’ve always been a football coach. I don’t get into that sort of thing. I’m in charge of my own position, everyone is in charge of their positions, the coordinators do their job. It just takes everyone doing their job to be successful, and that’s what we’re going to try to do. I’m here to do a job, and that’s to coach the tight ends.

Q: How much is being a head coach again part of your aspirations? Also, what are your initial thoughts on when you see Evan Engram?

A: It goes back to the way I’ve always been. I’ve always tried to stay in the moment, and right now, I’m here with the New York Giants. I’m going to try to get the most out of the players that I coach and help this staff any way I can. I’m here for the team. I feel like I’ve always been like that, a team-oriented guy. As far as Evan Engram, he’s a team-oriented guy. He’s been working his tail off to get better each and every day, and he’s done a good job of just staying in the moment, like we all should be doing. Just try to get a little better each day and see where you’re at in a couple of weeks.

Q: You don’t see a head coach go to being a position coach too often from one year to the next. I’m curious was there any thought of sitting out this year? I’m just curious how you landed with the Giants and what made this the only option for you?

A: Like I said, I’m a ball coach. I take pride in being a football coach, which in theory is a teacher. I love teaching, I love teaching guys. There’s no better feeling in the world of teaching someone something and watching them have success with it and see the look on their face. That’s what I take pride in doing. It just worked out perfectly that I knew Joe, I trust Joe, I know Joe’s background and what he believes in. I think we’re aligned pretty well with those sorts of things.

Q: I’m going off of memory here, but you have quite a diverse background. I think you’ve coached every position at some point in your career with the exception of offensive line. Now that you’re focused in on tight ends, which in the NFL they’re asked to do so much and know so much, can you just draw a little bit upon your experience coaching the other positions and just how that’s going to benefit you as you teach the Giants tight ends, especially in this offense?

A: I think coaching nearly all the positions in the past certainly benefits me from the standpoint of knowing what the other positions are thinking and doing. But at the end of the day, any position you coach, it all starts from the ground up, and feet, hands and pad level for the most part. The basics are the same, whether you’re throwing the football or catching the football or trying to block a three technique. It’s all football. It’s all technique-oriented to get the most out of the individual player and to get the most out of themselves. They understand that. So yeah, I can carry knowledge from all the positions I’ve coached. At some point, the tight ends are going to be involved in all of the areas.

Q: Injuries have kind of derailed Evan, and I think at times have frustrated him as well, which is understandable. If he can stay healthy on the field, how good can he be?

A: I think Evan is in the mindset that he should be in, and that’s just getting better today. We’re trying to stay in the moment here with every position, with every player, with every coach, and keep our head down and just work to get better each and every day. Evan has done a good job up to this point in doing that. He did a hell of a job this summer in rehabbing and getting back to where he’s at right now, and just kind of taking it day to day and getting better with his releases, his hand placement, with everything. Every aspect of Evan’s game, we want to try to get better at each and every day. Evan’s done an unbelievable job in staying focused and concentrating on, even more specific to every day, just every rep. He’s done a good job and we’re just going to stay in the moment.

Q: He has every tool, though, right?

A: There are a lot of people who have a lot of tools. If the makeup is not right as far as staying in the moment, the things we’re trying to teach here, stay in the moment and get better each and every day, it doesn’t come to fruition. That’s the only thing that we’re going to try to do here, is just stay in the moment and get better with the tools that anyone has. Everybody has different sets of tools. Whatever your tools are, work to make that set better.

Q: What did you see, what intrigued you about Rysen John when you studied him in the offseason and brought him in? What are the challenges of basically starting from square one with a guy who’s learning a new position?

A: Again, Rysen is the same as with our whole group. He’s trying to get better each and every day. Everyone has different starting spots, but I think Rysen has done an excellent job of coming to work every day and putting his hand down and continuing to work. It all started back in March when we started Zoom calls and stuff. He’s done a great job of learning the system, learning the offense, and continuing to enable himself to give himself the best chance to succeed in every play he takes. He’s done a good job of just working.

Q: You know Baker Mayfield, the NFL player, as well as anyone. Now you’re coaching the Giants with a young quarterback in Daniel Jones. From what you’ve seen, how would you compare those two guys as far as young QBs, how they’re growing, and how they’re developing?

A: I’m not in the comparing business. I enjoyed my time there with Baker. Baker’s an exceptional player, but we have work to do here and I’d rather stay in the moment here with these guys I’m coaching right now. Unbelievable opportunity we have to go to work every day and try to get better each and every day, and that’s what I’m looking forward to. There will be a time down the road to reflect on the past. Right now, we’re staying in the moment.

AUGUST 13, 2020 SEAN SPENCER CONFERENCE CALL…
New York Giants Defensive Line Coach Sean Spencer addressed the media on Thursday (see video at Giants.com and YouTube):

Q: As a guy who has spent your entire career in the college game, have you had other opportunities to come to the NFL? What made this one the one to jump at?

A: I did have a couple opportunities some time ago. Probably like three years ago, an NFL team approached me and I had some conversation with scouts when you have pro days. Asking me if I would ever make the jump. This opportunity, in terms of being a northeast kid, born and raised in the northeast and having worked at Penn State, having the opportunity to work for the New York Giants is like a dream come true. It’s kind of surreal, you go from Penn State to the New York Giants having grown up in this area and recruited in this area. Pat Graham is a longtime friend of mine. I’ve known him since he was a graduate of Yale University. It just always made sense to me.

Q: You’re known as a pretty intense guy from what I gather. Do you have to change anything when you go from coaching college kids to professional adults that are grown men?

A: I can’t change, man. I’m coming hard every day. Those guys know about my energy and they have gotten to experience it a little bit. I told them today that wasn’t a one-time thing yesterday and that it’s going to be like that every day. It’s the way you bring it. You can bring positive energy and be excited without berating somebody. They can feel when you’re upset and feel when you’re happy. I have to coach like that. When I leave the practice field, I have to be completely sweaty or I didn’t do a good job.

Q: What did you know about Joe Judge? Did you have a relationship with him before? What have been your early impressions of him?

A: Obviously, he had a lot of success in New England. I had some guys like Brendan Daly that’s the D-line coach for the Kansas City Chiefs. I never worked with Joe directly, but I had a bunch of guys reach out to me when this opportunity came about. Before I was hired, they told me all the great things about Joe and how he works. He is a highly organized guy, very detailed. It is what it is with him, it’s mapped out how it goes. I really respect that. Obviously, he has learned from some great ones, having worked with Nick Saban and Bill Belichick. I’m excited to work with him.

Q: Looking at the defensive line you have up front, you have some talented guys like Dexter Lawrence, Leonard Williams. What do you see out of these guys and what’s the ceiling for your group? Top to bottom, you can make the case it is one of the deepest position groups on the roster.

A: One of the things I talked about with the guys today, obviously coming into it quote, unquote, we are a talented group. I just told them I am here to help them reach their potential and beyond. I don’t care if you were a high draft pick or you’re a free agent or a middle round guy. I’m here to help you reach your potential and that’s why coach brought me in. I’m going to work with these guys and take them to the next step, whatever that step is. I want to take them to their potential and beyond. This is a great room of guys. I’m truly blessed to have such a great group my first year in the NFL and I’m just excited for it. Just taking them to the next level and working at having them master their craft. I’m excited about that.

Q: What does that look like for a guy like Dexter Lawrence? Last year the staff played him in the middle at nose tackle and defensive end in some other spots. What do you see in his skill set and what’s the ceiling for him?

A: I don’t know what the ceiling will be for him, but I’m just telling you I feel like he is one of the more athletic kids that I’ve seen. That I have had the opportunity to coach. I knew him in high school back in North Carolina. I watched him do a workout and I was amazed at how fluid he was as an athlete. I’m seeing some of the signs of that already. What his ceiling is, I don’t know. We are going to prepare him for the season and I’m going to push him to the brink and try to get the best out of him. Obviously, you guys have seen he is tremendously athletic. We’re going to put everything together. He listens and he’s a sponge for coaching. We’ll make him get to his potential that way.

Q: I wanted to ask you about a common thing with young defensive linemen, sometimes they struggle to finish on the pass rush. We noticed that with Leonard Williams. What are some of the things that you can teach these guys to help them with finishing the pass rush and getting the ultimate prize, which of course would be the sack.

A: That’s a great point. What I do is I stand on the sideline in practice and if they don’t get to the quarterback, I chase them to the ball. That’s a good drill, it’s called ‘I’m going to chase you to the ball until you get to where you are supposed to go.’ You bring up a great point about finishing on the quarterback and finishing drills. Everything that you do, if you do it with a finish, you create the muscle memory. Like you said, the ultimate prize is getting to the quarterback, so to speak. Also, we want to make sure they are functioning within the defense. We don’t want them to go outside of what we are asking them to do schematically. Finishing on the quarterback is a good thing, finishing on the ball carrier is a good thing. Like I said, I know it sounds cliché, but I’m going to chase them to the ball.

Q: You are going to do that when they are on the field actually playing?

A: No, it’s muscle memory. In the back of their head, they will know that coach will be chasing me right now so they are going to run after the quarterback.

Q: With Leoanrd Williams in particular, a high draft, obviously the Jets were willing to trade him to the Giants. How can you unleash the Leonard Williams that teams expect to get and he’s almost always that close?

A: I think in the offseason in zoom and things like that because it’s a different situation, I was able to develop quite the relationship with Leonard. I think he knows I have his best interests in mind. He wants to have success. No one goes out on the field saying I was this high draft pick, I haven’t reached my potential. He wants to be great. He is detailed in the meetings, he asks great questions. He’s into football. I’m here to help him take his next step, whatever that is. He’s a talented guy and I’m excited to work with him.

Q: Do you have to convey to these guys that it’s not okay with you that they are close?

A: Yeah, you definitely let them know. I haven’t had them in practice yet, so I obviously I never go back on those things. I just use that as a barometer that I need to look and study to see what I need to do to make them the best they can be. I really don’t go back and say, ‘hey, you didn’t do a lot of finishing last year.’ I know, I saw the film. It’s a new year, a new start. All I’ll have is what they put on the tape for me in practice now.

Q: You know Cam Brown as well as anyone on this staff from your time with him at Penn State. What can you say the Giants are getting in Cam Brown? What’s been your impression so far of him?

A: Being with Cam at Penn State and I was a part of the group of individuals that helped recruit him. I have a longstanding relationship with Cam. I don’t want to make any predictions for Cam or anything like that. I can tell you personally he is a very conscientious individual. He’s a student of the game and he will be the ultimate team player. He’ll do whatever you ask and he’s always a team first guy. I can definitely quote myself on saying that, he will be a team first individual.

Q: What do you remember about recruiting him?

A: He was skinny, he was tall and skinny. I asked him if he was a two guard on the basketball court. He gained some weight, he has some muscles now. He wears shirts that don’t fit so his muscles pop out. He’s definitely improved his size. He’s worked at getting stronger in the weight room and just changing his body. I think he’s like 230 right now, he looks great. A funny story I can tell you is his dad can cook. That was some of the best food I’ve ever had in my life.

Q: What did he cook you?

A: I can’t tell that secret because his mom will get mad.

Q: Sounds like his dad was recruiting you instead of the other way around maybe.

A: That was the fun thing about going on those home visits. You get to go to different families and get food and things like that. One kid in particular, we didn’t get to have dinner but that’s another story. We sat there and talked for four hours and no one ate. We just had a couple pieces of cheese. It was different but that’s okay, you’re not expecting to have dinner.

Q: You mentioned earlier that you told the players yesterday’s energy was not an aberration. How did that manifest itself? What happened that you felt like you had to explain that?

A: I was excited. It’s phase 2 and it’s your first, not practice, but you get to move around and do certain things. I had my whole group there. I had been working with a couple of young guys. That was the first time I had got my group on the field at the same time and got to run drills with them. It got me excited. I’m walking around pre-practice in a full sweat, bouncing up and down. I just can’t wait to coach these guys and then I wanted them to understand this is not something I’m just going to do on occasion, this is how they are going to get coached. That’s kind of all I was letting them know, that it wasn’t going to be a day off. I want them to match my energy every day.

Q: Are you going to be okay on Monday?

A: Yeah, I will get a stretch out, a roll out and I’m good to go.

AUGUST 13, 2020 KEVIN SHERRER CONFERENCE CALL…
New York Giants Inside Linebackers  Coach Kevin Sherrer addressed the media on Thursday (see video at Giants.com and YouTube):

Q: This is your first NFL job. What intrigued you about coming to New York, and your thoughts so far on working with Joe Judge?

A: First off, it had to do a lot with Joe. Joe and I have known each other for I’d say 10-12 years, back from when I was coaching high school ball, and we worked together at the University of Alabama. He and I are pretty decent friends. We kept in touch. He was a big part. As far as the attraction to coaching in the NFL, you always want to coach at the highest level. Whether you’re a player, coach, whatever, to compete at that level. Once he got an opportunity and presented that to me, I was really excited. I was really excited about being here as well.

Q: You were obviously with Joe very early in his coaching career. I’m curious, what stood out about him back then? Did you think he had this type of future way back then?

A: It’s kind of funny. Yeah, I really thought he did. But when you think of a guy that’s kind of a friend of yours, a colleague, co-worker, getting a head coaching job with the New York Giants is something that’s really kind of like ‘wow.’ But yeah, early on, Joe has always been an organized guy, very articulate, does a really good job, loves football, a good family guy. He fits the mold, in my opinion.

Q: With Ryan Connelly, obviously, he’s coming off a pretty big injury off of a rookie season. I’m just curious what you’ve seen from him, what you like about him as a player? I’m sure in some circles, you were familiar with him at the college level. What has been Ryan’s ascension here over the first couple weeks of camp?

A: Like all the guys, they’ve done a really good job of coming in and working and kind of understanding what it is that Coach Judge has set down as a foundation of our team. The fundamentals, attention to detail, situational awareness. He’s done a really good job. The training staff did a good job of getting him back in time for once training camp started. But he’s done a really good job, just like all of the guys have in the room of coming in and working and learning as much as they can each day.

Q: You have a lot of new talent here to work with. Guys who can maybe do different things, inside linebacker, outside linebacker, some guys who can play with their hand in the dirt. Can you just give us a little insight into the sorting out process? Obviously, you have to see what they’re doing on the field. But do you also kind of integrate your teaching with what Coach Spencer is doing, what Coach Bielema is doing and so forth?

A: Yeah, a lot of it ties into what Pat Graham has laid down as kind of who we’re going to be defensively. Some of that ties into what our personnel is. Yes, we all kind of collaborate on that. Our skill set that we teach is, again, around the fundamentals that Joe has laid down, just the functional movements of a football player. Yeah, there are times where we pair up with the defensive front, with the outside linebackers, and kind of interchange players, you might say. Ideas, skill coach, the inside and vice versa. It sort of just depends on what’s going on during practice time.

Q: I know you just started working with the guys on the field recently, but how much can you glean from their college film in terms of ‘Ok, this guy is going to be a better fit inside, this guy is going to be a better fit outside,’ and so forth?

A: Obviously, you look for the length on the edge and you look for the change of direction on the inside. But until you actually see those guys in person, you don’t really know. Sometimes they’re bigger or not as big as what you thought they were on film. It’s best to be able to see those guys in person. Once you get them here, then you go, ‘Ok, this guy may be better to train at a couple of different positions,’ whether it be outside, inside, back or things like that. College film is a big part of it, but once you get your eyes and hands on them, you might say that’s the best way to find out.

Q: I know you’re coaching inside linebackers, but are you going to get any joy working with Zo (Lorenzo Carter) again?

A: Yeah. It’s funny because I think I was here maybe a week and he popped in. I hadn’t really seen much of him since we both left the University of Georgia. Lorenzo is a great person, great player, good family. I’m actually looking forward to it. You kind of hope he’s a voice in the locker room that lets players know who you are before you show up.

Mar 062020
 
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Joe Judge, New York Giants (January 9, 2020)

Joe Judge – © USA TODAY Sports

Head Coach Joe Judge

One of the hallmarks of a bottom-tier sports franchise is how often it cycles through new coaches. In the last five years, the Giants have fired three head coaches and more assistant coaches than I care to count. With fan ire now rightfully shifting towards ownership, John Mara took a tremendous gamble in hiring Joe Judge, a 38-year old who has never served as a head coach at any level.

  • 2020-Present: Head Coach, New York Giants
  • 2019: Special Teams Coordinator/Wide Receivers Coach, New England Patriots
  • 2015-2018: Special Teams Coordinator, New England Patriots
  • 2012-2014: Special Teams Assistant, New England  Patriots
  • 2009-2011: Special Teams Assistant/Football Analyst, University of Alabama
  • 2008: Special Teams/Linebackers Coach, Birmingham-Southern College
  • 2005-2007: Graduate Assistant, Mississippi State University

On the surface, Judge’s resume appears almost entirely based on praise from two living football legends who he has worked under: Nick Saban and Bill Belichick. Other than that, Judge served at the coordinator level for only five seasons (2015-2019).

“He’s an excellent coach,” said Belichick. “He understands the game well, works extremely hard and is a very good teacher of fundamentals. Joe picks up concepts and coaching points quickly. He is an exceptional leader and one of the best coaches I have been around. He has been responsible for coaching units comprised of nearly every player on the roster. That requires an ability to handle many moving parts, make constant adjustments and immediate decisions.”

“Joe did a fantastic job for our program early on in our tenure in Tuscaloosa,” said Saban. “He went on to have a lot of success on Bill’s staff in New England. Joe is one of the brightest young coaches in our profession, and I think he will do a tremendous job as the head coach of the New York Giants. They are getting an extremely smart football coach who is very loyal, organized and diligent about getting the job done.”

At least in the short-term, Judge won over many doubting fans during his introductory press conference, evincing a no-nonsense, take-charge attitude and a sense of urgency that seems to have been lacking in recent years. But make no mistake, Mara is taking a big risk here on an unproven commodity with virtually no track record on the offensive and defensive sides of the football.

Offensive Coordinator Jason Garrett

Despite his 85-67 regular-season record as head coach and earning “coach of the year” honors in 2016, most Cowboys fans were eventually glad to see Garrett let go. That said, his temperament and overall ability is probably best suited to offensive coordinator. Hiring Garrett was a major “get” for Judge and the Giants as his very presence gives the coaching staff some much-needed gravitas. Indeed, many had expected the Giants to pursue Garrett for the head coaching vacancy. When asked about Garrett, Judge pointed to Garrett’s ability run multiple schemes, putting pressure on defenses, and being an excellent teacher.

“There were guys I worked with that I came across in my career at both Alabama and at the New England Patriots that worked with Jason through their time in Miami with him,” said Judge. “They consistently all reflected on how smart he is, how great a teacher he is and how his perspective of the game was through a different lens than most coaches. And when he sees it, he’s able to communicate it and paint that mental image to the players. And he does a fantastic job of making in-game adjustments… It’s a great system he brings with great teaching that will allow our players to go out there and play aggressively.”

  • 2020-Present: Offensive Coordinator, New York Giants
  • 2011-2019: Head Coach, Dallas Cowboys
  • 2010: Interim Head Coach, Dallas Cowboys
  • 2008-2010: Assistant Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator, Dallas Cowboys
  • 2007: Offensive Coordinator, Dallas Cowboys
  • 2005-2006: Quarterbacks Coach, Miami Dolphins

Quarterbacks Coach Jerry Schuplinski

After serving four years as an assistant quarterbacks coach with two teams, Judge hired Schuplinski as the primary quarterbacks coach for the Giants. Schuplinski has received praise from former pupils young and old, including Jimmy Garoppolo and Ryan Fitzpatrick. While Schuplinski will be under pressure to develop Daniel Jones, keep in mind that Jason Garrett began his NFL career as both a quarterback and quarterback coach.

“Jerry is an incredible teacher,” said Judge. “He has done a phenomenal job of developing young quarterbacks in this league. He simplifies the game so the quarterback can play fast in terms of understanding our scheme and analyzing the opponent’s defense.”

  • 2020-Present: Quarterbacks Coach, New York Giants
  • 2019: Assistant Quarterbacks Coach, Miami Dolphins
  • 2016-2018: Assistant Quarterbacks Coach, New England Patriots
  • 2013-2015: Coaching Assistant, New England Patriots
  • 2007-2012: Linebackers/Special Teams Coach, Case Western Reserve University
  • 2002-2006: Head Coach, Trinity High School (Ohio)
  • 2000-2001: Running Backs/Special Teams Coach, John Carroll University
Running Backs Coach Burton Burns

The oldest member of the staff, the 67-year old Burns actually transitioned from legendary running backs coach at Alabama to assistant athletic director for football two years ago. Yet the coaching bug appears to still be in his veins.

“I’ve worked with Burton, so I knew first-hand the impact he has on the players he coaches,” Judge said. “He’s coached a number of great backs, he’s coached on a lot of championship teams, and he knows how to get the most out of his players. He’s tough. That’s one thing you’re going to find out about Burton right away. He’s tough. He’s hard-nosed, he coaches tough, he demands his players to play tough. But he has as deep a care for the players he coaches as anybody out there. They respond to him because they know he’s in a foxhole with them. I’m excited to have Burton here, very excited to have Burton here. I know he’s looking forward to working with the guys on the roster.”

Burns was credited with helping to develop Heisman Trophy winners Mark Ingram and Derrick Henry. One has to think that the lure of coaching Saquon Barkley was a major factor in bringing Burns out of coaching retirement.

  • 2020-Present: Running Backs Coach, New York Giants
  • 2018-2019: Assistant Athletic Director for Football, University of Alabama
  • 2007-2017: Running Backs Coach, University of Alabama
  • 1999-2006: Running Backs Coach, Clemson University
  • 1994-1998: Assistant Coach, Tulane University
  • 1986-1993: Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator, Saint Augustine High School (New Orleans, LA)
  • 1981-1985: Assistant Coach, Southern University
  • 1980: Assistant Coach, Booker T. Washington High School (New Orleans, LA)
  • 1977-1979: Assistant Coach, Saint Augustine High School (New Orleans, LA)
Wide Receivers Coach Tyke Tolbert

One of the few coaches to survive the purge, Tolbert was hired by Pat Shurmur two years ago after serving as wide receivers coach with a number of franchises including the Cardinals, Bills, Panthers, and Broncos. From an outsider’s perspective, the major reason he was brought back appears to be the development of Darius Slayton. Others such as Sterling Shepard and Cody Latimer, the latter also being with Tolbert in Denver, have not developed as hoped. Judge may have been impressed with his work with previous teams as well as the job he did with a slew of bottom tier wide receivers the Giants have had to rely on the past two seasons.

“Tyke’s a guy I knew throughout the league from going against him,” Judge said. “He’s a guy that came recommended by a lot of people that I know very personally. But ultimately, the deciding factor on Tyke is you turn his tape on, and his guys play hard, they play fundamentally sound, he’s been able to develop a number of receivers in different systems, and ultimately, the video tapes are what tells you how a guy is coaching.”

  • 2018-Present: Wide Receivers Coach, New York Giants
  • 2011-2017: Wide Receivers Coach, Denver Broncos
  • 2010: Wide Receivers Coach, Carolina Panthers
  • 2004-2009: Wide Receivers Coach, Buffalo Bills
  • 2003: Wide Receivers Coach, Arizona Cardinals
  • 2002: Tight Ends Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, University of Florida
  • 1999-2001: Wide Receivers Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
  • 1998: Tight Ends Coach, Auburn University
  • 1995-1997: Tight Ends Coach, Northeast Louisiana University
  • 1995: Wide Receivers Coach, Ohio University
  • 1994: Graduate Assistant, Northeast Louisiana University
  • 1994: Graduate Assistant, Louisiana State University
Tight Ends Coach Freddie Kitchens

A lightening rod for many fans given his disastrous debut season as a head coach with the Cleveland Browns in 2019, Kitchens was not long ago considered a rising offensive mind in the League. Indeed, it was speculated that Judge may have considered Kitchens for the offensive coordinator spot. Kitchens has a wide array of position coaching experience, including running backs, tight ends, and quarterbacks. He also was an offensive coordinator for one season in Cleveland before becoming head coach. Kitchens replaces Lunda Wells, who now ironically is the tight ends coach for the Dallas Cowboys.

“I think any position on offense is good for Freddie,” Judge said. “He’s got a lot of experience at different positions. He’s been head coach, he’s been a coordinator, he’s been a position coach. He sees it through a lot of different perspectives. What I love about Freddie is he brings an element of toughness and discipline to his room. He brings outside the box thinking a lot of times to how he approaches the game from a game plan perspective. I think he’ll be an asset to working with our offensive coaches and developing the game plan throughout the week. But ultimately, I’ve worked with Freddie, I’ve played for Freddie, and I’ve called against Freddie, and I understand what his players are about.”

  • 2020-Present: Tight Ends Coach, New York Giants
  • 2019: Head Coach, Cleveland Browns
  • 2018: Offensive Coordinator, Cleveland Browns
  • 2018: Associate Head Coach/Running Backs Coach, Cleveland Browns
  • 2017: Running Backs Coach, Arizona Cardinals
  • 2013-2016: Quarterbacks Coach, Arizona Cardinals
  • 2007-2012: Tight Ends Coach, Arizona Cardinals
  • 2006: Tight Ends Coach, Dallas Cowboys
  • 2005: Running Backs Coach, Mississippi State University
  • 2004: Tight Ends Coach, Mississippi State University
  • 2001-2003: Running Backs Coach, University of North Texas
  • 2000: Graduate Assistant, Louisiana State University
  • 1999: Running Backs/Tight Ends Coach, Glenville State College

(NFL has blocked the following video from BBI, click on link to see “Freddie Kitchens: The Most Selfless Man in the NFL”).

Offensive Line Coach Marc Colombo

Most Giants fans were pining for long-time offensive line guru Bill Callahan, but Cleveland hired Callahan in late January. Judge instead chose 41-year old and relatively still green offensive line coach Marc Colombo over the more experienced Dave DeGuglielmo, who couldn’t seem to stay in one place very long. One of the primary selling points had to be Colombo’s preexisting relationship and experience with Jason Garrett in Dallas. As a player for the Cowboys, Colombo was also a favorite of then Dallas Head Coach Bill Parcells.

“Continuity is very important, especially between the offensive coordinator and the offensive line coach, that they can be on the same page starting out,” Judge said. “One of the challenges of a new staff is getting on the same page and working through some of the differences that maybe we’ve had from past experiences but making sure we’re working to one goal. I’d say with Marc, the deciding factor wasn’t his past experience with Jason. The deciding factor was he’s a tremendous coach. His body of work as you turn on the tape and watch how his guys play with technique, execution and toughness is ultimately what the deciding factor was.”

  • 2020-Present: Offensive Line Coach, New York Giants
  • 2018-2019: Offensive Line Coach, Dallas Cowboys
  • 2016-2018: Assistant Offensive Line Coach, Dallas Cowboys
Assistant Offensive Line Coach Ben Wilkerson

Wilkerson is another Pat Shurmur hire who survived the purge. He worked under unimpressive offensive line coach Hal Hunter, who was out of coaching in 2017 before Shurmur hired him and currently remains unemployed as a coach. Judge has not publicly commented on the retention of Wilkerson. He must see something in him.

  • 2018-Present: Assistant Offensive Line Coach, New York Giants
  • 2015-2017: Assistant Offensive Line Coach, Chicago Bears
  • 2014: Assistant Football and Track Coach, North Shore Senior High School (Texas)
  • 2012-2013: Offensive Line Coach, Grambling State University
  • 2011: Offensive Administrative Intern, Louisiana State University
  • 2010: Offensive Graduate Assistant, Louisiana State University
Senior Offensive Assistant Derek Dooley

Dooley is the third assistant coach on the offensive side of the football who has served as a head coach in the NFL or at a major collegiate program. He also worked with Jason Garrett in Dallas for five seasons as wide receivers coach. He also has experience as an offensive coordinator, quarterbacks coach, tight ends coach, running backs coach, and special teams coordinator.

  • 2020-Present: Senior Offensive Assistant, New York Giants
  • 2018-2019: Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks Coach, University of Missouri
  • 2013-2017: Wide Receivers Coach, Dallas Cowboys
  • 2010-2012: Head Coach, University of Tennessee
  • 2007-2009: Head Coach, Louisiana Tech University
  • 2005-2006: Tight Ends Coach, Miami Dolphins
  • 2004: Assistant Head Coach/Running Backs Coach/Special Teams Coordinator, Louisiana State University
  • 2003: Running Backs Coach/Special Teams Coordinator, Louisiana State University
  • 2000-2002: Tight Ends Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, Louisiana State University
  • 1997-1999: Wide Receivers Coach/Co-Recruiting Coordinator, Southern Methodist University
  • 1996: Graduate Assistant, University of Georgia

At the very least, he is quite the character (see video below).

Offensive Assistant Stephen Brown

It seems Brown was probably brought onboard due to his preexisting relationship with Jason Garrett, serving in the same role in Dallas for four seasons. Judge has not commented on Brown.

  • 2020-Present: Offensive Assistant, New York Giants
  • 2016-2019: Offensive Assistant, Dallas Cowboys
  • 2013-2014: Assistant to the Head Coach/Special Teams Assistant, Buffalo Bills
  • 2009-2012: Quality Control Coach/Director of Recruiting, Syracuse University
  • 2006-2008: Student Assistant, University of Tennessee
Offensive Quality Control Coach Bobby Blick

Blick survived both the Ben McAdoo and Pat Shurmur firings. However, Judge moved him from the defensive to the offensive side of the ball. Judge has not commented on Blick. Typically, quality control coaches prepare the statistical analysis as well as the initial video study of upcoming opponents several weeks in advance of playing them.

  • 2020-Present: Offensive Quality Control Coach, New York Giants
  • 2017-2019: Defensive Assistant, New York Giants
  • 2016: Director of Player Personnel, Army
  • 2015: Special Teams Coordinator/Director of Recruiting, Samford University
  • 2014: Tight Ends/Slot Receivers Coach, Samford University
  • 2014: Special Teams Quality Control Coach, Georgia Tech
  • 2011-2013: Tight Ends/Running Backs Coach, Elon University
  • 2008-2010: Offensive Graduate Assistant, North Carolina State University
  • 2004-2007: Undergraduate Assistant, North Carolina State University
Assistant Head Coach/Defensive Coordinator Patrick Graham

The selection of Graham as assistant head coach and defensive coordinator may be the most head-scratching hire Judge made. In his only season as defensive coordinator, an admittedly undermanned Miami Dolphins defense finished 30th in yardage allowed and 32nd in points allowed. Furthermore, since Graham was still under contract, the Dolphins voluntarily allowed Graham to go to the Giants.

  • 2020-Present: Assistant Head Coach/Defensive Coordinator, New York Giants
  • 2019: Defensive Coordinator, Miami Dolphins
  • 2018: Defensive Run Game Coordinator/Inside Linebackers Coach, Green Bay Packers
  • 2016-2017: Defensive Line Coach, New York Giants
  • 2014-2015: Linebackers Coach, New England Patriots
  • 2012-2013: Defensive Line Coach, New England Patriots
  • 2011: Linebackers Coach, New England Patriots
  • 2010: Defensive Assistant Coach, New England Patriots
  • 2009: Coaching Assistant, New England Patriots
  • 2009: Defensive Line Coach, University of Toledo
  • 2007-2008: Defensive Graduate Assistant, University of Notre Dame
  • 2005-2006: Tight Ends Coach, University of Richmond
  • 2004: Defensive Line Coach, University of Richmond
  • 2002-2003: Graduate Assistant, Wagner College

When asked about Graham, Judge repeats the same word: multiple. The good news about Graham is that Belichick thought enough of him to keep him around for seven years, coaching both the defensive line and linebackers. Ironically, he also served two years on Ben McAdoo’s staff in 2016 and 2017.

Defensive Line Coach Sean Spencer

Spencer was not Judge’s first preference as this job was first offered to University of Mississippi Defensive Line Coach Freddie Roach, who apparently first accepted and then backed out of the job. Despite not having any pro coaching experience, Spencer appears to be a solid fallback option as “Coach Chaos” was widely respected for his work at Penn State.

“I’ve known Sean through the business,” Judge said. “The most impressive thing about Sean is the players he’s developed through his time at both Vanderbilt and Penn State, among other stops in his career. Sean has a great energy about him, he has great command within a room, his players respond to him, they play hard and they play fundamentally sound.”

  • 2020-Present: Defensive Line Coach, New York Giants
  • 2018-2019: Associate Head Coach/Run Game Coordinator/Defensive Line Coach, Penn State University
  • 2014-2017: Defensive Line Coach, Penn State University
  • 2011-2013: Defensive Line Coach, Vanderbilt University
  • 2009-2010: Defensive Line Coach, Bowling Green State University
  • 2007-2008: Defensive Line Coach/Special Teams Coordinator, University of Massachusetts
  • 2006: Defensive Line Coach, Hofstra University
  • 2005: Linebackers Coach, Villanova University
  • 2004: Defensive Line Coach, College of the Holy Cross
  • 2001-2003: Defensive Line Coach, University of Massachusetts
  • 2000: Defensive Line Coach, Trinity College
  • 1998-1999: Running Backs Coach, Trinity College
  • 1996-1997: Running Backs Coach, Shippensburg University
  • 1995: Running Backs/Tight Ends Coach, Wesleyan University

Outside Linebacker Coach/Senior Assistant Bret Bielema

Bielma’s career path is a bit odd and he is somewhat a controversial and “colorful” figure. As head coach, he led the Wisconsin Badgers to a 68-24 overall record and three straight Big Ten Championships. But Bielma surprisingly left Wisconsin for the head coaching position at Arkansas, where he struggled, compiling just a 29-34 record. He was fired after five seasons. Bill Belichick then hired Bielma as a consultant in 2018 and then shifted him to defensive line coach in 2019. After being the only coach Judge poached off of Belichick’s staff, Bielma interviewed for head coaching jobs at Michigan State and Colorado. However, as of now, he will be a New York Giant in 2020.

“There’s a lot of things (to like) about Bret,” Judge said. “I think Bret brings a great personality to the group, brings a great perspective on how he sees the game, he’s coached the front for some time, he’s coordinated defenses at a high level. Players respond to Bret in a positive way. He has a great way of teaching, he has a great way of getting the guys motivated, and he gets the most out of his players. He brings experience from the NFL, as well as college, so not only does he understand what’s going on in the league now, he understands what the players coming from college are used to and how to better translate the trends they’re going to see.”

  • 2020-Present: Outside Linebacker Coach/Senior Assistant, New York Giants
  • 2019: Defensive Line Coach, New England Patriots
  • 2018: Consultant to the Head Coach, New England Patriots
  • 2013-2017: Head Coach, University of Arkansas
  • 2006-2012: Head Coach, University of Wisconsin
  • 2004-2005: Defensive Coordinator, University of Wisconsin
  • 1996-2001: Linebackers Coach, University of Iowa
  • 1994-1995: Graduate Assistant, University of Iowa
  • 2002-2003: Co-Defensive Coordinator, Kansas State University

Inside Linebackers Coach Kevin Sherrer

Like Sean Spencer, Kevin Sherrer has never coached at the pro level. So it remains to be seen how well he will adjust to the pro game. Interestingly, he coached linebacker Lorenzo Carter at the University of Georgia.

“Kevin is just an old ball coach,” Judge said. “When I met Kevin, he was coaching at Hoover High School in Alabama. The next year, he was on the staff with us at Alabama. I’ve watched him progress through his career as defensive coordinator at South Alabama, his time in Georgia, his time in Tennessee. I think Kevin is a phenomenal football coach, and he coaches from the ground up with fundamentals, his players play sound and they play hard.”

  • 2020-Present: Inside Linebackers Coach, New York Giants
  • 2019: Special Teams Coordinator/Inside Linebackers Coach, University of Tennessee
  • 2018: Co-Defensive Coordinator/Inside Linebackers Coach, University of Tennessee
  • 2014-2017: Outside Linebackers Coach, University of Georgia
  • 2013: Defensive Coordinator/Defensive Backs Coach, University of South Alabama
  • 2010-2012: Director of Player Development, University of Alabama
  • 2007-2009: Defensive Coordinator, Hoover High School (Alabama)
  • 2005-2006: Defensive Assistant, Hoover High School (Alabama)
  • 2001-2004: Defensive Backs Coach, Spain Park High School (Alabama)
  • 1998-2000: Graduate Assistant, University of Alabama
  • 1996-1997: Assistant, Tuscaloosa County High School (Alabama)
Defensive Backs Coach Jerome Henderson

On the surface, Henderson doesn’t seem like an overly inspiring hire as his passing game defenses in Atlanta ranked 28th, 12th, 27th, and 22nd the last four seasons. The Falcons fired him in January. Before that, he served as defensive backs coach for the Dallas Cowboys for four seasons.

“Jerome has a great resume, he’s coached a lot of good players in a lot of good schemes,” Judge said. “I think the more you check around with Jerome, I talked to guys that he coached, the way they responded to him and the way they respected him in the room definitely said a lot about him as a coach.”

  • 2020-Present: Defensive Backs Coach, New York Giants
  • 2016-2019: Defensive Passing Game Coordinator, Atlanta Falcons
  • 2012-2015: Defensive Backs Coach, Dallas Cowboys
  • 2009-2011: Defensive Backs Coach, Cleveland Browns
  • 2008: Defensive Backs Coach, New York Jets
  • 2007: Assistant Defensive Backs Coach/Director of Player Development, New York Jets
  • 2006: Director of Player Development, New York Jets

Assistant Defensive Backs Coach Anthony Blevins

Blevins was another Pat Shurmur assistant who Judge chose to keep. However, Judge moved him from assistant special teams coach to assistant defensive backs coach. Blevins did coach defensive backs at the collegiate level.

“I’ve known Blev for some time now, and he’s coached on all three sides of the ball,” Judge said. “He brings great experience that he can contribute to a lot of different parts of developing players. One thing you learn working with the special teams is you’re learning how to develop techniques of a total player. He could easily have gone over to the offense and worked with a skilled position. He could have stayed on special teams and have been an asset. We thought right now, the best fit for Blev was to help with our defense and bring some experience he brought from the other sides of the ball and work with Jerome.”

  • 2020-Present: Assistant Defensive Backs Coach, New York Giants
  • 2018-2019: Assistant Special Teams Coach, New York Giants
  • 2013-2017: Coaching Assistant/Special Teams, Arizona Cardinals
  • 2012: Cornerbacks Coach, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • 2011: Special Teams Coach/Cornerbacks Coach, Tennessee State University
  • 2009-2010: Cornerbacks Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, Tennessee State University
  • 2008: Cornerbacks Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, University of Tennessee-Martin
  • 2005-2007: Graduate Assistant, Mississippi State University
  • 2003-2004: Defensive Backs/Running Backs Coach, Meadow Creek High School (Georgia)
Defensive Assistant Jody Wright

Judge has not publicly commented on Wright, who will serve as a defensive assistant.

  • 2020-Present: Defensive Assistant, New York Giants
  • 2019: Offensive Assistant, Cleveland Browns
  • 2018: Assistant Head Coach/Offensive Line Coach, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • 2015-2017: Director of Player Personnel, University of Alabama
  • 2014: Running Backs Coach, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • 2013: Passing Game Coordinator/Tight Ends Coach, Jacksonville State University
  • 2010-2012: Graduate Assistant/Offensive Analyst, University of Alabama
  • 2009: Assistant Athletic Director for Football Operations, Mississippi State University
  • 2006-2008: Graduate Assistant, Mississippi State University
  • 2005: Volunteer Coach, Mississippi State University
  • 2002-2004: Student Assistant Coach, Jacksonville State University
    Defensive Quality Control Coach Mike Treier

    Judge also has not commented on Treier, who will serve as defensive quality control coach. Typically, quality control coaches prepare the statistical analysis as well as the initial video study of upcoming opponents several weeks in advance of playing them.

    • 2020-Present: Defensive Quality Control Coach, New York Giants
    • 2019: Safeties Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, Marshall University
    • 2018: Defensive Backs Coach, Marshall University
    • 2017: Defensive Analyst, Marshall University
    • 2016: Co-Defensive Coordinator/Secondary Coach, University of Tennessee at Martin
    • 2014-2015: Graduate Assistant, Marshall University
    Special Teams Coordinator Thomas McGaughey

    McGaughey deservingly survived the latest coaching purge as his special teams performed decently the past two years.

    “I’ve known T-Mac from going against him as well as being in the business and I have a good relationship with him professionally and personally,” Judge said. “I have a lot of respect for him as a coach and I have a tremendous amount of respect for him as a person. He gets the most out of his players. I’ve competed against him and I knew it was always going to be tough sledding in the game there. From the perspective of having to go against him, you understand you don’t want to get him out of the building; you want to hold onto guys like that. They’re definitely key assets. He and Tom Quinn do an outstanding job of working together, coaching the players in techniques and coming up with schemes for game plans that allow them to apply pressure on the opponents.”

    • 2018-Present: Special Teams Coordinator, New York Giants
    • 2017: Special Teams Coordinator, Carolina Panthers
    • 2016: Assistant Special Teams Coach, Carolina Panthers
    • 2015: Special Teams Coordinator, San Francisco 49ers
    • 2014: Special Teams Coordinator, New York Jets
    • 2011-2013: Special Teams Coordinator/Defensive Assistant, Louisiana State University
    • 2007-2010: Assistant Special Teams Coordinator, New York Giants
    • 2005-2006: Assistant Special Teams Coordinator, Denver Broncos
    • 2004: Special Teams Coordinator/Cornerbacks Coach, University of Houston
    • 2003: Special Teams Coordinator, University of Houston
    • 2002: Special Teams Intern, Kansas City Chiefs
    • 2002: Special Teams Coordinator/Defensive Backs Coach, Scottish Claymores (NFLE)
    • 2001: Pro Scouting Assistant, Houston Texans
    • 2001: Minority Intern, Kansas City Chiefs
    • 1998-2001: Special Teams Coordinator/Defensive Backs Coach, Willowridge High School (Houston, TX)
    • 1998: Graduate Assistant, University of Houston

    Assistant Special Teams Coach Tom Quinn

    Quinn must have been reincarnated from a cat because he definitely has nine lives. Quinn miraculously not only has survived Tom Coughlin, Ben McAdoo, and Pat Shurmur, but some dreadful special teams units during his tenure as special teams coordinator for a decade with the team.

    “The experience is important, but the success is more important,” Judge said. “(McGaughey and Quinn have) been doing it at a high success rate for a long time. The fact that they had a relationship working together already, I had a relationship with both guys from going against them and have known them within the profession for some time now. T-Mac and Tom do a tremendous job. I love the way they relate to the players, I love the way they coach their guys. You know when you go against their units that they’re going to be sound and they’re going to play hard, and that’s critical. I have a lot of respect for both of them.”

    • 2018-Present: Assistant Special Teams Coach, New York Giants
    • 2007-2017: Special Teams Coordinator, New York Giants
    • 2006: Assistant Special Teams Coach, New York Giants
    • 2004-2005: Special Teams/Outside Linebackers Coach, Stanford University
    • 2002-2003: Special Teams/Tight Ends Coach, Stanford University
    • 1999-2001: Special Teams/Linebackers/Tight Ends Coach, San Jose State University
    • 1996-1998: Defensive Coordinator, College of the Holy Cross
    • 1995: Defensive Coordinator, Boston University
    • 1992-1994: Special Teams Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, James Madison University
    • 1991: Linebackers Coach, Davidson College
    Assistant Coach – Special Projects and Situations Amos Jones

    Amos was the last coach Judge hired. His title is a new one for the New York Giants franchise.

    “Amos is someone I’ve known for quite some time,” Judge said. “I have a high trust factor with him. He’s definitely somebody who has worked consistently throughout his career with a number of organizations dealing with situations. He’s got an eye for all sides of the ball. He’ll help with a lot of special projects that will come up throughout the season with evaluation of ourselves and our opponents… Amos brings a wealth of experience to our team.”

    • 2020-Present: Assistant Coach – Special Projects and Situations, New York Giants
    • 2019: Assistant Special Teams Coach, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
    • 2018: Special Teams Coordinator, Cleveland Browns
    • 2013-2017: Special Teams Coordinator, Arizona Cardinals
    • 2012: Special Teams Coordinator, Pittsburgh Steelers
    • 2007-2011: Assistant Special Teams Coach, Pittsburgh Steelers
    • 2006: Outside Linebackers Coach, Mississippi State University
    • 2004-2005: Special Teams Coordinator/Linebackers Coach, Mississippi State University
    • 2003: Tight Ends/Special Teams Coach, James Madison University
    • 1999-2002: Running Backs/Special Teams Coach, University of Cincinnati
    • 1998: Assistant Coach, East St. John High School (Louisiana)
    • 1997: Assistant Coach, BC Lions
    • 1995-1996: Linebackers Coach, Tulane University
    • 1993-1994: Assistant Coach, Eau Gallie High School (Florida)
    • 1992: Kicking Game Coach, University of Pittsburgh
    • 1990-1991: Special Teams Coach, University of Alabama
    • 1989: Assistant Coach, Shades Valley High School (Alabama)
    • 1986-1988: Defensive Line Coach, Temple University
    • 1983-1985: Tight Ends Coach, Temple University
    • 1981-1982: Graduate Assistant, University of Alabama
    Feb 052020
     
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    Marc Colombo, Dallas Cowboys (November 5, 2018)

    Marc Colombo – © USA TODAY Sports

    NEW YORK GIANTS ANNOUNCE ASSISTANT COACHES…
    The New York Giants have officially announced the team’s assistant coaches. The team’s coordinators – Assistant Head Coach/Defensive Coordinator Patrick Graham, Offensive Coordinator Jason Garrett, and Special Teams Coordinator Thomas McGaughey – were announced on January 17th.

    “The first thing I was prioritizing was good coaches who had a deep concern for the players that they were going to coach,” new Head Coach Joe Judge said in the team’s press release. “It has to start with the relationship from the coach to the player and understanding that we’re working together. Next thing I was prioritizing was good teachers. We had to find guys who can paint that mental picture for a player and find a way to tap into how they learn and get the most out of them. To me, it’s a big trust factor with the guys I have on the staff. I have a personal relationship with a lot of these guys, professional relationships with nearly all of them. Guys who I have not worked with directly, I’ve competed against, I’ve known for some time. I’ve more than done my research on everybody on this staff, including the guys I’ve worked with. No stone has been unturned. I’m very excited about the group we have in here. I know they’re going to bring a lot to this organization. I know they’re going to be a great asset to the players they’re going to coach.”

    The other 17 members of Judge’s 20-member staff are:

    Quarterbacks Coach Jerry Schuplinski

    • 2020-Present: Quarterbacks Coach, New York Giants
    • 2019: Assistant Quarterbacks Coach, Miami Dolphins
    • 2016-2018: Assistant Quarterbacks Coach, New England Patriots
    • 2013-2015: Coaching Assistant, New England Patriots
    • 2007-2012: Linebackers/Special Teams Coach, Case Western Reserve University
    • 2002-2006: Head Coach, Trinity High School (Ohio)
    • 2000-2001: Running Backs/Special Teams Coach, John Carroll University
    • Pro Experience: None
    • Collegiate Experience: John Carroll University
    • Born: April 4, 1977

    “Jerry is an incredible teacher,” said Judge. “He has done a phenomenal job of developing young quarterbacks in this league. He simplifies the game so the quarterback can play fast in terms of understanding our scheme and analyzing the opponent’s defense.”

    Running Backs Coach Burton Burns

    • 2020-Present: Running Backs Coach, New York Giants
    • 2018-2019: Assistant Athletic Director for Football, University of Alabama
    • 2007-2017: Running Backs Coach, University of Alabama
    • 1999-2006: Running Backs Coach, Clemson University
    • 1994-1998: Assistant Coach, Tulane University
    • 1986-1993: Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator, Saint Augustine High School (New Orleans, LA)
    • 1981-1985: Assistant Coach, Southern University
    • 1980: Assistant Coach, Booker T. Washington High School (New Orleans, LA)
    • 1977-1979: Assistant Coach, Saint Augustine High School (New Orleans, LA)
    • Pro Experience: None
    • Collegiate Experience: Fullback, University of Nebraska (1971-1975)
    • Born: October 27, 1952

    “I’ve worked with Burton, so I knew first-hand the impact he has on the players he coaches,” Judge said. “He’s coached a number of great backs, he’s coached on a lot of championship teams, and he knows how to get the most out of his players. He’s tough. That’s one thing you’re going to find out about Burton right away. He’s tough. He’s hard-nosed, he coaches tough, he demands his players to play tough. But he has as deep a care for the players he coaches as anybody out there. They respond to him because they know he’s in a foxhole with them. I’m excited to have Burton here, very excited to have Burton here. I know he’s looking forward to working with the guys on the roster.”

    Wide Receivers Coach Tyke Tolbert

    • 2018-Present: Wide Receivers Coach, New York Giants
    • 2011-2017: Wide Receivers Coach, Denver Broncos
    • 2010: Wide Receivers Coach, Carolina Panthers
    • 2004-2009: Wide Receivers Coach, Buffalo Bills
    • 2003: Wide Receivers Coach, Arizona Cardinals
    • 2002: Tight Ends Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, University of Florida
    • 1999-2001: Wide Receivers Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
    • 1998: Tight Ends Coach, Auburn University
    • 1995-1997: Tight Ends Coach, Northeast Louisiana University
    • 1995: Wide Receivers Coach, Ohio University
    • 1994: Graduate Assistant, Northeast Louisiana University
    • 1994: Graduate Assistant, Louisiana State University
    • Pro Experience: None
    • Collegiate Experience: Wide Receiver, Louisiana State University (1988-1990)
    • Born: September 15, 1967

    “Tyke’s a guy I knew throughout the league from going against him,” Judge said. “He’s a guy that came recommended by a lot of people that I know very personally. But ultimately, the deciding factor on Tyke is you turn his tape on, and his guys play hard, they play fundamentally sound, he’s been able to develop a number of receivers in different systems, and ultimately, the video tapes are what tells you how a guy is coaching.”

    Tight Ends Coach Freddie Kitchens

    • 2020-Present: Tight Ends Coach, New York Giants
    • 2019: Head Coach, Cleveland Browns
    • 2018: Offensive Coordinator, Cleveland Browns
    • 2018: Associate Head Coach/Running Backs Coach, Cleveland Browns
    • 2017: Running Backs Coach, Arizona Cardinals
    • 2013-2016: Quarterbacks Coach, Arizona Cardinals
    • 2007-2012: Tight Ends Coach, Arizona Cardinals
    • 2006: Tight Ends Coach, Dallas Cowboys
    • 2005: Running Backs Coach, Mississippi State University
    • 2004: Tight Ends Coach, Mississippi State University
    • 2001-2003: Running Backs Coach, University of North Texas
    • 2000: Graduate Assistant, Louisiana State University
    • 1999: Running Backs/Tight Ends Coach, Glenville State College
    • Pro Experience: None
    • Collegiate Experience: Quarterback, University of Alabama (1993-1998)
    • Born: November 29, 1974

    “I think any position on offense is good for Freddie,” Judge said. “He’s got a lot of experience at different positions. He’s been head coach, he’s been a coordinator, he’s been a position coach. He sees it through a lot of different perspectives. What I love about Freddie is he brings an element of toughness and discipline to his room. He brings outside the box thinking a lot of times to how he approaches the game from a game plan perspective. I think he’ll be an asset to working with our offensive coaches and developing the game plan throughout the week. But ultimately, I’ve worked with Freddie, I’ve played for Freddie, and I’ve called against Freddie, and I understand what his players are about.”

    Offensive Line Coach Marc Colombo

    • 2020-Present: Offensive Line Coach, New York Giants
    • 2018-2019: Offensive Line Coach, Dallas Cowboys
    • 2016-2018: Assistant Offensive Line Coach, Dallas Cowboys
    • Pro Experience: Offensive Tackle, Chicago Bears (2002-2005), Dallas Cowboys (2005-2010), Miami Dolphins (2011)
    • Collegiate Experience: Offensive Tackle, Boston College (1998-2001)
    • Born: October 8, 1978

    “Continuity is very important, especially between the offensive coordinator and the offensive line coach, that they can be on the same page starting out,” Judge said. “One of the challenges of a new staff is getting on the same page and working through some of the differences that maybe we’ve had from past experiences but making sure we’re working to one goal. I’d say with Marc, the deciding factor wasn’t his past experience with Jason. The deciding factor was he’s a tremendous coach. His body of work as you turn on the tape and watch how his guys play with technique, execution and toughness is ultimately what the deciding factor was.”

    Assistant Offensive Line Coach Ben Wilkerson

    • 2018-Present: Assistant Offensive Line Coach, New York Giants
    • 2015-2017: Assistant Offensive Line Coach, Chicago Bears
    • 2014: Assistant Football and Track Coach, North Shore Senior High School (Texas)
    • 2012-2013: Offensive Line Coach, Grambling State University
    • 2011: Offensive Administrative Intern, Louisiana State University
    • 2010: Offensive Graduate Assistant, Louisiana State University
    • Pro Experience: Offensive Lineman, Cincinnati Bengals (2005-2006), Atlanta Falcons (2007-2008), Florida Tuckers (2009)
    • Collegiate Experience: Offensive Lineman, Louisiana State University (2001-2004)
    • Born: November 22, 1982

    Senior Offensive Assistant Derek Dooley

    • 2020-Present: Senior Offensive Assistant, New York Giants
    • 2018-2019: Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks Coach, University of Missouri
    • 2013-2017: Wide Receivers Coach, Dallas Cowboys
    • 2010-2012: Head Coach, University of Tennessee
    • 2007-2009: Head Coach, Louisiana Tech University
    • 2005-2006: Tight Ends Coach, Miami Dolphins
    • 2004: Assistant Head Coach/Running Backs Coach/Special Teams Coordinator, Louisiana State University
    • 2003: Running Backs Coach/Special Teams Coordinator, Louisiana State University
    • 2000-2002: Tight Ends Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, Louisiana State University
    • 1997-1999: Wide Receivers Coach/Co-Recruiting Coordinator, Southern Methodist University
    • 1996: Graduate Assistant, University of Georgia
    • Pro Experience: None
    • Collegiate Experience: Wide Receiver, University of Virginia (1987-1990)
    • Born: June 10, 1968

    Offensive Assistant Stephen Brown

    • 2020-Present: Offensive Assistant, New York Giants
    • 2016-2019: Offensive Assistant, Dallas Cowboys
    • 2013-2014: Assistant to the Head Coach/Special Teams Assistant, Buffalo Bills
    • 2009-2012: Quality Control Coach/Director of Recruiting, Syracuse University
    • 2006-2008: Student Assistant, University of Tennessee
    • Pro Experience: None
    • Collegiate Experience: None
    • Born: May 3, 1987

    Offensive Quality Control Coach Bobby Blick

    • 2020-Present: Offensive Quality Control Coach, New York Giants
    • 2017-2019: Defensive Assistant, New York Giants
    • 2016: Director of Player Personnel, Army
    • 2015: Special Teams Coordinator/Director of Recruiting, Samford University
    • 2014: Tight Ends/Slot Receivers Coach, Samford University
    • 2014: Special Teams Quality Control Coach, Georgia Tech
    • 2011-2013: Tight Ends/Running Backs Coach, Elon University
    • 2008-2010: Offensive Graduate Assistant, North Carolina State University
    • 2004-2007: Undergraduate Assistant, North Carolina State University
    • Pro Experience: None
    • Collegiate Experience: None
    • Born: September 8, 1984

    Defensive Line Coach Sean Spencer

    • 2020-Present: Defensive Line Coach, New York Giants
    • 2018-2019: Associate Head Coach/Run Game Coordinator/Defensive Line Coach, Penn State University
    • 2014-2017: Defensive Line Coach, Penn State University
    • 2011-2013: Defensive Line Coach, Vanderbilt University
    • 2009-2010: Defensive Line Coach, Bowling Green State University
    • 2007-2008: Defensive Line Coach/Special Teams Coordinator, University of Massachusetts
    • 2006: Defensive Line Coach, Hofstra University
    • 2005: Linebackers Coach, Villanova University
    • 2004: Defensive Line Coach, College of the Holy Cross
    • 2001-2003: Defensive Line Coach, University of Massachusetts
    • 2000: Defensive Line Coach, Trinity College
    • 1998-1999: Running Backs Coach, Trinity College
    • 1996-1997: Running Backs Coach, Shippensburg University
    • 1995: Running Backs/Tight Ends Coach, Wesleyan University
    • Pro Experience: None
    • Collegiate Experience: Safety, Clarion University
    • Born: December 15, 1970

    “I’ve known Sean through the business,” Judge said. “The most impressive thing about Sean is the players he’s developed through his time at both Vanderbilt and Penn State, among other stops in his career. Sean has a great energy about him, he has great command within a room, his players respond to him, they play hard and they play fundamentally sound.”

    Outside Linebacker Coach/Senior Assistant Bret Bielema

    • 2020-Present: Outside Linebacker Coach/Senior Assistant, New York Giants
    • 2019: Defensive Line Coach, New England Patriots
    • 2018: Consultant to the Head Coach, New England Patriots
    • 2013-2017: Head Coach, University of Arkansas
    • 2006-2012: Head Coach, University of Wisconsin
    • 2004-2005: Defensive Coordinator, University of Wisconsin
    • 1996-2001: Linebackers Coach, University of Iowa
    • 1994-1995: Graduate Assistant, University of Iowa
    • 2002-2003: Co-Defensive Coordinator, Kansas State University
    • Pro Experience: Milwaukee Mustangs (1994)
    • Collegiate Experience: Defensive Lineman, University of Iowa (1989-1992)
    • Born: January 13, 1970

    “There’s a lot of things (to like) about Bret,” Judge said. “I think Bret brings a great personality to the group, brings a great perspective on how he sees the game, he’s coached the front for some time, he’s coordinated defenses at a high level. Players respond to Bret in a positive way. He has a great way of teaching, he has a great way of getting the guys motivated, and he gets the most out of his players. He brings experience from the NFL, as well as college, so not only does he understand what’s going on in the league now, he understands what the players coming from college are used to and how to better translate the trends they’re going to see.”

    Inside Linebackers Coach Kevin Sherrer

    • 2020-Present: Inside Linebackers Coach, New York Giants
    • 2019: Special Teams Coordinator/Inside Linebackers Coach, University of Tennessee
    • 2018: Co-Defensive Coordinator/Inside Linebackers Coach, University of Tennessee
    • 2014-2017: Outside Linebackers Coach, University of Georgia
    • 2013: Defensive Coordinator/Defensive Backs Coach, University of South Alabama
    • 2010-2012: Director of Player Development, University of Alabama
    • 2007-2009: Defensive Coordinator, Hoover High School (Alabama)
    • 2005-2006: Defensive Assistant, Hoover High School (Alabama)
    • 2001-2004: Defensive Backs Coach, Spain Park High School (Alabama)
    • 1998-2000: Graduate Assistant, University of Alabama
    • 1996-1997: Assistant, Tuscaloosa County High School (Alabama)
    • Pro Experience: None
    • Collegiate Experience: Tight End, University of Alabama (1993-1995)
    • Born: March 19, 1973

    “Kevin is just an old ball coach,” Judge said. “When I met Kevin, he was coaching at Hoover High School in Alabama. The next year, he was on the staff with us at Alabama. I’ve watched him progress through his career as defensive coordinator at South Alabama, his time in Georgia, his time in Tennessee. I think Kevin is a phenomenal football coach, and he coaches from the ground up with fundamentals, his players play sound and they play hard.”

      Defensive Backs Coach Jerome Henderson

      • 2020-Present: Defensive Backs Coach, New York Giants
      • 2016-2019: Defensive Passing Game Coordinator, Atlanta Falcons
      • 2012-2015: Defensive Backs Coach, Dallas Cowboys
      • 2009-2011: Defensive Backs Coach, Cleveland Browns
      • 2008: Defensive Backs Coach, New York Jets
      • 2007: Assistant Defensive Backs Coach/Director of Player Development, New York Jets
      • 2006: Director of Player Development, New York Jets
      • Pro Experience: Cornerback, New England Patriots (1991-1993), Buffalo Bills (1993-1994), Philadelphia Eagles (1995), New England Patriots (1996), New York Jets (1997-1998)
      • Collegiate Experience: Cornerback, Clemson University (1987-1990)
      • Born: August 8, 1969

      “Jerome has a great resume, he’s coached a lot of good players in a lot of good schemes,” Judge said. “I think the more you check around with Jerome, I talked to guys that he coached, the way they responded to him and the way they respected him in the room definitely said a lot about him as a coach.”

      Assistant Defensive Backs Coach Anthony Blevins

      • 2020-Present: Assistant Defensive Backs Coach, New York Giants
      • 2018-2019: Assistant Special Teams Coach, New York Giants
      • 2013-2017: Coaching Assistant/Special Teams, Arizona Cardinals
      • 2012: Cornerbacks Coach, University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • 2011: Special Teams Coach/Cornerbacks Coach, Tennessee State University
      • 2009-2010: Cornerbacks Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, Tennessee State University
      • 2008: Cornerbacks Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, University of Tennessee-Martin
      • 2005-2007: Graduate Assistant, Mississippi State University
      • 2003-2004: Defensive Backs/Running Backs Coach, Meadow Creek High School (Georgia)
      • Pro Experience: Defensive Back, Mobile Admirals (1999), Birmingham Steeldogs (2000), Birmingham Thunderbolts (2001)
      • Collegiate Experience: Cornerback, University of Alabama at Birmingham (1994-1998)
      • Born: July 23, 1976

      “I’ve known Blev for some time now, and he’s coached on all three sides of the ball,” Judge said. “He brings great experience that he can contribute to a lot of different parts of developing players. One thing you learn working with the special teams is you’re learning how to develop techniques of a total player. He could easily have gone over to the offense and worked with a skilled position. He could have stayed on special teams and have been an asset. We thought right now, the best fit for Blev was to help with our defense and bring some experience he brought from the other sides of the ball and work with Jerome.”

      Defensive Assistant Jody Wright

      • 2020-Present: Defensive Assistant, New York Giants
      • 2019: Offensive Assistant, Cleveland Browns
      • 2018: Assistant Head Coach/Offensive Line Coach, University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • 2015-2017: Director of Player Personnel, University of Alabama
      • 2014: Running Backs Coach, University of Alabama at Birmingham
      • 2013: Passing Game Coordinator/Tight Ends Coach, Jacksonville State University
      • 2010-2012: Graduate Assistant/Offensive Analyst, University of Alabama
      • 2009: Assistant Athletic Director for Football Operations, Mississippi State University
      • 2006-2008: Graduate Assistant, Mississippi State University
      • 2005: Volunteer Coach, Mississippi State University
      • 2002-2004: Student Assistant Coach, Jacksonville State University
      • Pro Experience: None
      • Collegiate Experience: None
      • Born: July 21, 1981

        Defensive Quality Control Coach Mike Treier

        • 2020-Present: Defensive Quality Control Coach, New York Giants
        • 2019: Safeties Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, Marshall University
        • 2018: Defensive Backs Coach, Marshall University
        • 2017: Defensive Analyst, Marshall University
        • 2016: Co-Defensive Coordinator/Secondary Coach, University of Tennessee at Martin
        • 2014-2015: Graduate Assistant, Marshall University
        • Pro Experience: None
        • Collegiate Experience: None
        • Born: May 9, 1990

        Assistant Special Teams Coach Tom Quinn

        • 2018-Present: Assistant Special Teams Coach, New York Giants
        • 2007-2017: Special Teams Coordinator, New York Giants
        • 2006: Assistant Special Teams Coach, New York Giants
        • 2004-2005: Special Teams/Outside Linebackers Coach, Stanford University
        • 2002-2003: Special Teams/Tight Ends Coach, Stanford University
        • 1999-2001: Special Teams/Linebackers/Tight Ends Coach, San Jose State University
        • 1996-1998: Defensive Coordinator, College of the Holy Cross
        • 1995: Defensive Coordinator, Boston University
        • 1992-1994: Special Teams Coach/Recruiting Coordinator, James Madison University
        • 1991: Linebackers Coach, Davidson College
        • Pro Experience: None
        • Collegiate Experience: Linebacker, University of Arizona (1986-1990)
        • Born: January 27, 1968

        “The experience is important, but the success is more important,” Judge said. “(McGaughey and Quinn have) been doing it at a high success rate for a long time. The fact that they had a relationship working together already, I had a relationship with both guys from going against them and have known them within the profession for some time now. T-Mac and Tom do a tremendous job. I love the way they relate to the players, I love the way they coach their guys. You know when you go against their units that they’re going to be sound and they’re going to play hard, and that’s critical. I have a lot of respect for both of them.”

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